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Nordin, S., Elf, M. & McKee, K. (2024). Development and initial validation of the staff perception of residential care environments (SPORE) instrument. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 19(1), Article ID e12596.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and initial validation of the staff perception of residential care environments (SPORE) instrument
2024 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 19, no 1, article id e12596Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The impact of the physical environment on healthcare staff well-being and work performance is well recognised, yet there is a lack of instruments assessing environmental features from the perspective of staff working in residential care facilities (RCFs) for older people.

OBJECTIVES: To develop and provide initial validation of the instrument Staff Perceptions Of Residential care facility Environments (SPORE).

DESIGN: An instrument development and psychometric evaluation study.

METHODS: Based on material from a British project, items were translated and adapted for Swedish residential care facilities as SPORE. Care staff (N = 200), recruited from 20 Swedish RCFs, completed a questionnaire-based survey containing the SPORE instrument and two other instruments selected as suitable for use in the validation. In addition, an environmental assessment instrument was used for further validation. Analyses were performed at individual (staff) level and home (RCF) level.

RESULTS: The SPORE subscales demonstrated good internal consistency reliability and were moderately to strongly correlated at the individual level with the subscales of measures of person-centred care, and strongly correlated with the same measures at the home level. The SPORE subscales were also highly correlated with the total score of the instrument used to assess the quality of the physical environment.

CONCLUSION: The initial validation indicates that the SPORE instrument is promising for measuring care staff perceptions of environmental features in care facilities for older people. SPORE can be a valuable instrument for use in research and in practice to evaluate the environment as part of working towards high-quality care.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The design of the physical environment within RCFs can affect the staff's health and work performance. The instrument is useful for evaluating the environment and informing decisions about design solutions that support staff in their important work.

Keywords
care environment, evidence-based design, healthcare staff, instrument development, nursing, older people, person-centred care
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47469 (URN)10.1111/opn.12596 (DOI)001121330500001 ()38073273 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85179329713 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-12 Created: 2023-12-12 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Nordin, S., Sturge, J., Meijering, L. & Elf, M. (2023). A 5-day codesign sprint to improve housing decisions of older adults: lessons learned from Sweden and the Netherlands. International Journal of Social Research Methodology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 5-day codesign sprint to improve housing decisions of older adults: lessons learned from Sweden and the Netherlands
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Social Research Methodology, ISSN 1364-5579, E-ISSN 1464-5300Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The use of codesign methods is becoming increasingly common practice to involve and engage research participants in health research. Through codesign, end-users and stakeholders can contribute their own perspectives and experiences to solve a common problem. This article describes how a 5-day codesign sprint can be used to find solutions to improve housing decisions of older adults. Based on case studies in Sweden and the Netherlands, we identified similarities, differences, and patterns across the two contexts. By sharing methodological experiences across projects, opportunities are created for other researchers to build on the method and to integrate a creative process into traditional health research methods. We conclude that a 5-day codesign sprint can effectively and efficiently engage older adults and people with dementia in creative housing decision solutions, and we provide recommendations for future codesign sprint projects. © 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Codesign, dementia, five-day sprint, housing solutions, older adults
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46834 (URN)10.1080/13645579.2023.2247290 (DOI)001048490200001 ()2-s2.0-85168163570 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Kylén, M., Sturge, J., Lipson-Smith, R., Schmidt, S. M., Pessah-Rasmussen, H., Svensson, T., . . . Elf, M. (2023). Built Environments to Support Rehabilitation for People With Stroke From the Hospital to the Home (B-Sure): Protocol for a Mixed Method Participatory Co-Design Study. JMIR Research Protocols, 12, Article ID e52489.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Built Environments to Support Rehabilitation for People With Stroke From the Hospital to the Home (B-Sure): Protocol for a Mixed Method Participatory Co-Design Study
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2023 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 12, article id e52489Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: A global trend is to move rehabilitation closer to people's neighborhoods and homes. Still, little attention has been given to how the built environment outside the hospital setting might impact rehabilitation and recovery for stroke survivors.

OBJECTIVE: The overarching objective of this project is to develop conceptual models of built environments that support stroke rehabilitation and recovery outside the hospital setting. Specifically, the project will explore factors and characteristics of the built environment that support people with stroke and their families and identify innovative built environments that can be designed for local health care. The project will examine facilitators and obstacles for implementing built environmental solutions and evaluate the potential benefits, feasibility, and acceptability.

METHODS: The project uses a mixed methods design approach with 3 phases. In phase 1, factors and characteristics of the built environment for rehabilitation will be identified. Based on the results from phase 1, phase 2 will involve co-designing prototypes of environments to support the rehabilitation process for people with stroke. Finally, the prototypes will be evaluated in phase 3. Qualitative and quantitative methods will include a literature review, a concept mapping (CM) study, stakeholder interviews, prototype development, and testing. The project will use multidimensional scaling, hierarchical cluster analysis, descriptive statistics for quantitative data, and content analysis for qualitative data. Location analysis will rely on the location-allocation model for network problems, and the rule-based analysis will be based on geographic information systems data.

RESULTS: As of the submission of this protocol, ethical approval for the CM study and the interview study has been obtained. Data collection is planned to start in September 2023 and the workshops later in the same year. The scoping review is ongoing from January 2023. The CM study is ongoing and will be finalized in the spring of 2024. We expect to finish the data analysis in the second half of 2024. The project is a 3-year project and will continue until December 2025.

CONCLUSIONS: We aim to determine how new environments could better support a person's control over their day, environment, goals, and ultimately control over their recovery and rehabilitation activities. This "taking charge" approach would have the greatest chance of transferring the care closer to the patient's home. By co-designing with multiple stakeholders, we aim to create solutions with the potential for rapid implementation. The project's outcomes may target other people with frail health after a hospital stay or older persons in Sweden and anywhere else. The impact and social benefits include collaboration between important stakeholders to explore how new environments can support the transition to local health care, co-design, and test of new conceptual models of environments that can promote health and well-being for people post stroke.

INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/52489.

Keywords
accessibility, built environment, good quality and local care, meaningful activities, participation, participatory co-design, person-centered, self-efficacy, stroke rehabilitation
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47255 (URN)10.2196/52489 (DOI)001114840300008 ()37943590 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180295745 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-16 Created: 2023-11-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Fakhfakh, M., Blanchette, V., Plourde, K. V., Gadio, S., Elf, M., Jones, A., . . . Légaré, F. (2023). Canadian older adults' intention to use an electronic decision aid for housing decisions: a cross-sectional online survey. JMIR Aging, 6, Article ID e43106.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Canadian older adults' intention to use an electronic decision aid for housing decisions: a cross-sectional online survey
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2023 (English)In: JMIR Aging, E-ISSN 2561-7605, Vol. 6, article id e43106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Older adults experiencing disabilities such as loss of autonomy face the decision of whether to stay at home or move to a healthcare facility such as a nursing home. Thus, they may need support for this difficult decision.

OBJECTIVE: We assessed Canadian older adults' intention to use an electronic decision aid (eDA) for making housing decisions and identified the factors that influenced their intention.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using an online survey targeting older adults across the 10 Canadian provinces and 3 territories. We included respondents from an online panel who were aged 65 years or older, understood English or French, had access to an electronic device with an internet connection and had made a housing decision over the past few months or were planning to make a decision in the coming year. We based the online survey on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT). We adapted 17 UTAUT items to measure respondents' intention to use the eDA for housing decisions, as well as items measuring 4 intention constructs (performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions). We also assessed e-Health literacy using subjective and objective scales. We used descriptive statistics and multivariable linear regression analyses to identify factors influencing the intention to use the eDA.

RESULTS: Of the 11,972 eligible panellists, 1,176 met the eligibility criteria and 1,000 (85%) respondents completed the survey. The mean age was 72.5 ± 5.59 years. Most respondents were male (54.8%), white (90.6%), English-speakers (62.9%) and living in Ontario or Quebec (62.8%) in urban areas (85%). Mean scores for subjective e-Health literacy were 27.8 ± 5.88 out of 40 and for objective e-Health literacy, 3.00 ± 0.97 out of 5. In our sample, the intention score was 4.74 ± 1.7 out of 7. Mean scores of intention constructs out of 7 were 5.63 ± 1.28 for facilitating conditions, 4.94 ± 1.48 for performance expectancy, 5.61 ± 1.35 for effort expectancy and 4.76 ± 1.59 for social influence. In the final model, factors associated with intention included mother tongue (β = .30; P <.001), objective e-Health literacy (β = -.06; P =.03), performance expectancy (β = .55; P <.001), social influence (β = .37; P <.001) and facilitating conditions (β = .15; P <.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this pan-Canadian online survey suggest that Canadian older adults' intention to use an eDA to make housing decisions are similar to findings in other studies using UTAUT. Factors identified as influencing intention were mother tongue, objective e-Health literacy, performance expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions. These will guide future strategies for implementing the eDA.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44964 (URN)10.2196/43106 (DOI)000999614000026 ()36566499 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85149812696 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-02 Created: 2023-01-02 Last updated: 2023-08-03Bibliographically approved
Elf, M., Slaug, B., Ytterberg, C., Heylighen, A. & Kylén, M. (2023). Housing Accessibility at Home and Rehabilitation Outcomes After a Stroke: An Explorative Study. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 6(4), 172-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing Accessibility at Home and Rehabilitation Outcomes After a Stroke: An Explorative Study
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2023 (English)In: Health Environments Research & Design Journal, ISSN 1937-5867, E-ISSN 2167-5112, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 172-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To explore if aspects of the physical home environment are related to rehabilitation outcomes among community-living persons poststroke.

BACKGROUND: Research demonstrates that healthcare environments are important for high-quality care and that the design of the physical environment is associated with improved rehabilitation outcomes. However, relevant research focusing on outpatient care settings, such as the home, is sparse.

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data on rehabilitation outcomes, physical environmental barriers, and housing accessibility problems were collected during home visits of participants (N = 34), 3 months poststroke. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and correlation analysis.

RESULTS: Few participants had adapted their homes, and the relevance of the physical environment was not always discussed with the patient during discharge from the hospital. Accessibility problems were associated with suboptimal rehabilitation outcomes such as worse perceived health and recovery after stroke. Activities most restricted by barriers in the home concerned hand and arm use. Participants who reported one or more falls at home tended to live in houses with more accessibility problems. Perceived supportive home environments were associated with more accessible dwellings.

CONCLUSIONS: Many face problems adapting their home environments poststroke, and our findings highlight unmet needs that should be considered in the rehabilitation practice. These findings could be used by architectural planners and health practitioners for more effective housing planning and inclusive environments.

Keywords
built environment, person–environment fit, rehabilitation, shared–decision making, stroke
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46174 (URN)10.1177/19375867231178313 (DOI)001008343500001 ()37287249 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162983148 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-14 Created: 2023-06-14 Last updated: 2023-11-06Bibliographically approved
Palm, K., Kronlid, C., Brantnell, A., Elf, M. & Borg, J. (2023). Identifying and Addressing Barriers and Facilitators for the Implementation of Internet of Things in Distributed Care: Protocol for a Case Study. JMIR Research Protocols, 12, Article ID e44562.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying and Addressing Barriers and Facilitators for the Implementation of Internet of Things in Distributed Care: Protocol for a Case Study
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2023 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 12, article id e44562Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The internet of things (IoT) is recognized as a valuable approach to supporting health care to achieve quality and person-centered care. This study aims to identify the facilitators and barriers associated with implementing IoT solutions in health care within a Scandinavian context. It addresses the pressing need to adapt health care systems to the demographic changes occurring in Scandinavia. The vision of “Vision eHealth 2025,” a long-term strategic direction for digitalization in Sweden, serves as the background for this project. The implementation of IoT solutions is a crucial aspect of achieving the vision’s goal of making Sweden a global leader in using digitalization and eHealth opportunities by 2025. IoT is recognized as a valuable approach to supporting health care to achieve quality and person-centered care. Previous research has shown that there is a gap in our understanding of social and organizational challenges related to IoT and that the implementation and introduction of new technology in health care is often problematic.

Objective: In this study, we will identify facilitating and hindering factors for the implementation of IoT solutions in social and health care.

Methods: We will use an explorative design with a case study approach. The data collection will comprise questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Also, a literature review will be conducted at the start of the project. Thus, quantitative and qualitative data will be collected concurrently and integrated into a convergent mixed methods approach.

Results: As of June 2023, data for the review and 22 interviews with the stakeholders have been performed. The co-design with stakeholders will be performed in the fall of 2023.

Conclusions: This study represents a unique and innovative opportunity to gain new knowledge relevant and useful for future implementation of new technology at health care organizations so they can continue to offer high-quality, person-centered care. The outcomes of this research will contribute to a better understanding of the conditions necessary to implement and fully use the potential of IoT solutions. By developing cocreated implementation strategies, the study seeks to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Ultimately, this project aims to facilitate the adoption of IoT solutions in health care for promoting improved patient care and using technology to meet the evolving needs of health care.

Keywords
barriers; digital health; facilitators; health care; implementation; internet of things; IoT solution; older people; person-centered care; technology
National Category
Telecommunications Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47062 (URN)10.2196/44562 (DOI)001085480800003 ()37768725 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180305830 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-01 Created: 2023-10-01 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Aronsson, J., Nichols, A., Warwick, P. & Elf, M. (2023). Nursing students' and educators' perspectives on sustainability and climate change: An integrative review. Journal of Advanced Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' and educators' perspectives on sustainability and climate change: An integrative review
2023 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: To identify and synthesize research on the awareness, attitudes and action related to sustainability and climate change from the perspective of nursing students and educators globally.

Design: Integrative review.

Methods: The review was guided by Whittemore and Knafl. Included studies were appraised using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. A deductive content analysis based on Elo and Kyngäs' methodology was employed.

Data Sources: CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, British Education Index, GreenFILE and Scopus were searched up to the 8th November 2022.

Results: Thirty-two studies were included in the review. Two studies included nursing educators in their samples, the rest focused solely on students. Findings suggest that whilst some students were aware of sustainability issues and felt that nurses have a responsibility to mitigate climate change, others showed limited awareness and believed that nurses have more important priorities. A global interest was seen among students for increased curricular content related to sustainability and climate change. Waste management and education of others were suggested actions students can take; however, barriers included lack of confidence and limited power.

Conclusion: There is a need for sustainability education within nursing curricula, accompanied by student support.

Implications for the Profession: The review acts as a starting point to make sustainable healthcare and climate change mitigation integral aspects of nursing.

Impact: Sustainability education within nursing curricula can positively impact on sustainable healthcare and climate change mitigation. More research is needed on the perspectives of nursing educators.

Reporting Method: The review is reported according to the PRISMA guidelines.

Patient or Public Contribution: No Patient or Public Contribution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
climate change, environment, higher education, nursing, sustainability, sustainable development goals
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47281 (URN)10.1111/jan.15950 (DOI)001101616100001 ()37962107 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176365854 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Mauritzson, E., McKee, K. J., Elf, M. & Borg, J. (2023). Older Adults' Experiences, Worries and Preventive Measures Regarding Home Hazards: A Survey on Home Safety in Sweden. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(2), Article ID 1458.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older Adults' Experiences, Worries and Preventive Measures Regarding Home Hazards: A Survey on Home Safety in Sweden
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 2, article id 1458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Home safety is important for preventing injuries and accidents among older adults living at home. Feeling safe at home is also essential for older adults' well-being. Thus, this study aimed to explore older adults' perceptions of safety in their homes by examining their experiences, worries and preventive measures in relation to a range of potential home-based health and safety hazards. The study was a national cross-sectional telephone survey of 400 randomly selected adults over 70 years of age living at home in ordinary housing in Sweden. Participants were asked for their experience of, worry about, and preventive measures taken regarding fifteen home hazards. Data were also collected on background variables including age, health, and cohabitation status. Falls and stab/cut injuries were the most experienced hazards and worry was highest for burglary and falls, while preventive measures were most common for fire and burglary. While older adults' experience and worry regarding home hazards were associated with preventive measures, these associations were not strong and other factors were associated with preventive behaviour. Further identification of the main determinants of older adults' preventive behaviour can contribute to policy for effectively reducing home accidents.

Keywords
+70 years of age, community living, home safety, national survey, neighbourhood, older adults, preventive behaviour, self-reported health, social support, worry
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-45280 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20021458 (DOI)000917034900001 ()36674213 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146747093 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-25 Created: 2023-01-25 Last updated: 2023-05-26Bibliographically approved
Klockar, E., Kylén, M., Gustavsson, C., Finch, T., Jones, F. & Elf, M. (2023). Self-management from the perspective of people with stroke – An interview study. Patient Education and Counseling, 112, Article ID 107740.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-management from the perspective of people with stroke – An interview study
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2023 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 112, article id 107740Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Self-management support can improve quality of life, mood, self-efficacy, and physical function following a stroke. Knowledge of how people with stroke understand and experience self-management in different contexts is crucial to developing effective self-management support. This study explored how people with stroke understand and practice self-management during the post-acute phase. Method: A descriptive study using qualitative content analysis to explore data from semistructured interviews Results: Eighteen participants were interviewed. Most participants interpreted self-management as ‘taking care of their business’ and ‘being independent”. However, they encountered difficulties performing daily activities, for which they felt unprepared. Although interest in implementing self-management support increases, participants did not report receiving specific advice from healthcare professionals. Conclusion: People continue to feel unprepared to manage everyday activities after hospital discharge and must largely work things out for themselves. There is an overlooked opportunity to start the process of self-management support earlier in the stroke pathway, with healthcare professionals and people with stroke combining their skills, ideas and expertise. This would enable confidence to self-management to flourish rather than decrease during the transition from hospital to home. Practical implications: Individual tailored self-management support could help people with stroke more successfully manage their daily lives post-stroke. © 2023 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ireland Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Content analysis, Qualitative, Self-management, Self-management support, Stroke, Stroke rehabilitation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-45873 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2023.107740 (DOI)000983762000001 ()37059027 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152146746 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-20 Created: 2023-04-20 Last updated: 2023-06-12Bibliographically approved
Tuvemo Johnson, S., Flink, M., Peterson, E., Gottberg, K., Elf, M., Johansson, S., . . . Ytterberg, C. (2023). Self-management of falls in people with multiple sclerosis: A scoping review. Clinical Rehabilitation, 37(2), 162-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-management of falls in people with multiple sclerosis: A scoping review
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 162-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Falls are common in people with multiple sclerosis. There is rising interest in how the multifactorial and chronic nature of fall risk among people with multiple sclerosis can be addressed through self-management. Thus, the aims were to investigate the extent and the scope of publications on self-management of falls in people with multiple sclerosis, and to identify how the concept of self-management was defined and used. Data sources A systematic literature search in Medline, Cochrane, Web of Science and PsycInfo was conducted to identify publications until July 2022. Review methods Published methodological guidance was followed. Articles targeting: (1) people with multiple sclerosis, (2) falls, and (3) self-management were selected. Of 1656 records, 203 publications were assessed for eligibility, of which 173 did not meet the inclusion criteria, and 16 publications did not contain empirical data. The type of publication, study focus, and study design was extracted. If applicable, key findings, self-management tasks and skills, and the definition of self-management were extracted. Results Fourteen original articles met all inclusion criteria. Ten articles represented six different fall prevention interventions. Three publications were randomized controlled trials. Self-management content was variable and not comprehensive in nature. None of the 14 publications included a self-management definition. Conclusion The limited number of original articles and the even fewer intervention studies show that the research on self-management of falls in people with multiple sclerosis is in its infancy. To progress in the research area of self-management of falls, a more robust, consensus-based description of self-management frameworks and activities is needed.

Keywords
Behaviour, decision making, education, falls, intervention
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-42848 (URN)10.1177/02692155221128723 (DOI)000862094000001 ()36177511 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139224190 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-17 Created: 2022-10-17 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Bygga evidens om den byggda miljöns påverkan på hälsa (BUILD)Byggda miljöer för att stödja rehabilitering för patienter med stroke - Från sjukhuset till hemmet (B Sure)Trygga bostäder för äldre personer genom smart teknik; Publications
Mauritzson, E., McKee, K. J., Elf, M. & Borg, J. (2023). Older Adults' Experiences, Worries and Preventive Measures Regarding Home Hazards: A Survey on Home Safety in Sweden. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(2), Article ID 1458. Mauritzson, E., McKee, K., Elf, M. & Borg, J. (2022). Perceptions and experiences of safety at home: a survey among older adults in Sweden. In: 26th Nordic Congress of Gerontology. Abstracts: Change and continuity. Paper presented at 26th Nordic Congress of Gerontology, 26NKG, June 8-10, 2022 Odense, Denmark (pp. 277-277). Mauritzson, E., McKee, K., Elf, M. & Borg, J. (2022). Preventing accidents and injuries: older adults' experiences, worries, and preventive measures regarding home hazards. In: 36th Annual Conference of the European Health Psychology Society. Abstracts: Charting new territories in health psychology. Paper presented at 36th Annual Conference of the European Health Psychology Society, EHPS2022 (pp. 707-707).
Utveckling och utvärdering av en digital tvilling för personcentrerad hemtjänst från brukares och socialtjänstens perspektivIoT ImplementeringRehabilitering i hemmet - utveckling av en hållbar modell som sätter personens behov och miljön i centrum (InHome)Socialt hållbara boendemiljöer för äldre personer: en litteraturöversikt och konsultation med nyckelintressenter för att understödja evidensbaserade rekommendationerBoendemiljöer för äldre – vad har betydelse för personen?
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7044-8896

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