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Nyberg, G., Backman, E. & Larsson, H. (2019). Exploring the meaning of movement capabilityin physical education teacher education through student voices. European Physical Education Review, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the meaning of movement capabilityin physical education teacher education through student voices
2019 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Scholars argue that movement content knowledge in physical education teacher education (PETE) needs to be revisited and problematised. In this paper we develop the concept of movement capability representing a widened view of movement content knowledge. If teacher educators want to teach movement capability as an intrinsic educational goal in PETE there is an apparent need to consider what to teach, how it is taught and also how movement capability is understood by the learners. The aim of this paper is to analyse how PETE students experience the meaning of movement capability through the teaching in aquatics, dance and ice-skating. This study takes its departure from a number of previous empirical studies investigating the meaning of movement capability. Interviews with seven PETE students, divided into two focus groups, were conducted on three occasions. A phenomenographic analysis shows four qualitatively different ways of experiencing the meaning of movement capability. Major differences that can be seen when comparing the results of a previous study on physical education teachers and students in PETE are the aspect of subjective experiences and the aspect of the observer. In the main, the students do not seem to take into account an observer’s point of view to the same extent as the group of teachers. The results will hopefully contribute to a deeper and more complex understanding of what can be seen as movement capability in PETE and physical education, and thereby enhance development of the teaching and learning of this capability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Movement capability, knowing, movement, physical education, physical education teacher
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, (Hur uppfattar studenter) Rörelse som ämneskunskap inom idrottslärarutbildningen?
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29861 (URN)10.1177/1356336X19841086 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Nyberg, G. & Larsson, H. (2019). Moving beyond rigid orthodoxies in the teaching and assessment of movement in Swedish physical education teacher education: A student perspective. European Physical Education Review, 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving beyond rigid orthodoxies in the teaching and assessment of movement in Swedish physical education teacher education: A student perspective
2019 (English)In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss physical education teacher education (PETE) students’ conceptions of teaching and assessment of movement capability as a part of content knowledge in aquatics, dance and ice-skating at a university in Sweden. The theoretical perspective involves Shulman’s concept of content knowledge, the further elaboration of content knowledge into common content knowledge, and the theoretical perspective underpinning movement capability. The sample consists of two groups with a total of seven PETE students who volunteered to take part in group interviews. Semi-structured interviews with the two groups were conducted on three occasions. Findings display that the students’ conceptions of movement capability seem to be focused around performance of movements. Further, the participants felt the messages to be unclear in terms of what they are to know regarding movement capability before entering PETE. There was also a contradiction in that the PETE students felt it to be obvious that they would ‘know’ certain movements, and at the same time they requested clear and distinct criteria when it came to the performance of movements. This study shows that expectations in terms of PETEstudents’ levels of movement content knowledge need to be further investigated and discussed.

This study also highlights the importance of conceptualising what PETE students need to learn if they are to see the need to develop their movement capability on their own. Assessments of students’ reflections on what it means to master movements are discussed as an alternative to assessment of performance of movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Common content knowledge, movement capability, physical education teacher education
National Category
Educational Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, (Hur uppfattar studenter) Rörelse som ämneskunskap inom idrottslärarutbildningen?
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29837 (URN)10.1177/1356336X19837287 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063352831 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Nyberg, G., Tolgfors, B. & Quennerstedt, M. (2019). Transitions from Physical Education Teacher Education to teaching practices in Physical Education. In: : . Paper presented at AISEP International conference New York, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitions from Physical Education Teacher Education to teaching practices in Physical Education
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research display mixed results regarding the impact that teacher education have on teaching practices in schools. While some studies indicate weak influence of teacher education, others display that some content and perspectives in teacher education seem to find their expressions in school practice. Despite the lack of research about the impact of physical education teacher education (PETE), a few existing studies display the same twofold result as for teacher education in general. In this study, we have chosen a certain content, assessment of learning (AFL) in order to investigate the influence that PETE can have for newly qualified teachers (NQT) in physical education (PE). The aim of the project is twofold. Firstly, inspired by Bernstein’s theory of the pedagogic device, the aim is to investigate how AFL is constructed in university courses, re-contextualised in practicum courses, and realised in teaching practice in school PE. Secondly, and inspired by Ball’s theory of performativity, the aim is to analyse fabrications of AFL in the transitions from PETE to PE teaching practice. The design of the project is to follow a total of 10 PETE students recruited from two different PETE universities in Sweden to study how their understanding and teaching practice of AFL is transformed from PETE to PE. Empirical material will be gathered from recordings of seminars, observations for teaching, stimulated-recall-interviews, and participation in social media.

National Category
Health Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, Övergången från idrottslärarutbildning till lärarpraktik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29839 (URN)
Conference
AISEP International conference New York, 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
Rönnqvist, M., Larsson, H., Nyberg, G. & Barker, D. (2019). Understanding learners’ sense making of movement learning in physical education. Curriculum studies in Health and Physical Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding learners’ sense making of movement learning in physical education
2019 (English)In: Curriculum studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

There is a substantial body of physical education scholarship focusing on movement learning. The question of how pupils themselves make sense of movement learning has however, largely escaped attention. Answers to such a question would seem to be highly germane if educators are to engage in pupil centered pedagogies. In light of this absence, the aim of this investigation was to describe how movement learners made sense of their own movement development. Drawing on theoretical tenets of Gilbert Ryle (2009. The concept of mind. New York, NY: Routledge) and Michael Polanyi (1969. Knowing and being. Essays by Michael Polanyi . Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press), three cases from an investigation in which movement learning was occurring are presented. The investigation was conducted during a physical education project week with pupils from an upper secondary school. Data were produced using observations, informal interviews, semi-structured interviews, and research diaries as a group of pupils learned to juggle. The results suggest that: the aspects of moving to which learners attend change as they learn; learners have a relatively limited capacity to verbally articulate what they learn, and; learners ’ expectations of ideal ways of moving have considerable impact on how they come to make sense of their own ways of moving. The practical implications of these points are discussed in the final section of the paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29889 (URN)10.1080/25742981.2019.1601499 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-14 Created: 2019-04-14 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Nyberg, G. & Larsson, H. (2018). Att röra sig bortom rigida ortodoxier i undervisning och bedömning av rörelsepraktiker inom idrottslärarutbildning – ett studentperspektiv. In: : . Paper presented at SVEBI konferens, Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, 21-22 november 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att röra sig bortom rigida ortodoxier i undervisning och bedömning av rörelsepraktiker inom idrottslärarutbildning – ett studentperspektiv
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning; Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29103 (URN)
Conference
SVEBI konferens, Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, 21-22 november 2018
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, G. (2018). Teaching and learning movement capability in PE: learning to run differently. In: : . Paper presented at 2018 AIESEP World Congress International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education, 25-28 July, Edinburgh.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching and learning movement capability in PE: learning to run differently
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teaching and learning movement capability in PE: learning to run differently

One aim with PEH in Sweden is to develop students all round movement capability. What movement capability means is however unclear and subsequently also what students are supposed to learn and know. Also, capability to move seems to be a taken-for-granted prerequisite for, or outcome of, being physically active.

This presentation reports an action research project taking a departure from previous research exploring what movement capability can mean. The result from this study indicated that knowing one’s own way of moving was a significant specific way of knowing as a part of movement capability. The aim with this action research project was a) to investigate what it means, from the perspective of the students, to know one’s own way of moving when running in different settings and with different purposes and B) to investigate how learning situations can be formed to provide possibilities for students to develop their knowing.

The project was conducted in collaboration with two PE teachers and two of their classes including a total of 40 students in upper secondary school in Sweden. A Learning study was carried out which included a pre-test, a phenomenographic analysis of the pre-test, planning teaching based on a phenomenographic approach to learning, implementing the teaching and a post-test. Then, based on analysis of the teaching and the pre-test, another cycle was carried out. Data was generated with the help of video- and audio recording.

The findings show a nuanced picture of what it means to know one’s own way of running which was not possible to know from start. Also, the findings suggest that a phenomenographic approach to teaching  can help students develop their awareness of their own  ways of moving as well as challenging implicit ‘standards of excellence’, embedded in a common approach to teaching and learning movements in PE.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, Att utveckla allsidiga rörelseförmågor i ämnet idrott och hälsa
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-27931 (URN)
Conference
2018 AIESEP World Congress International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education, 25-28 July, Edinburgh
Available from: 2018-06-16 Created: 2018-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Nyberg, G. & Larsson, H. (2017). Assessment of movement in Swedish PETE: A matter of learning or just ticking a box?. In: : . Paper presented at AIESEP International Conference, Gosier, Guadeloupe.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of movement in Swedish PETE: A matter of learning or just ticking a box?
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The general knowledge base of Health and Physical Education Teacher Education (HPETE) is growing stronger. As a part of that knowledge base there is an ongoing discussion of the meaning of HPETE students’ movement capabilities (Brown 2013, Capel et al 2011, Johnson 2013, Siedentop 2009, Tinning 2010). Lee Shulman’s (1987) framework of Content Knowledge (CK) and Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) have been used by scholars to examine how students’ ability to move and their ability to teach are valued in HPETE (Backman & Pearson 2016, Herold & Waring 2016, Ward et al 2015). However, the students’ own voices about these issues have rarely been acknowledged. The aim with this paper is therefore to examine how HPETE students at one university in Sweden experience the assessment of movement knowledge in and about aquatics, dance and ice-skating. Semi-structured interviews with two groups including a total of seven students were performed by the one researcher at three different occasions. The interviewing researcher’s regularly work is not at the same university as the participating students. The interviews focused specifically on the teaching and assessment of aquatics, dance and skating within the first semester of HPETE. The transcription of the six interviews was performed by external assistance and the students were all anonymized in the transcribed material. The following analysis, performed by two researchers stationed at the same university as the participating students, focused on how the transcribed material related to the aim and the concepts of Shulman. Preliminary results show several expressions of that the students in our study were not sure of what kinds or what level of movement knowledge were expected of them as they entered HPETE. Further, several students expressed limited possibilities to develop movement ability merely through HPETE teaching but at the same time, practicing unfamiliar movements outside HPETE teacher-led teaching was rare. Although assessment of movement knowledge were most commonly expressed as a qualitative process, some students mentioned that they occasionally experienced assessment of movement knowledge as “a-tick-in-a-box”. Interestingly, the cognitive aspects of movement knowledge (i.e. describe, observe, analyse, discuss, etc.) were on the one hand expressed as vital, but on the other as less characterized by learning compared to the practice of movement skills. The results will be analysed and discussed in relation to research within the field and in relation to Lee Shulman’s framework of CK and PCK. Although making no claims to generalize the results in this study based on the limited number of participants, they might contribute to the discussion of what forms of knowledge to prioritise in HPETE, and thereby also help develop HPE on a school level.

References

Backman, E. & Pearson, P. 2016. “We should assess the students in more authentic situations”. Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review. 22(1): 47-64.

Brown, T.D. 2013. “A vision lost? (Re)articulating an Arnoldian conception of education ‘in’ movement in physical education.” Sport, Education and Society 18 (1): 21-37.

Capel, S., Hayes, S., Katene, W. and P. Velija. 2011. “The interaction of factors which influence secondary student physical education teachers’ knowledge and development as teachers.” European Physical Education Review, 17 (2): 183–201.

Herold, F. and M. Waring. 2016. “Is practical subject matter knowledge still important? Examining the Siedentopian perspective on the role of content knowledge in physical education teacher education.” Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/17408989.2016.1192592

Johnson, T.G. 2013. “The value of performance in Physical Education teacher education.” Quest 65 (4): 485-497.

Shulman, L.S. 1987. “Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform.” Harvard Educational Review 57 (1): 1-21.

Siedentop, D. 2009. “Content Knowledge for Physical Education. In The Routledge Physical Education Reader, edited by R. Bailey and D. Kirk, 243-253. Abingdon: Routledge

Tinning, R. 2010. Pedagogy and human movement: theory, practice, research. Abingdon: Routledge.

Ward, P., Kim, I., Ko, B. and W. Li. 2015. “Effects of Improving Teachers’ Content Knowledge on Teaching and Student Learning in Physical Education.” Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport 86 (2): 130–139.

Keywords
physical education teacher education, assessment, content knowledge
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26776 (URN)
Conference
AIESEP International Conference, Gosier, Guadeloupe
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, G. & Meckbach, J. (2017). Exergames ‘as a teacher’ of movement education: exploring knowing in moving when playing dance games in physical education. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 22(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exergames ‘as a teacher’ of movement education: exploring knowing in moving when playing dance games in physical education
2017 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A fundamental dimension of school physical education (PE) is arguably movement and movement activities. However, there is a lack of discussion in the context of PE regarding what can be called the capability to move in terms of coordinative abilities, body consciousness and educing bodily senses.

Purpose: This article explores and articulates what there is to know, from the mover’s perspective, when knowing how to move in specific ways when playing exergames (dance games). Taking different ways of moving as expressing different ways of knowing as a point of departure, the following questions are the focus of this article: i) How do students move when imitating movements in a dance game, and what different ways of knowing the movements can be described in the student group? ii) What aspects of the movements are discerned simultaneously through the different ways of knowing the movements? and iii) What aspects seem critical for the students to discern and experience in order to know the movements in as complex a way as possible?

Design and analysis: The theoretical point of departure concerns an epistemological perspective on the capability to move as knowing how with no distinction between physical and mental skills, and also knowing as experiencing aspects of something to know. The data in this study comprises video recordings of students playing Nintendo Wii dance games in PE lessons in a compulsory school (for children aged between 7 and 16) in a small Swedish town. There were three PE lessons with four different stations, of which one was Nintendo Wii dance games (Just Dance 1 and 2). In total, the videoed material covers three 60-minute PE lessons, recorded during the autumn of 2012 and in which just over twenty students participated. In the study, we have used video observation as a data collection method. Jordan and Henderson (1995, 51) maintain that video observation removes the gap between ‘what people say they do and what they, in fact, do’. To conduct a systematic and thorough analysis of how the students experienced the avatar’s movements, we looked for moments where all the students and the avatar could be simultaneously observed. Two video sequences were chosen, showing four students imitating two distinct and defined movements which constituted the basis for a phenomenographic analysis.

Conclusion: The result of the phenomenographic analysis shows different ways of knowing the movements as well as what aspects are discerned and experienced simultaneously by the students. In other words, these aspects also describe knowing in terms of discerning, discriminating and differentiating aspects of ways of moving. By examining a certain exergame’s role ‘as a teacher’, we have emphasized the capability to move, from the mover’s perspective, as an intrinsic educational goal of PE while highlighting the need for systematically planning movement education.   

Keywords
capability to move, exergames, dance, movement education, knowing in moving
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-19681 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2015.1112778 (DOI)000393873900001 ()
Projects
LEXIS Lärande och Exergames i skolan
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Larsson, H. & Nyberg, G. (2017). ‘It doesn't matter how they move really, as long as they move.’ Physical education teachers on developing their students’ movement capabilities. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 22(2), 137-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘It doesn't matter how they move really, as long as they move.’ Physical education teachers on developing their students’ movement capabilities
2017 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Movement is key in physical education, but the educational value of moving is sometimes obscure. In Sweden, recent school reforms have endeavoured to introduce social constructionist concepts of knowledge and learning into physical education, where the movement capabilities of students are in focus. However, this means introducing a host of new and untested concepts to the physical education teacher community.

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how Swedish physical education teachers reason about helping their students develop movement capability.

Participants, setting and research design: The data are taken from a research project conducted in eight Swedish secondary schools called ‘Physical education and health – a subject for learning?’ in which students and teachers were interviewed and physical education lessons were video-recorded. This article draws on data from interviews with the eight participating teachers, five men and three women. The teachers were interviewed partly using a stimulated recall technique where the teachers were asked to comment on video clips from physical education lessons where they themselves act as teachers.

Data analysis: A discourse analysis was conducted with a particular focus on the ensemble of more or less regulated, deliberate and finalised ways of doing things that characterise the eight teachers’ approach to helping the students develop their movement capabilities.

Findings: The interviews indicate that an activation discourse (‘trying out’ and ‘being active’) dominates the teachers’ ways of reasoning about their task (a focal discourse). When the teachers were specifically asked about how they can help the students improve their movement capacities, a sport discourse (a referential discourse) was expressed. This discourse, which is based on the standards of excellence of different sports, conditions what the teachers see as (im)possible to do due to time limitations and a wish not to criticise the students publicly. The mandated holistic social constructionist discourse about knowledge and learning becomes obscure (an intruder discourse) in the sense that the teachers interpret it from the point of view of a dualist discourse, where ‘knowledge’ (theory) and ‘skill’ (practice) are divided.

Conclusions: Physical education teachers recoil from the task of developing the students’ movement capabilities due to certain conditions of impossibility related to the discursive terrain they are moving in. The teachers see as their primary objective the promotion of physical activity – now and in the future; they conceptualise movement capability in such a way that emphasising the latter would jeopardise their possibilities of realising the primary objective. Should the aim be to reinforce the social constructionist national curriculum, where capability to move is suggested to be an attempt at formulating a concept of knowledge that includes both propositional and procedural aspects and which is not based on the standards of excellence of either sport techniques or motor ability, then teachers will need support to interpret the national curriculum from a social constructionist perspective. Further, alternative standards of excellence as well as a vocabulary for articulating these will have to be developed. 

Keywords
discourse analysis, learning and knowledge, movement capability, physical education teaching
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-21301 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2016.1157573 (DOI)2-s2.0-84961210044 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-06-05Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Nyberg, G. & Larsson, H. (2017). PETE students’ experiences of assessment of movement: A Shulmanian perspective. In: : . Paper presented at British Educational Research Association Conference, September 2017, Sussex, Brighton, England..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PETE students’ experiences of assessment of movement: A Shulmanian perspective
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The general knowledge base of Health and Physical Education Teacher Education (HPETE) is growing stronger. As a part of that knowledge base there is an ongoing discussion of the meaning of HPETE students’ movement capabilities. Lee Shulman’s framework of Content Knowledge (CK) and Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) have been used by scholars to examine how students’ ability to move and their ability to teach are valued in HPETE. However, the students’ own voices about these issues have rarely been acknowledged. The aim with this paper is therefore to examine how HPETE students at one university in Sweden experience how movement knowledge in certain movement activities are valued in the assessment. Semi-structured interviews with two groups (3-4 students in each) with a total of seven students was performed at three different occasions focusing specifically on how aquatics, dance and skating was taught and assessed within the first semester of HPETE. Preliminary results of our first analysis of the students’ expressions of their education in aquatics show that the students experience qualitative dimension in the assessment of their performances in aquatics as well as a quantitative measurement. They also expressed a lack of teacher-led occasions for learning in and about aquatics before they assessed. Students were also uncertain of how their own practical performance was acknowledged in the assessment of aquatics in relation to their ability to observe and give feedback on their peers’ performance. The results will be analysed and discussed using Lee Shulman’s framework of CK and PCK. By extension, these results might contribute to the discussion of what forms of knowledge to prioritise in HPETE, and thereby also help develop HPE on a school level.

Keywords
physical education teacher education, assessment, content knowledge
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26777 (URN)
Conference
British Educational Research Association Conference, September 2017, Sussex, Brighton, England.
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5656-6500

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