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Tolgfors, B., Quennerstedt, M., Backman, E. & Nyberg, G. (2023). A PE teacher’s tale: journeying from teacher education to teaching practice in physical education. Sport, Education and Society, 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A PE teacher’s tale: journeying from teacher education to teaching practice in physical education
2023 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

As part of a longitudinal research project on the transition from physical education teacher education (PETE) to school physical education (PE) in Sweden and exploring whether and how PETE matters, this article uses narrative inquiry to ‘represent’ a PE teacher’s professional journey from PETE to the induction phase of PE teaching. The study focuses on his use of, and reflections on, ‘assessment for learning’ (AfL) at different stages of his teaching experience. The purpose of the study is to contribute knowledge about how positive experiences of AfL during PETE can enable the use of AfL in school PE for a newly qualified teacher. This is done by analysing one male PETE student’s reflections on AfL in the context of a campus-based course on PE assessment, his use of and reflections on AfL during his practicum, and in school PE as a newly qualified teacher. The data generation consisted of recordings of a PETE seminar, a stimulated recall interview with the participant during his final school placement, and two interviews with him in his role as a newly qualified PE teacher at two different schools. Through the PE teacher’s tale, we show how the campus-based course on PE assessment in PETE and the student teacher’s positive experience of using AfL during his practicum seem to have inspired him in his later positions. The results are discussed in relation to the perspective of occupational socialisation theory. This narrative inquiry suggests that PETE can make a difference for student teachers who are prepared to face the challenges of the induction phase of PE teaching and are able to navigate between the barriers that get in their way. We conclude the paper with some considerations regarding the study’s potential strength (trustworthiness), sharing (transferability) and service (usefulness).

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, Övergången från idrottslärarutbildning till lärarpraktik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47280 (URN)10.1080/13573322.2023.2281389 (DOI)001103563500001 ()2-s2.0-85176929193 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-11-20 Created: 2023-11-20 Last updated: 2023-12-07Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Quennersted, M., Tolgfors, B. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Activating students as resources in physical education teacher education – a complex process making social and physical capital visible.. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, 22-25 August 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activating students as resources in physical education teacher education – a complex process making social and physical capital visible.
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is well established that students in higher education need to develop evaluative skills in order to become effective learners (Guest & Riegler 2022). Assessment for Learning (AfL) is a model for assessment that strengthens learning in schools as well as in higher education (Black et al 2002). This is also the case in physical education teacher education (PETE) (Eather et al 2017, Macken et al 2020) and in school physical education (Leirhaug 2016). One of the key learning strategies in AfL is to activate peers as resources for learning, often operationalised as peer assessment. In PETE, peer assessment (or peer-assisted learning in a broader meaning) has proven to strengthen learning for both the observer and the observed (Lamb et al 2012). 

One dimension of peer assessment, that has only scarcely been covered in the PETE context (Macken et al 2020) but that is more highlighted in research of peer assessment in general teacher education (see e.g. Kilic 2016, Tait-McCutcheon & Bernadette Knewstubb 2018), is the tensions inherent in giving feedback to peers on their work, peers who might also often be friends. According to Kilic (2016, 137) preservice teachers “do not feel comfortable when critiquing another student” and Tait-McCutcheon and Knewstubb (2018, 773) argues that “peer assessment could reflect friendships more than learning outcomes”. 

Research demonstrates a complexity with regards to the potential for peer assessment in PETE. On the one hand, preservice teachers have expressed that giving feedback to peers creates a positive, safe, equal and relaxed learning environment (Lamb et al., 2012) and peer assessment has been reported to improve competence, confidence and self-efficacy among preservice teachers (Eather et al., 2017). On the other hand, a study by Macken et al. (2020) reported that preservice teachers believe their students would be mean to each other if implementing peer assessment during their school placement practice in PETE.

In this paper, we aim to further explore the complexity involved in peer assessment in PETE to get a deepened and more differentiated picture of this phenomenon. Our overall aim is to contribute to more knowledge about how to involve  preservice teachers in PETE and students in school physical education as resources for learning without risking to cause harm. Drawing on the call from Scanlon et al. (2022) for more studies on how assessment is taught in PETE, our specific aim in this paper is to investigate preservice teachers’ views on what as well as how peer assessment is taught in PETE, to be used in school physical education. We will use Pierre Bourdieu’s (1990) concept of capital, as well as the work of Hay and Penney (2013) on how accountability mechanisms functions in assessment, in order to analyse what is assigned value in peer assessment. The two questions that will guide our analysis in this paper reads: What mechanisms are assigned value in peer assessment according to preservice teachers in PETE? And: How do the mechanisms that are assigned value in peer assessment in PETE function according to preservice teachers? More knowledge about the what and the how in teaching of assessment practices in PETE can improve these practices within school physical education.

Methodology

The study presented in this paper is conducted as part of a greater project with the aim of exploring how PETE matters for school physical education. In the overall project we have recruited preservice teachers, with physical education as one of their subjects, during their last year in teacher education. During this last year, one campus-placed course in assessment and one school placement course, constituted the contexts from which we collected empirical material to this study (Authors 2021).  

The participants in this study were 21 preservice teachers from two different PETE institutions in Sweden (10 from uni A and 11 from uni B). The empirical material analysed in this study compriced of: 

1.      Three audio-recorded seminars (90-120 min each) from the campus-based assessment courses (one seminar from uni A and two from uni B) conducted before the preservice teachers’ school placement studies. 

2.      Seven individual semi-structured interviews (40-70 min each) (Kvale 1996) conducted during visits at the preservice teachers’ school placement studies (all from uni A). 

3.      Five individual Stimulated Recall (SR)-interviews conducted during visits at the preservice teachers’ school placement studies (one from A, four from B). 

4.      Two audio-recorded and semi-structured group interviews (40-60 min each) (Kvale 1996) from the campus-based assessment courses (both from A) conducted after the school placement studies. 

After having had the empirical material transcribed by an external part, a thematic content analysis was initiated by a process of familiarisation in which all four researchers were engaged (Braun et al 2017). Inspired by an abductive approach (Alvesson & Sköldberg 2017), we allowed ourselves to be open to alternative theories that could help explain the empirical material. The choice of research object was initiated by the impression from the interviews that giving feedback to peers is surrounded by a complexity, both in PETE and in school physical education. The identification of social relationships and certain types of bodies and movements as assigned with value when giving feedback to peers guided our attention towards Bourdieu-inspired interpretations of the social capital (Beames & Atencio 2008) and the physical capital (Redelius & Hay 2010).   

Educational challenges following when ‘the what’ is reflected in ‘the how’

The findings indicate that when the what-aspect of ‘social relationships’ is to be implemented into an how-aspect, the preservice teachers calls for continuous interaction ‘over time’ in order to build a safe and an allowing climate for learning. While this interaction can be implemented in PETE and in school physical education, allowing for school children to build social capital (Beames & Atencio 2008), a result from this study that calls for further discussion is how PETE can make continuous interaction between preservice teachers and school students possible during school placement studies. 

When the what-aspect of ‘articulating what to learn’ is mirrored in relation to the how-aspect of giving ‘correct feedback’ in peer assessment, this displays that physical capital in school physical education is strongly connected to standards of excellence and norms of right and wrong movement technique (Redelius & Hay 2010). These golden norms seem to be upheld by the displayed lack a common language for learning (Larsson & Redelius 2008). A question following from this study is what resources preservice teachers are offered within PETE to embody a language for learning in school physical education? 

This study also made visible that ‘the emphasis of certain forms of knowledge ’ is highly valued when preservice teachers are to give feedback to their peers, to their students (during school placement) or when they engage students to give feedback to each other.  The preservice teachers claim to handle this ‘what-aspect’ of peer assessment by focus their attention on ‘managing the sensitivity’ arising when themselves or their students are to comment on each others’ bodies in movements. 

In conclusion, the combination of social and physical capital decides what is possible to say to whom when preservice teachers and students are to give feedback to peers in PETE and in school physical education.

References

Alvesson M and Sköldberg K (2017) Tolkning och Reflektion. Vetenskapsfilosofi och Kvalitativ Metod [Interpretation and Reflection. Philosophy of Science and Qualitative Method]. Lund: Studentlitteratur. [In Swedish.]

Beames, Simon and Atencio, Matthew (2008)'Building social capital through outdoor education', Journal of Adventure Education & Outdoor Learning,8:2,99 — 112

Black, P., C. Harrison, C. Lee, B. Marshall, and D. Wiliam. 2002. Working Inside the Black Box. Assessment for Learning in the Classroom. London: GL Assessment

Bourdieu, P. (1990). The logic of practice. (Richard Nice, Trans.). Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.

Eather, N., Riley, N., Miller, D., Jones, B. (2017) Evaluating the Effectiveness of Using Peer-Dialogue Assessment for Improving Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Confidence and Competence to Teach Physical Education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 

Guest J & Riegler R (2022) Knowing HE standards: how good are students at evaluating academic work?, Higher Education Research & Development, 41:3, 714-728

Hay, P. J., and D. Penney. 2013. Assessment in Physical Education. A Sociocultural Perspective. London: Routledge.

Kilic, D. (2016) An Examination of Using Self-, Peer-, and Teacher-Assessment in Higher Education: A Case Study in Teacher Education, Higher Education Studies, 6(1), 136-144. 

Kvale, Steinar (1996). Interviews. An Introduction to Qualitative Research Interviewing. California: Sage Publications.

Lamb P Lane K & Aldous D (2012) Enhancing the spaces of reflection: A buddy peer-review process within physical education initial teacher education, European Physical Education Review 19(1) 21–38

Larsson H & Redelius K (2008) Swedish physical education research questioned—current situation and future directions, Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 13:4, 381-398, DOI: 10.1080/17408980802353354

Leirhaug 2016 Exploring the relationship between student grades and assessment for learning in Norwegian physical education, European Physical Education Review, 22(3) 298–314

Macken S, MacPhail, A & Calderon, A (2020) Exploring primary pre-service teachers’ use of ‘assessment for learning’ while teaching primary physical education during school placement, Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 25:5, 539-554

Redelius, K. & Hay, P. (2010) Defining, acquiring and transacting cultural capital through assessment in physical education, European Physical Education Review, 5(3):275–294:

Scanlon D, MacPhail, A Walsh C & Tannehill D (2022): Embedding assessment in learning experiences: enacting the principles of instructional alignment in physical education teacher education, Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, epub ahead of print

Tait-McCutcheon S & Knewstubb, B. (2018) Evaluating the alignment of self, peer and lecture assessment in an Aotearoa New Zealand pre-service teacher education course, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 43:5, 772-785

 

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, Övergången från idrottslärarutbildning till lärarpraktik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46909 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, 22-25 August 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-09-12Bibliographically approved
Tolgfors, B., Barker, D., Nyberg, G. & Larsson, H. (2023). Assessment for and of learning in nonlinear movement education practices. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment for and of learning in nonlinear movement education practices
2023 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BackgroundPrinciples such as instructional alignment and step-by-step progression are often seen as crucial features of good assessment practices in school physical education (PE). These features are problematic from nonlinear educational perspectives, which are based on the idea that movement learning cannot be expected to take place in the same manner for all students. Without some resolution of the contradiction between nonlinear pedagogies and principles of good assessment, the likelihood of physical educators fully embracing any kind of nonlinear approach to movement education remains doubtful.

Purpose and research questionOur purpose in this paper is to illustrate how assessment for and of learning (AfL and AoL) can look when implemented in nonlinear movement education practices.

MethodsIllustrations of AfL and AoL are drawn from an investigation in which one educator implements a nonlinear movement education module. The module focuses on juggling for students at high school (grade nine students aged approximately 15 years). The module provided students with 10 × 50-minute lessons to explore juggling. Data were generated through observations (film clips and field notes) and ethnographic-type interviews that were conducted with the students during the lessons.

FindingsIn the context of the nonlinear movement education module, AfL became: Interacting with students in joint exploration; Introducing learning strategies; Encouraging students to clarify and verbalise the object of learning; Helping students identify critical aspects of the movement activity, and; Inviting students to consider alternative learning trajectories. The educator then evaluates the students’ learning experiences in the context of a group performance at the end of the module. This performance can be seen as an instance of holistic assessment within a nonlinear movement education practice.

ConclusionsThe suggested holistic perspective on PE assessment could help educators to: circumvent dichotomies such as mind-body and theory-practice; approach students as active meaning-makers; re-frame students’ actions as emergent and context-dependent; and replace direct instruction with explorative teaching and learning methods. The major contribution of this study is that it shows how assessment for and of learning can be implemented in nonlinear movement education practices within a linear, goal-related and criterion-referenced, education system.

Keywords
Nonlinear teaching and learning; alternative assessment; exploratory teaching methods; movement learning; school physical education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46291 (URN)10.1080/17408989.2023.2230244 (DOI)001019839500001 ()2-s2.0-85164461679 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-06-25 Created: 2023-06-25 Last updated: 2023-08-07Bibliographically approved
Isgren Karlsson, A., Alatalo, T., Nyberg, G. & Backman, E. (2023). Exploring physical education teachers’ perceptions and attitudes towards digital technology in outdoor education. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 23(4), 510-524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring physical education teachers’ perceptions and attitudes towards digital technology in outdoor education
2023 (English)In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 510-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the Swedish educational system, there has been a recent push for digital technology in different school subjects. This paper investigates what regulates Swedish physical education teachers’ perceptions of digital technology in outdoor education. The results is reflected in a number of rules that govern Swedish physical education teachers’ perceptions and use of digital technology in outdoor education. Findings suggest that teachers’ views on the relevance of digital technology in outdoor education depends partly on curriculum formulations, but of significant importance are also other factors such as: the addressed knowledge area, grade level, choice of digital device, needs of students, and teachers’ ideological beliefs. These rules are discussed in relation to the construction of outdoor education as knowledge area within physical education and in relation to the ways in which Swedish physical education teachers relate to curriculum changes. 

Keywords
Physical Education, Outdoor Education, Digital technology, Digital tools, Bernstein, Mixed method
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education and Learning, Mistra Sport and Outdoors
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-39786 (URN)10.1080/14729679.2022.2054835 (DOI)000774865800001 ()2-s2.0-85127965263 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-03685Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research, 2016/36
Available from: 2022-03-08 Created: 2022-03-08 Last updated: 2023-09-18Bibliographically approved
Barker, D., Larsson, H. & Nyberg, G. (2023). How Movement Habits Become Relevant in Novel Learning Situations. Journal of teaching in physical education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Movement Habits Become Relevant in Novel Learning Situations
2023 (English)In: Journal of teaching in physical education, ISSN 0273-5024, E-ISSN 1543-2769Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To (a) present a theoretical framework that describes how learners’ movement habits become relevant in thedevelopment of movement capability and (b) present data that illustrate how this process occurs in practice. Method: Aninvestigation with preservice physical education teachers was conducted in two phases. The first phase involved examiningparticipants’ movement habits, and the second phase involved examining the participants’ development of novel capabilities inthe context of unicycling. Results: Empirical materials from two participants are presented as case studies. The cases demonstratehow different sets of movement habits interact with novel tasks, making the demand for creative action more or less likely. Thecases also demonstrate how subjective and physical elements are interwoven. Finally, the cases provide insights into potentiallyproductive habits for movement learning. Discussion/Conclusion: The paper is concluded with pedagogical implications,including a consideration of how crises might be managed in educational contexts

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46292 (URN)10.1123/jtpe.2022-0272 (DOI)001018599700001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-06-25 Created: 2023-06-25 Last updated: 2023-08-04Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, G., Backman, E. & Tinning, R. (2023). Moving online in physical education teacher education. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Educational Research Association Oslo March 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving online in physical education teacher education
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-45643 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Educational Research Association Oslo March 2023
Available from: 2023-03-13 Created: 2023-03-13 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Quennerstedt, M., Tolgfors, B. & Nyberg, G. (2023). Peer assessment in physical education teacher education – a complex process making social and physical capital visible. Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peer assessment in physical education teacher education – a complex process making social and physical capital visible
2023 (English)In: Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Peer assessment has been proven to improve learning for both theobserver and the observed. One dimension of peer assessment thathas been given little attention in the context of physical educationteacher education (PETE) is the tension that exists when peers givefeedback on each other’s work. In this paper, we report on Swedishpreservice teachers’ (PST) views on peer assessment used in PETEschool placements. Our findings reveal four mechanisms of peerassessment assigned value in PETE: (i) building social relations, (ii)making ‘what to learn’ visible, (iii) giving correct feedback, and(iv) handling sensitive and gendered comments. Inspired byBourdieu, we discuss learning potentials and complex challengeswith peer assessment, where the combination of social capitaland physical capital decides what is possible to say and to whomwhen peer assessment is used in the PETE school placement andin school physical education (PE).

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education and Learning, Övergången från idrottslärarutbildning till lärarpraktik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46907 (URN)10.1080/25742981.2023.2256327 (DOI)001061422700001 ()2-s2.0-85170528323 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-09-22Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, G. (2023). What it means to be a learner and what it means to learn and know in movement skill learning. Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), 75(2), 119-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What it means to be a learner and what it means to learn and know in movement skill learning
2023 (English)In: Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), ISSN 0033-6297, E-ISSN 1543-2750, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to suggest perspectives on movement capability and movement skill learning that take into account the intrinsic, meaningful value of moving in terms of the experience of the mover as a learner and a knower. Two perspectives on movement capability and movement skill learning will be presented and discussed here: phenomenology and phenomenography, with a focus on phenomenography. Since the similarity between these two perspectives has raised questions and caused some confusion, this paper attempts to clarify, mainly through empirical examples, some significant similarities and differences. An overall difference is that phenomenology is concerned with the question “what does it mean to be a learner”? A central question for phenomenographic oriented research is instead: “what does it mean for learners to learn and know what is expected to be known?”  Both approaches share an interest in acknowledging the perspective of the learner.

Keywords
Movement capability; Movement skill learning; Phenomenography; Phenomenology
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-41828 (URN)10.1080/00336297.2022.2108855 (DOI)000991747000001 ()
Projects
Learning to move differently
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Invited contribution to special issue: Social Theory and Movement Skill Learning in Kinesiology, Quest

Available from: 2022-07-05 Created: 2022-07-05 Last updated: 2023-07-31Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Tolgfors, B., Nyberg, G. & Quennerstedt, M. (2022). Activating students as resources in physical education – a complex process making symbolic, social and physical capital visible. In: : . Paper presented at Kroppsövningskonferensen, Norges Idrottshögskola, Oslo.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activating students as resources in physical education – a complex process making symbolic, social and physical capital visible
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is well established that Assessment for Learning (AfL) is a model for assessment that strengthens young peoples’ learning in schools as well as in higher education. This is also the case in school physical education and in physical education teacher education (PETE). One of the key learning strategies in AfL is to activate peers as resources for learning, often operationalized as peer assessment. In physical education, peer assessment has proven to strengthen learning for both the observer and the observed.

One dimension of peer assessment, that has only scarcely been covered in the physical education context, but that is more highlighted in research of peer assessment in general teacher education, is the tensions inherent in giving feedback to peers, and perhaps friends, on their work. It has been argued that teacher students do not feel comfortable when critiquing other teacher students, and that peer assessment could reflect friendships more than learning outcomes.

In the physical education context, studies have shown that peer assessment is one area that physical education teachers are sceptical about. Further, it has been argued that pupils can be mean to each other if implementing peer assessment during physical education teaching. In this paper we aim to dig deeper into this problematic aspect of peer assessment in physical education.

More specifically, drawing on the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of capital and using qualitative methodology, the question that will guide our analysis reads:

What capabilities and behaviours among students are by PETE students and physical education teachers acknowledged as legitimate and valuable when peer assessment is implemented in physical education teaching?  

Preliminary results show that in order for peer assessment to be successful in physical education teaching questions regarding who gives feedback on what needs to be considered.  

National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning, Övergången från idrottslärarutbildning till lärarpraktik
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-41665 (URN)
Conference
Kroppsövningskonferensen, Norges Idrottshögskola, Oslo
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2022-06-17 Created: 2022-06-17 Last updated: 2022-06-28Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, G. (2022). Developing movement capability through a phenomenographic approach to teaching and learning. In: : . Paper presented at Kroppsøvingskonferansen 3-4 juni 2022, Oslo.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing movement capability through a phenomenographic approach to teaching and learning
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How can teachers help students develop their movement capability if this is not a matter of learning sport skills imbued with ‘standards of excellence’ and how can teachers take into account the perspective of the learner? With regard to movement education, I propose that a fruitful starting point is to understand the way in which learners experience the problems and situations which they account in school physical education (Marton, 1995) which is, according to educational researchers, ‘the heart of the problem that teachers face in the classroom’ (Nuthall, 2004: 295). 

 

The insight into what learners are expected to know as well as how they know/experience this from the outset is one of the most significant aspects of teaching and learning and is therefore a fruitful starting point when planning teaching and learning movement capability. Phenomenography, and its theory of learning provides powerful ways to help learners develop their knowing in more complex ways. This approach opens up a view of teaching and learning which, instead of correcting errors, foregrounds opportunities to discern and experience ways of moving in a more complex way.

 

METODE

I will in this presentation present examples from a research approach named Learning study, which is a way to explore what it means to develop, learn and know aspects of movement capability.

 

RESULTAT

This presentation will describe results from Learning studies conducted in collaboration with teachers in physical education showing different ways of knowing in moving as well as how the teaching can be planned to enhance students movement capability

 

KONKLUSJON

A phenomenographic approach to teaching and learning movement capability can contribute to an alternative to traditional ‘step by step’ teaching which commonly starts with predetermined sport techniques. 

How can teachers help students develop their movement capability if this is not a matter of learning sport skills imbued with ‘standards of excellence’ and how can teachers take into account the perspective of the learner? With regard to movement education, I propose that a fruitful starting point is to understand the way in which learners experience the problems and situations which they account in school physical education (Marton, 1995) which is, according to educational researchers, ‘the heart of the problem that teachers face in the classroom’ (Nuthall, 2004: 295). 

 

The insight into what learners are expected to know as well as how they know/experience this from the outset is one of the most significant aspects of teaching and learning and is therefore a fruitful starting point when planning teaching and learning movement capability. Phenomenography, and its theory of learning provides powerful ways to help learners develop their knowing in more complex ways. This approach opens up a view of teaching and learning which, instead of correcting errors, foregrounds opportunities to discern and experience ways of moving in a more complex way.

 

METODE

I will in this presentation present examples from a research approach named Learning study, which is a way to explore what it means to develop, learn and know aspects of movement capability. 

RESULTAT

This presentation will describe results from Learning studies conducted in collaboration with teachers in physical education showing different ways of knowing in moving as well as how the teaching can be planned to enhance students movement capability 

KONKLUSJON

A phenomenographic approach to teaching and learning movement capability can contribute to an alternative to traditional ‘step by step’ teaching which commonly starts with predetermined sport techniques. 

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-41830 (URN)
Conference
Kroppsøvingskonferansen 3-4 juni 2022, Oslo
Available from: 2022-07-05 Created: 2022-07-05 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Bedömningspraktiker i utvecklingÄmneskunskaper i rörelse i lärarutbildning i idrott och hälsaElitidrottare och deras tränares uppfattning och kommunikation om idrottarens kroppsrörelserUndervisnings- och examinationsformer i idrottslärarutbildningen i Norge
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5656-6500

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