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Swenberg, T., Kostela, J. & Saveljeff, S. (2019). Design Matters for the Role of the University in a Regional Innovation System. In: : . Paper presented at The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design Matters for the Role of the University in a Regional Innovation System
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The role of a university in an innovation system can take on various forms. The design of that role depends on how the university enters into collaboration with other parties in the innovation system, and how they all contribute to this design. Here, we apply a social system’s design perspective, and point out some key issues and aspects that should be considered if the role of universities is to be purposefully designed, rather than formed ad hoc.

The purpose of such a design would be to support a wide scope of mutual benefits for the university and its collaborators – a “maximum output” from the engagement. The aim here is to point out concrete matters for the system’s designer(s) to consider, in order to create a role for the university in the innovation system that embraces a range of the university’s assets and capacities. Therefore, we address a number of critical issues and aspects affecting the functioning of the university in regard to an associated regional innovation system. Why these factors are critical will also be discussed.

The paper stems from a pilot-project, where 16 semi-structured interviews from four (4) different Swedish regions were analysed, including regional innovation system executives, university innovation officers and leaders, as well as university research group leaders. We have analysed the reason why certain issues are critical for success when designing a university’s role in a regional innovation system:

First, a university's contribution to the support of an innovation system through expertise consultancy and resources require other factors than participation in the innovation process by knowledge involvement does. Second, within the university there is a tendency to make a distinction between the ideation part and the utilisation part of the innovation process: different units at the university tend to show more engagement in different aspects of the process. Third, research commission is at heart for both university researchers and external parties. Fourth, the university comprises multifaceted capacities and potentials to sustain core functions in the innovation processes: as a meeting place; as a strategic knowledge broker; or as a driving force. Fifth, a university’s various networks  is a resource that might be underestimated by external parties. Sixth, much of collaborative innovation is accomplished in smaller units within the university, far from centralised university administration. Centralisation supports the university’s relations to external parties, whereas de-centralised and independent involvement of university units supports direct and efficient collaboration.  

To maximise the output from the university’s engagement in the innovation system, the university’s role must be designed to distinguish between involvement in, or support of, innovation processes, between internal and external context requirements, and between what functions are suitable for innovation collaboration for different units of the university.

Keywords
University role, Design matters, Innovation engagement, Innovation system, Innovation support, Regional development
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29576 (URN)
Conference
The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019
Projects
RegIno
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T., Kostela, J. & Saveljeff, S. (2019). Disjunctive External and Internal Ideas on the University's Role in a Regional Innovation System. In: : . Paper presented at The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disjunctive External and Internal Ideas on the University's Role in a Regional Innovation System
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Regional innovation systems are recurrently presented by model figures. The purpose of such figures is to monitor certain ideas regarding each presented system. The topic of this paper is the role of the University represented through such model figures, and what ideas such figures are created to promote. In analysing the models, a visual communication perspective is paired with network notions.

The current objective is to discuss what politics can be found behind the idea promotion, when figures created within a university is compared to figures created outside of it. The aim is to clarify core differences between motives underlying the engagement of a university in its associated regional innovation system, by taking on the research question: How should we understand the disjunctions between model imagery on the University’s role in a regional innovation system used by people inside and outside of the University, respectively?

The research method used in this pilot-project, focusing on the Dalarna region of Sweden, is an analysis of policy documents in combination with interviews. The policy documents come from universities, as well as from other institutions engaged in regional innovation systems. Primarily the model figure of the regional innovation system presented by Region Dalarna (http://www.regiondalarna.se/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Mobilisera-for-tillvaxt-Innovationsarbete-och-smart-specialisering.pdf [p.18]) is compared to Dalarna University’s model figure of its regional collaboration self-understanding (https://www.du.se/sv/Samverkan/Lägesrapport och slutrapport – Förstudie Högskolan Dalarnas roll i det regionala innovationssystemet.pdf [p.11]), and analysed in regard to policy documents on the Dalarna innovation system. Semi-structured interviews are also made with regional innovation system executives, university innovation officers and leaders, as well as university research group leaders, 14 interviews in total, spread across four (4) different Swedish regions.

The results are several: there are commonalities in the understanding of the university’s role in the Dalarna innovation system, inside and outside of Dalarna University, but also several disjunctions:

(1)   It is a common understanding that there could be cooperation between the university and others based on research, and/or through education.

(2)   One disjunction regard whether the university should act as one centrally organized hub for such collaboration, or function through a more scattered and self-organized set of units, in accordance with specific knowledge areas, where collaboration takes place.

(3)   Another disjunction appears concerning the university’s role in regard to innovation, whether it should be expected to be involved in the very innovation processes, or be an external part in support of innovation by providing resources and expertise for those that innovate.

(4)   A third disjunction concerns the university’s regional engagement, whether its prime efforts should be focused inwards the region, or if it is more important to function as a network provider and facilitator towards other regions as well as globally.

(5)   The fourth encountered disjunction regards weather the university should take on the intermediating role as a (strategic) knowledge broker that connects and encourages parties to innovation collaboration, or, yet again, the active role as the (leading) driving force in collective innovation processes, covering entire strategic areas of intervention.

(6)   A more delicate disjunction, the fifth, is the different views on knowledge, where the external expectations on the university is to deliver configured pieces of knowledge, from research or education, ready to exploit into innovation and business, whereas the university’s internal understanding is that knowledge should be developed during the collaborative process, jointly with the external parties.

The implications of these results are that (1) the common attitude of the possibility for the university to be involved in the regional innovation system which constitutes the vital starting point for such involvement to be achieved in a systematic and meaningful way. The disjunctions are in that sense topics for negotiation: (2) how much the university should centralize its innovation system involvement must be balanced against the benefits of free and active collaboration with external parties on the level of units and individuals within the organization; (3) to what degree supportive functions for an innovation system should be expected from a university, or from others, and what actual innovation activities the university should be involved in, or not; (4) weather the university should have a more operative engagement within the region, or rather emphasize its capacity as a bridge towards other regions and countries through its networks; (5) in what regards it is useful that the university has a more strategic or leading role in terms of broking knowledge, or driving innovation processes; and (6) what are the goals and terms of collaboration – exploitation of existing knowledge or mutual development of new knowledge?

We see, as the main outcomes of this study, that the outset for a university to engage in the regional innovation system is affirmative, when involvement is recognized as possible in both research and education, from within as well as from outside the university. The existing disjunctions regarding a university’s role in the innovation system, though, present a challenge for negotiation, which, if not taken seriously, risks a collapse of collaborations and a failure of the involvement.

Keywords
terms of involvement, centralization, self-organisation, global networks, regional focus, meeting place, knowledge broker, driving force
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29580 (URN)
Conference
The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019
Projects
RegIno
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
McKee, K., Kostela, J. & Dahlberg, L. (2015). Five years from now: Correlates of older people’s expectation of future quality of life. Research on Aging, 37(1), 18-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five years from now: Correlates of older people’s expectation of future quality of life
2015 (English)In: Research on Aging, ISSN 0164-0275, E-ISSN 1552-7573, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 18-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies have explored older people’s expected future quality of life (QoL), despite evidence that perceptions of one’s future influence healthy ageing. Research on this topic should embrace a range of potential influences, including perceptions of one’s neighbourhood and region. This study examined expected QoL in a random sample of the population of Dalarna, a Swedish region. A self-completion questionnaire assessed demographic characteristics, current neighbourhood and regional evaluations, self-evaluations, expectations for the future, and current and expected QoL. In total, 786 people aged ≥ 65 years participated. A sequential multiple regression model explained 44% of the variance in older people’s expected QoL, with self-reported health (sr2=.03), Expected Regional Opportunity (sr2=.03), and Perceived Regional Status (sr2=.02) having the strongest associations with expected QoL. Research on the importance of one’s neighbourhood to QoL in older people should encompass people’s perceptions of their region, to better inform social policy for healthy ageing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Older people; quality of life; expected quality of life; social influence, place attachment; neighborhood context
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-13778 (URN)10.1177/0164027513520329 (DOI)000346059100002 ()
Note

Finansiering: The Regional Development Council of Dalarna County

Available from: 2014-02-07 Created: 2014-02-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
McKee, K., Kostela, J. & Dahlberg, L. (2014). Five years from now: Correlates of older people’s expectation of future quality of life. In: Age Well - Challenges for Individuals and Society: Program 22nd Nordic Congress of Gerontology Gothenburg 25-28 May. Paper presented at 22nd Nordic Congress of Gerontology, Gothenburg 25-28 May 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five years from now: Correlates of older people’s expectation of future quality of life
2014 (English)In: Age Well - Challenges for Individuals and Society: Program 22nd Nordic Congress of Gerontology Gothenburg 25-28 May, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Few studies have explored older people’s expected future quality of life (QoL), despite evidence that perceptions of one’s future influence healthy ageing. Research on this topic should embrace a range of potential influences, including perceptions of one’s neighbourhood and region. This study examined expected QoL in a random sample of the population of Dalarna, a Swedish region. A self-completion questionnaire assessed demographic characteristics, current neighbourhood and regional evaluations, self-evaluations, expectations for the future, and current and expected QoL.  In total, 786 people aged ≥ 65 years participated. Current QoL was favourably evaluated, and while expected QoL also received a positive assessment, the mean value for expected QoL was notably lower than that for current QoL (t(755)=24.06, p<.05). Indeed, only 3.6% (n=27) of participants rated their expected QoL higher than their current QoL. A sequential multiple regression model explained 44% of the variance in older people’s expected QoL. Nine IVs were significant (p<.05) in the final model of expected QoL: current QoL (1% unique variance explained), age (1%), education level (1%), Regional Development Beliefs (1%), Perceived Regional Status (2%), self-reported health (3%), social influence (1%), Expected Regional Opportunity (3%) and expected change in housing need (1%). Our findings establish the significance of an older person’s perception of their locality for their expected future QoL. Policies that focus only on individual and relational factors for the promotion of healthy ageing are overlooking the potential contribution of an older person’s connection to their neighbourhood and region.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-14428 (URN)
Conference
22nd Nordic Congress of Gerontology, Gothenburg 25-28 May 2014
Available from: 2014-06-19 Created: 2014-06-19 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved
Ahnberg Åsenius, E., Kostela, J. & Messing, J. (2013). Metallindustrin i Sverige 2007-2011. Vinnova
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metallindustrin i Sverige 2007-2011
2013 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vinnova, 2013
Series
VINNOVA Analys, ISSN 1651-355X ; 02
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Utbildning och lärande
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-16198 (URN)978-91-86517-81-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2014-11-25Bibliographically approved
Kostela, J. & Welin, B. (2011). Konsekvensanalyser av service. Servicefrågan i den kommunala planeringsprocessen. Falun: Dalarnas forskningsråd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Konsekvensanalyser av service. Servicefrågan i den kommunala planeringsprocessen
2011 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Falun: Dalarnas forskningsråd, 2011
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-16199 (URN)978-91-86397-20-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2014-11-25Bibliographically approved
Kostela, J. & Tydén, T. (2010). FoU i kommuner, landsting och regioner: Delrapport tre från IKA-projektet. Stockholm: Sveriges kommuner och landsting
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FoU i kommuner, landsting och regioner: Delrapport tre från IKA-projektet
2010 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Sveriges kommuner och landsting, 2010
Keywords
FoU, kommun, landsting, kunskapsorganisationer
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-16196 (URN)978-91-7164-509-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2014-11-25Bibliographically approved
Hassis, L. & Kostela, J. (2010). Lärande för hållbar utveckling: ett skolutvecklingsprojekt med femton skolor från sju kommuner i Dalarna, slutrapport. Falun
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lärande för hållbar utveckling: ett skolutvecklingsprojekt med femton skolor från sju kommuner i Dalarna, slutrapport
2010 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Falun: , 2010
Series
Dalarnas Forskningsråd ; Arbetsrapport 2010
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26969 (URN)9789186397104 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved
Kostela, J. (2009). Utveckling av kontaktmannaskap: Utvärdering av ett utvecklingsprojekt inom Kompetensstegen i Bollnäs kommun. Falun: Dalarnas forskningsråd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utveckling av kontaktmannaskap: Utvärdering av ett utvecklingsprojekt inom Kompetensstegen i Bollnäs kommun
2009 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Falun: Dalarnas forskningsråd, 2009
Series
Arbetsrapport från Dalarnas forskningsråd
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-16212 (URN)978-91-88791-90-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-17 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2014-11-25Bibliographically approved
Kostela, J. & Bjerre, B. (2008). Primary prevention of drink driving by the large-scale use of alcolocks in commercial vehicles. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 40(4), 1294-1299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary prevention of drink driving by the large-scale use of alcolocks in commercial vehicles
2008 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 1294-1299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alcolocks are commercial breath test devices that prevent a motor vehicle from starting when a driver's blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is elevated. This report is an evaluation of the experiences and BAC data from the first use of alcolocks in commercial vehicles as a primary prevention strategy. In most applications, the alcolock is imposed only after an impaired driving conviction. This study, implemented in Sweden, estimates drink driving on a large scale in a variety of commercial vehicles.

Officials from 118 companies were interviewed representing 3689 alcolock-equipped vehicles used by 9614 professional drivers, an 80% compliance rate. In a contrast group of 230 transport businesses without alcolocks the interview compliance rate was 57%. Survey results probed motivation for and experience with alcolocks. Analysis of BAC test patterns showed alcohol consumption among employees through prevalence estimates of drink-driving attempts at the rate of BAC ≥ the legal limit 0.020%.

Before alcolock installation, 64% of the employers suspected alcohol problems among their employees and their motive for installing alcolocks (cost averaged 1700 €/vehicle) was to improve the transport quality. Several companies had technical problems with the alcolocks; but 98% recommended that other companies install alcolocks.

Among 600, heavy vehicles, 0.19% of all starts were prevented by elevated BAC; most during weekends and mornings. Daytime Saturday and Sunday mornings 0.72% of the drivers had elevated BAC.

Conclusions

The prevalence of drink driving among professional drivers is probably similar to that among drivers in general. Alcolocks would improve the safety margin and reduce public risk. Provided that the entire fleet of trucks, buses, and taxis in Sweden had installed alcolocks that would correspond to about half a million drink driving trips being prevented every year.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2008
Keywords
Drink driving, Traffic safety, Primary prevention, Alcolocks/ignition interlocks, Commercial vehicles
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-16193 (URN)10.1016/j.aap.2008.01.010 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3140-7378

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