du.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Juárez, S. P., Small, R., Hjern, A. & Schytt, E. (2017). Caesarean birth is associated with both maternal and paternal origin in immigrants in Sweden: a population-based study. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 31(6), 509-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caesarean birth is associated with both maternal and paternal origin in immigrants in Sweden: a population-based study
2017 (English)In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 509-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: To investigate the association between maternal country of birth and father's origin and unplanned and planned caesarean birth in Sweden.

METHODS: Population-based register study including all singleton births in Sweden between 1999 and 2012 (n = 1 311 885). Multinomial regression was conducted to estimate odds ratios (OR) for unplanned and planned caesarean with 95% confidence intervals for migrant compared with Swedish-born women. Analyses were stratified by parity.

RESULTS: Women from Ethiopia, India, South Korea, Chile, Thailand, Iran, and Finland had statistically significantly higher odds of experiencing unplanned (primiparous OR 1.10-2.19; multiparous OR 1.13-2.02) and planned caesarean (primiparous OR 1.18-2.25; multiparous OR 1.13-2.46). Only women from Syria, the former Yugoslavia and Germany had consistently lower risk than Swedish-born mothers (unplanned: primiparous OR 0.76-0.86; multiparous OR 0.74-0.86. Planned; primiparous OR 0.75-0.82; multiparous OR 0.60-0.94). Women from Iraq and Turkey had higher odds of an unplanned caesarean but lower odds of a planned one (among multiparous). In most cases, these results remained after adjustment for available social characteristics, maternal health factors, and pregnancy complications. Both parents being foreign-born increased the odds of unplanned and planned caesarean in primiparous and multiparous women.

CONCLUSIONS: Unplanned and planned caesarean birth varied by women's country of birth, with both higher and lower rates compared with Swedish-born women, and the father's origin was also of importance. These variations were not explained by a wide range of social, health, or pregnancy factors.

Keywords
caesarean delivery, country of birth, migration, planned caesarean, unplanned caesarean
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26298 (URN)10.1111/ppe.12399 (DOI)28913940 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Brehmer, L., Alexanderson, K. & Schytt, E. (2017). Days of sick leave and inpatient care at the time of pregnancy and childbirth in relation to maternal age. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(3), 222-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Days of sick leave and inpatient care at the time of pregnancy and childbirth in relation to maternal age
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 222-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To explore whether older women differ from younger women with respect to sick leave and inpatient care at the time around their first pregnancy and delivery.

METHODS: This was a descriptive population-based cohort study. The study population included all 236,176 nulliparous women registered as living in Sweden who gave birth to their first singleton infant in 2006-2010. Data from nationwide Swedish registers were used. Maternal age was categorized in five-year intervals. Time was calculated in years with the delivery date as the starting point, from two years before and up to three years after delivery. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate mean values and ANOVA tables were used to obtain the 95% confidence intervals of the means. Restriction was used to reduce potential confounding.

RESULTS: Women aged ⩾35 years had a higher annual mean number of sick leave days from two years before to one year after their delivery date compared with younger women. The range for all age categories in the year before the delivery date, including pregnancy, was 15.3-37.4 mean sick leave days. The mean number of inpatient days increased with each age category during the year after the date of delivery in the range 1.4-4.3 days.

CONCLUSIONS: This first explorative study indicates the need for more knowledge on morbidity among older primiparous women. They had a higher number of days with sick leave and hospitalization in the year before and after their delivery date. This might reflect higher health risks during pregnancy and childbirth among older women; however, social factors and reverse causation might also be influential.

Keywords
Maternal age, Sweden, cohort, hospitalization, population-based study, primiparous, sick leave
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25642 (URN)10.1177/1403494817693456 (DOI)28443491 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-25 Created: 2017-07-25 Last updated: 2017-07-25Bibliographically approved
Vixner, L., Mårtensson, L. B. & Schytt, E. (2015). Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience.. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15, Article ID 180.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience.
2015 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, article id 180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In a previous randomised controlled trial we showed that acupuncture with a combination of manual- and electrical stimulation (EA) did not affect the level of pain, as compared with acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA) and standard care (SC), but reduced the need for other forms of pain relief, including epidural analgesia. To dismiss an under-treatment of pain in the trial, we did a long-term follow up on the recollection of labour pain and the birth experience comparing acupuncture with manual stimulation, acupuncture with combined electrical and manual stimulation with standard care. Our hypothesis was that despite the lower frequency of use of other pain relief, women who had received EA would make similar retrospective assessments of labour pain and the birth experience 2 months after birth as women who received standard care (SC) or acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA).

METHODS: Secondary analyses of data collected for a randomised controlled trial conducted at two delivery wards in Sweden. A total of 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 min of MA or EA, or SC without acupuncture. Questionnaires were administered the day after partus and 2 months later.

RESULTS: Two months postpartum, the mean recalled pain on the visual analogue scale (SC: 70.1, MA: 69.3 and EA: 68.7) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted mean difference 0.8, 95 % confidence interval [CI] -6.3 to 7.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 1.3 CI 95 % -5.5 to 8.1). Positive birth experience (SC: 54.3 %, MA: 64.6 % and EA: 61.0 %) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 1.8, CI 95 % 0.9 to 3.7 and SC vs EA: OR 1.4 CI 95 % 0.7 to 2.6).

CONCLUSIONS: Despite the lower use of other pain relief, women who received acupuncture with the combination of manual and electrical stimulation during labour made the same retrospective assessments of labour pain and birth experience 2 months postpartum as those who received acupuncture with manual stimulation or standard care.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01197950.

Keywords
Lessing, Ben, Outsider, Other, post-colonial theory, psychoanalytical theory
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Hälsa och välfärd, Akupunktur som smärtlindring vid förlossning - En randomiserad kontrollerad studie
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-18737 (URN)10.1186/s12906-015-0708-2 (DOI)000357254700001 ()26066641 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-07-21 Created: 2015-07-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Vixner, L., Schytt, E., Stener-Victorin, E., Waldenström, U., Pettersson, H. & Mårtensson, L. B. (2014). Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14, Article ID 187.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial
Show others...
2014 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 14, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective. 

Methods: A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals. 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women. 

Results: Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67). 

Conclusions: Acupuncture does not reduce women's experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of acupuncture with electrical stimulation may be underestimated. These findings were obtained in a context with free access to other forms of pain relief.

National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Hälsa och välfärd, Akupunktur som smärtlindring vid förlossning - En randomiserad kontrollerad studie
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-14316 (URN)10.1186/1472-6882-14-187 (DOI)000337323400001 ()
Projects
Akupunktur som smärtlindring under förlossning
Available from: 2014-06-16 Created: 2014-06-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Schytt, E. & Waldenström, U. (2013). How well does midwifery education prepare for clinical practice? Exploring the views of Swedish students, midwives and obstetricians. Midwifery, 29(2), 102-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How well does midwifery education prepare for clinical practice? Exploring the views of Swedish students, midwives and obstetricians
2013 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: midwifery education in many countries has been adapted to the academic system by a stronger focus on research methodology and scientific evidence. This development has often taken place without extending the programs. We were interested in exploring views about current content of midwifery education in Sweden with a focus on clinical competencies and the new research components. OBJECTIVE: to investigate views about Swedish midwifery education held by students prior to graduation and after 1 year of practice, and by experienced midwives and obstetricians, with special focus on clinical competency. DESIGN: nationwide surveys conducted between June 2007 and January 2008, and 1 year later (follow-up of students). METHODS: self-administered questionnaires completed by 171 (83%) students and 121 (59%) of these participants after 1 year of midwifery practice, and by 162 (54%) midwives and 108 (40%) obstetricians with at least 5 years of clinical experience. The responders were asked to assess predefined intrapartum competencies, which components of the education were allocated too little and too much time, and how well the education prepared for clinical practise overall. Content analysis of open-ended questions and descriptive analyses was used. FINDINGS: most students, midwives and obstetricians were 'very' or 'fairly' satisfied with how the education prepared midwives for clinical practice and 1.8%, 4.7% and 17.6%, respectively, were dissatisfied. About half of the obstetricians and one-third of the experienced midwives rated new midwives' ability to identify deviations from normal progress as low or lacking, compared with 10% of the students. A majority found that too little time, of the 60 weeks programme, was allocated to intrapartum care and medical complications and too much time to research and writing a minor thesis. KEY CONCLUSIONS: although few were dissatisfied with how midwifery education prepared for clinical practice in general, the majority of participants would have liked more time for medical complications, intrapartum care, and emergency situations, and less for research. These findings suggest that the balance between clinical competency and research, and how the research component is integrated into clinical knowledge, should be further discussed and evaluated. Also the discrepancy between the views of newly educated midwives and those of more experienced midwives and obstetricians need further investigation.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10582 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2011.11.012 (DOI)000314949900002 ()22265224 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Aasheim, V., Waldenström, U., Hjelmstedt, A., Rasmussen, S., Pettersson, H. & Schytt, E. (2012). Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 119(9), 1108-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum
Show others...
2012 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 119, no 9, p. 1108-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Please cite this paper as: Aasheim V, Waldenström U, Hjelmstedt A, Rasmussen S, Pettersson H, Schytt E. Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum. BJOG 2012;119:1108-1116. Objective  To investigate if advanced maternal age at first birth increases the risk of psychological distress during pregnancy at 17 and 30 weeks of gestation and at 6 and 18 months after birth. Design  National cohort study. Setting  Norway. Sample  A total of 19 291 nulliparous women recruited between 1999 and 2008 from hospitals and maternity units. Methods  Questionnaire data were obtained from the longitudinal Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, and register data from the national Medical Birth Register. Advanced maternal age was defined as ≥32 years and a reference group of women aged 25-31 years was used for comparisons. The distribution of psychological distress from 20 to ≥40 years was investigated, and the prevalence of psychological distress at the four time-points was estimated. Logistic regression analyses based on generalised estimation equations were used to investigate associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress. Main outcome measures  Psychological distress measured by SCL-5. Results  Women of advanced age had slightly higher scores of psychological distress over the period than the reference group, also after controlling for obstetric and infant variables. The youngest women had the highest scores. A history of depression increased the risk of distress in all women. With no history of depression, women of advanced age were not at higher risk. Changes over time were similar between groups and lowest at 6 months. Conclusion  Women of 32 years and beyond had slightly increased risk of psychological distress during pregnancy and the first 18 months of motherhood compared with women aged 25-31 years.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10580 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03411.x (DOI)000306221000011 ()22703587 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsen, A. B., Waldenström, U., Hjelmstedt, A., Hjelmsted, A., Rasmussen, S. & Schytt, E. (2012). Characteristics of women who are pregnant with their first baby at an advanced age. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 91(3), 353-362x
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of women who are pregnant with their first baby at an advanced age
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 353-362xArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To describe the background characteristics of women who gave birth to their first child at an advanced and very advanced maternal age, including their sociodemographic background, social relationships, health behavior, physical and mental health, and reproductive history.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

SETTING: Norway. Sample. 41 236 Norwegian-speaking nulliparous women.

METHODS: Data were collected by the first questionnaire distributed in week 17 of pregnancy during the recruitment period 1999-2008. The distribution of descriptive variables in relation to age was investigated, by means of bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Advanced (33-37 years) and very advanced (≥38 years) maternal age.

RESULTS: Women who had their first baby at an advanced or very advanced age differed from the younger women with regard to a wide range of background characteristics, and this difference was most pronounced for the very advanced group. Problems related to physical aging were more common (infertility, physical health problems, sleep problems, depression and fatigue). Of the sociodemographic factors; high annual income and low level of education were most strongly correlated with high maternal age, followed by single status, unemployment, unsatisfactory relationship with partner and unplanned pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS: Besides having more age-related reproductive and physical health problems, women who had their first baby at an advanced or very advanced age constituted a heterogeneous group characterized by either socioeconomic prosperity or vulnerability.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10584 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2011.01335.x (DOI)000300674600011 ()22150020 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Schytt, E., Halvarsson, A., Pedersen-Draper, C. & Mårtensson, L. (2011). Incompleteness of Swedish local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment during childbirth. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 90(1), 77-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incompleteness of Swedish local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment during childbirth
2011 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence and content of local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment in Swedish labor and postnatal wards.

DESIGN: A Swedish national survey.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence and content of clinical guidelines for acupuncture. Setting. All Swedish labor and postnatal wards at the time of data collection (April 2007-March 2008).

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Enquiry was made on local clinical guidelines for acupuncture treatment at 50 labor and 50 postnatal wards. The standards for reporting interventions in controlled trials of acupuncture document was used to identify core aspects of acupuncture treatment and the proportion of wards with guidelines on these aspects was evaluated.

RESULTS: Guidelines were obtained from 27 labor wards and 22 postnatal wards. Descriptions of the core aspects of acupuncture treatment, such as acupuncture rationale, needling details and treatment regimens, were limited in most. All local guidelines included indications for treatment, but these were not based on scientific evidence of effect, and only two mentioned the importance of achieving de-qi - a feeling of soreness reflecting an effective treatment. Few clinical guidelines required that the practitioners' acupuncture education should be on an academic level and relevant references based on clinical trials were lacking in all guidelines.

CONCLUSION: Swedish local clinical guidelines on acupuncture for childbirth-related symptoms lack sufficient information to support midwives and obstetricians in administering acupuncture treatment. The content of the guidelines was unclear, inconclusive and, in some cases, irrelevant, and a majority lacked important information on indications and technique.

Keywords
Acupuncture; clinical guidelines; labor; postnatal
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10586 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01027.x (DOI)000287103300012 ()21275919 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Schytt, E. & Hildingsson, I. (2011). Physical and emotional self-rated health among Swedish women and men during pregnancy and the first year of parenthood. Sexual & reproductive healthcare : official journal of the Swedish Association of Midwives, 2(2), 57-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and emotional self-rated health among Swedish women and men during pregnancy and the first year of parenthood
2011 (English)In: Sexual & reproductive healthcare : official journal of the Swedish Association of Midwives, ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Self-rated health (SRH) is a valid measure that predicts mortality, morbidity, and the use of health services. We wanted to explore SRH over the time period of pregnancy and the first year of parenthood, dividing the measurement into physical and emotional SRH and also to include the fathers.

AIM: To investigate the prevalence of poor physical and emotional self-rated health in women and men during pregnancy and after childbirth and to identify associated risk factors.

METHODS: A longitudinal study of 1212 pregnant women and 1105 partners recruited in gestational week 18 and follow-ups in gestational week 33, 2 months and 1 year after childbirth. Data was collected by questionnaires.

RESULTS: In women, the prevalence of poor physical SRH increased from 20% to 37% between mid- and late pregnancy, and from 19% and 34% between 2 months and 1 year after the birth. Men had a more stable level of physical SRH, 17-19% during pregnancy and 2 months postpartum, but reached 31% 1 year after birth. A similar pattern was found for poor emotional SRH, where women's and men's poor emotional health reached 24% and 22%, respectively, at 1 year. Factors associated with poor emotional or physical SRH were: physical and emotional changes, fear of childbirth, parenthood stress, lack of partner support, bodily pain, low level of education, financial worries, tobacco use, and an emergency caesarean section.

CONCLUSIONS: Women's physical and emotional self-rated health is affected negatively by pregnancy and the first year of motherhood, but positively by childbirth. New fathers' health is stable throughout the pregnancy and the postpartum period, but is negatively affected by the first year of parenthood. Problems in mothers'and fathers' self-rated health may be longer term than many health professionals realize, generally as well as in relation to a cesarean section.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10585 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2010.12.003 (DOI)000312281700002 ()21439522 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2015-07-21Bibliographically approved
Schytt, E. & Waldenström, U. (2010). Epidural analgesia for labor pain: whose choice?. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 89(2), 238-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidural analgesia for labor pain: whose choice?
2010 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 238-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that the decision to use epidural analgesia during labor is influenced not only by the woman and her background but also by the local cultural practice in the delivery unit.

DESIGN: Population-based cohort study.

SETTING: All delivery units in Sweden.

POPULATION: A nationwide sample of 2,529 women.

METHODS: Data were collected by questionnaires in early pregnancy and two months after birth, and from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Logistic regression analysis was conducted, adjusted for gestational age, induction of labor and infant birthweight.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Epidural analgesia during labor.

RESULTS: The odds of having an epidural analgesia were more than twice as high in the Stockholm region (odds ratio (OR) 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.4) and three times higher in middle-north Sweden (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.7-5.3) compared with the south of Sweden. Of the maternal factors, nulliparity was the strongest predictor (OR 6.3; 95% CI 5.1-7.9), followed by a prenatal belief that epidural analgesia would be needed (OR 3.5; 95% CI 2.8-4.4).

CONCLUSION: The hypothesis of the study was confirmed. The woman and her background as well as the local cultural practice in the delivery unit matter with regard to the use of epidural analgesia.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10587 (URN)10.3109/00016340903280974 (DOI)000275251800013 ()19824867 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4123-405X

Search in DiVA

Show all publications