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Agahi, N., Dahlberg, L. & Carin, L. (2019). Social integration and alcohol consumption among older people: A four-year follow-up of a Swedish national sample. Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 196, 40-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social integration and alcohol consumption among older people: A four-year follow-up of a Swedish national sample
2019 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 196, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Today’s older people drink more alcohol than earlier cohorts of older people. Social integration has been identified as an important factor for older people’s drinking, but the association is complex. This study investigates both high and low levels of social integration and their associations with longitudinal patterns of alcohol consumption among older women and men.

Methods: Longitudinal nationally representative data of older Swedish women and men aged over 65 – the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) – from 2010/2011 and 2014 (n = 1048). Associations between social contacts and social activities at baseline and longitudinal patterns of drinking frequency were examined with multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results: Men reported drinking alcohol more often than women, but the most common drinking frequency among both women and men was to drink monthly or less. Drinking habits were generally stable over time. People with high levels of social activity at baseline were more likely to have a stable daily or weekly drinking frequency or increased drinking frequency over the four-year follow-up period, particularly women. People with low levels of social contacts and/or social activities were less likely to have a stable daily or weekly drinking frequency, compared to people in the low and stable drinking frequency group.

Conclusions: Alcohol consumption is embedded in a social context, older people drink in social situations and social integration predicts continued drinking patterns.

Keywords
alcohol, social integration, social context, older adults, change
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29319 (URN)10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.12.011 (DOI)30660938 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Aartsen, M., Valtorta, N., Dahlberg, L., van Regenmortel, S., Waldegrave, C. & Corrigan, T. (2018). Exclusion from social relations in later life: Briefing paper.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exclusion from social relations in later life: Briefing paper
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Series
ROSEnet Policy Briefing Paper Series ; 1
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28361 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Naseer, M., Dahlberg, L. & Fagerström, C. (2018). Health related quality of life and emergency department visits in adults of age ≥ 66 years: a prospective cohort study.. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 16(1), Article ID 144.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health related quality of life and emergency department visits in adults of age ≥ 66 years: a prospective cohort study.
2018 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Age increases the risk of emergency department [ED] visits. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is often estimated as an outcome of ED visits, but it can be a risk factor of ED visits. This study aims to assess the association of HRQoL with time to first ED visit and/or frequent ED use in older adults during four-year period and if this association differs in 66-80 and 80+ age groups.

METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Blekinge of wave 2007-2009 was used in combination with electronic health records on ED visits. The analytical sample included 673 participants of age 66 years and older with information on HRQoL. Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess the association between HRQoL and time to first ED visit. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association of HRQoL with frequent ED use.

RESULTS: During the study period, 55.3% of older adults visited the ED and 28.8% had a frequent ED use. Poor physical HRQoL was independently associated with first ED visit both in total sample (p < 0.001) and in 66-80 (p < 0.001) and 80+ (p = 0.038) age groups. Poor mental HRQoL had no significant association with first ED visit and frequent ED use.

CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that poor physical HRQoL is associated with time to first ED visit in older adults. Therefore, physical HRQoL should be considered while planning interventions on the reduction of ED utilisation in older adults. Explanatory factors of frequent ED use may differ in age groups. Further studies are needed to identify associated factors of frequent ED visits in 80+ group.

Keywords
Care utilisation, Emergency visit, Older adults, Quality of life, Subjective health
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28261 (URN)10.1186/s12955-018-0967-y (DOI)000439735900001 ()30041629 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-09
Dahlberg, L., Agahi, N. & Lennartsson, C. (2018). Lonelier than ever?: Loneliness of older people over two decades. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 75, 96-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lonelier than ever?: Loneliness of older people over two decades
2018 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 75, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To live with feelings of loneliness has negative implications for quality of life, health and survival. This study aimed to examine changes in loneliness among older people, both with regard to prevalence rates, and socio-demographic, social and health-related correlates of loneliness. This study had a repeated cross-sectional design and was based on the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD). Analyses of trends in loneliness covered the years 1992, 2002, 2004, 2011 and 2014, and included people aged 77 years or older (n=2 572). Analyses of correlates of loneliness covered 2004 and 2014, and included people aged 70 years or older (n=1 962). Logistic regression analyses were conducted with findings presented as average marginal effects. Contrary to what is often assumed, there has been no increase in loneliness among older people over time (1992-2014). Regression analyses for 2004 and 2014 showed that social and health-related correlates were more strongly associated with loneliness than socio-demographic correlates. Psychological distress was most strongly associated with loneliness, followed by widowhood. Most associations between the correlates and loneliness were stable over time.

Keywords
loneliness; older people; trend; predictor; risk factor
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26599 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2017.11.004 (DOI)000426105800015 ()29220739 (PubMedID)
Note

Open Access APC beslut 2/2018

Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Lennartsson, C., Agahi, N., Shaw, B. & Dahlberg, L. (2018). Loneliness, social isolation, and all-cause mortality in older women and men. In: : . Paper presented at 24th Nordic Congress in Gerontology, Oslo, 2-4 maj 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loneliness, social isolation, and all-cause mortality in older women and men
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare, Att leva i samhällets utkant: Social exkludering bland äldre kvinnor och män i Sverige
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28357 (URN)
Conference
24th Nordic Congress in Gerontology, Oslo, 2-4 maj 2018
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-00668
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg, L., Andersson, L. & Lennartsson, C. (2018). Long-term predictors of loneliness in old age: Results of a 20-year national study. Aging & Mental Health, 22(2), 190-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term predictors of loneliness in old age: Results of a 20-year national study
2018 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: There is a general lack of longitudinal research on loneliness in old age. Drawing on life course theory and the convoy model, this study aimed to examine whether there is an association between loneliness in old age and social engagement 20 years earlier.

Method: Data from the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (2002 and 2011 data collection waves) and the Swedish Level of Living Survey (1981 and 1991 data collection waves) were used, including 823 individuals with an average age of 82.4 years at follow-up.

Results: Each form of social engagement in old age was associated with the same form of social engagement 20 years earlier. Close forms of social engagement were negatively associated with loneliness in old age; as were more distant forms of social engagement, but only when they were considered solely in old age.

Conclusion: Patterns of social engagement in old age were established at least 20 years earlier. Close forms of social engagement are long-term predictors of loneliness, although current social engagement tended to be more influential on loneliness. The study underlines the importance of interventions targeted at close relationships that can provide social support in old age.

Keywords
loneliness, social factors, life course, convoy model, longitudinal
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-23320 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2016.1247425 (DOI)000419876800005 ()27802772 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-1704
Note

Open Access APC beslut 1/2018

Available from: 2016-11-02 Created: 2016-11-02 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Olsen, M., Dahlberg, L., Boström, A.-M., McKee, K. & Udo, C. (2018). Older people’s views on the important values in home help provision: a Swedish study. In: : . Paper presented at 24th Nordic Conference of Gerontology, Oslo, Norway, 2-4 May 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older people’s views on the important values in home help provision: a Swedish study
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Little is known about the values that older people consider important in receipt of home help. Therefore, this study aimed to explore which values older people hold in relation to home help services and their experiences of how these values are reflected in the delivery of help. Interviews were conducted from November 2015 to March 2016 with 16 older persons (age ≥65 years) who received home help at the time of the study. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results identified values that older people find important in home help and suggest behaviours that should underpin home help, such as supporting the older person’s independence, building a reciprocal relationship and promoting a sense of safety and security (e.g., by providing information about what home help entails for the recipient). We conclude that it is important that care staff recognise and integrate these values into their actions on an interpersonal level in daily care, adopting a relation-oriented rather than a task-focused approach in the provision of home help for older people.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-27690 (URN)
Conference
24th Nordic Conference of Gerontology, Oslo, Norway, 2-4 May 2018.
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg, L., Agahi, N., Schön, P. & Lennartsson, C. (2018). Planned and unplanned hospital admissions and their relationship with social factors: Findings from a national, prospective study of people aged 76 years or older. Health Services Research, 53(6), 4248-4267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Planned and unplanned hospital admissions and their relationship with social factors: Findings from a national, prospective study of people aged 76 years or older
2018 (English)In: Health Services Research, ISSN 0017-9124, E-ISSN 1475-6773, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 4248-4267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To examine the relationship between social factors and planned and unplanned hospital admissions among older people.

Data Sources/Study Setting

2011 data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) and data from the Swedish National Patient Register until December 31, 2012.

Study Design

The study had a prospective design. Data were analyzed via Cox proportional hazard regressions with variables entered as blocks (social factors, sociodemographic and ability factors, health factors).

Data Collection

Data were collected via interviews with people aged 76+ (n = 931).

Principal Findings

Living in institutions was negatively associated with planned admissions (hazard ratio (HR): 0.29; confidence interval (CI): 0.09–0.88), while being in receipt of home help was positively associated with unplanned admissions (HR: 1.57; CI: 1.15–2.14). Low levels of social contacts and social activity predicted unplanned admissions in bivariate analyses only. Higher ability to deal with public authorities was positively associated with planned admissions (HR: 1.77; CI: 1.13–2.78) and negatively associated with unplanned admissions, although the latter association was only significant in the bivariate analysis.

Conclusions

Hospital admissions are not only due to health problems but are also influenced by the social care situation and by the ability to deal with public authorities.

Keywords
Older adults; Risk factor; Hospitalization; Home help; Competence
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare, Varför söker äldre personer akutsjukvård? Orsaker, omständigheter och förklaringar
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-27975 (URN)10.1111/1475-6773.13001 (DOI)000450017700015 ()29952093 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056312544 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00440
Note

Open Access APC beslut 16/2018

Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Naseer, M., Dahlberg, L. & Fagerström, C. (2018). Poor health related quality of life: A risk factor of emergency visits among older adults. In: : . Paper presented at 24th Nordic Congress in Gerontology, Oslo, 2-4 maj 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poor health related quality of life: A risk factor of emergency visits among older adults
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare, Varför söker äldre personer akutsjukvård? Orsaker, omständigheter och förklaringar
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28359 (URN)
Conference
24th Nordic Congress in Gerontology, Oslo, 2-4 maj 2018
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00440
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg, L., Berndt, H., Lennartsson, C. & Schön, P. (2018). Receipt of formal and informal help with specific care tasks among older people living in their own home: National trends over two decades. Social Policy & Administration, 52(1), 91-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Receipt of formal and informal help with specific care tasks among older people living in their own home: National trends over two decades
2018 (English)In: Social Policy & Administration, ISSN 0144-5596, E-ISSN 1467-9515, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 91-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden is seen as a typical example of a social-democratic welfare regime, with universal and generous welfare policies. However, in the last decades, there have been substantial reductions in the Swedish provision of care for older people. This study aimed to examine trends in sources of care-receipt in older people (77+) living in their own home and with a perceived need of help with two specific tasks: house cleaning or food shopping. Trends in care-receipt were examined in relation to gender, living alone, having children and socioeconomic position. Data from the 1992, 2002 and 2011 data collection waves of the national study SWEOLD was used. Response rates varied between 86 and 95 per cent, and the sample represents the population well. Trends and differences between groups were explored in bivariate and logistic regression analyses. There was a reduction in formal care-receipt regarding house cleaning and food shopping over the study period. It was more common for women than men to receive formal care, and more common for men than women to receive informal care. Reductions in formal care have affected older women more than older men. Still, living alone was the most influential factor in care-receipt, associated with a greater likelihood of formal care-receipt and a lower likelihood of informal care-receipt. It can be concluded that public responsibility for care is becoming more narrowly defined in Sweden, and that more responsibility for care is placed on persons in need of care and their families.

Keywords
Family care; Home help; Informal care; Re-familialization; Sweden; Welfare state
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-23413 (URN)10.1111/spol.12295 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-19 Created: 2016-11-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7685-3216

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