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Åberg, Anna CristinaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8196-0553
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Åberg, A. C., Halvorsen, K., From, I., Bergman Bruhn, Å., Oestreicher, L. & Melander-Wikman, A. (2017). A study protocol for applying user participation and co-learning: lessons learned from the eBalance project. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(5), Article ID 512.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study protocol for applying user participation and co-learning: lessons learned from the eBalance project
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 512Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The eBalance project is based on the idea that serious exergames—i.e., computer gaming systems with an interface that requires physical exertion to play—that are well adapted to users, can become a substantial part of a solution to recognized problems of insufficient engagement in fall-prevention exercise and the high levels of fall-related injuries among older people. This project is carried out as a collaboration between eight older people who have an interest in balance training and met the inclusion criteria of independence in personal activities of daily living, access to and basic knowledge of a computer, four staff working with the rehabilitation of older adults, and an interdisciplinary group of six research coordinators covering the areas of geriatric care and rehabilitation, as well as information technology and computer science. This paper describes the study protocol of the project’s initial phase which aims to develop a working partnership with potential users of fall-prevention exergames, including its conceptual underpinnings. The qualitative methodology was inspired by an ethnographical approach implying combining methods that allowed the design to evolve through the study based on the participants’ reflections. A participatory and appreciative action and reflection (PAAR) approach, accompanied by inquiries inspired by the Normalization Process Theory (NPT) was used in interactive workshops, including exergame testing, and between workshop activities. Data were collected through audio recordings, photos, and different types of written documentation. The findings provide a description of the methodology thus developed and applied. They display a methodology that can be useful for the design and development of care service and innovations for older persons where user participation is in focus.

Keyword
user participation; reflective practise; action research; co-learning; implementation
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-24927 (URN)10.3390/ijerph14050512 (DOI)000404106400060 ()28489067 (PubMedID)
Note

Open Access APC beslut 11/2017

Available from: 2017-05-12 Created: 2017-05-12 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Åberg, A. C., Cedervall, Y., Giedraitis, V., Berglund, L., Lennhed, B., Rosendahl, E., . . . Kilander, L. (2017). Can Timed Up-and-GO (TUG) Dual Task Performance Aid Diagnosis of Dementia?. In: : . Paper presented at The World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress, 2017, 2-4 July 2017, Cape Town, South Africa. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can Timed Up-and-GO (TUG) Dual Task Performance Aid Diagnosis of Dementia?
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25244 (URN)
Conference
The World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress, 2017, 2-4 July 2017, Cape Town, South Africa
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Fielding, R. A., Travison, T. G., Kirn, D. R., Koochek, A., Reid, K. F., von Berens, Å., . . . Cederholm, T. (2017). Effect of structured physical activity and nutritional supplementation on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the VIVE2 randomized trial. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 21(9), 936-942.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of structured physical activity and nutritional supplementation on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the VIVE2 randomized trial
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2017 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The interactions between nutritional supplementation and physical activity on changes in physical function among older adults remain unclear. The primary objective of this study was to examine the impact of nutritional supplementation plus structured physical activity on 400M walk capacity in mobility-limited older adults across two sites (Boston, USA and Stockholm, Sweden).

Design

All subjects participated in a physical activity program (3x/week for 24 weeks), involving walking, strength, balance, and flexibility exercises. Subjects were randomized to a daily nutritional supplement (150kcal, 20g whey protein, 800 IU vitamin D) or placebo (30kcal, non-nutritive).

Setting

Participants were recruited from urban communities at 2 field centers in Boston MA USA and Stockholm SWE.

Participants

Mobility-limited (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) ≤9) and vitamin D insufficient (serum 25(OH) D 9 - 24 ng/ml) older adults were recruited for this study.

Measurements

Primary outcome was gait speed assessed by the 400M walk. Results: 149 subjects were randomized into the study (mean age=77.5±5.4; female=46.3%; mean SPPB= 7.9±1.2; mean 25(OH)D=18.7±6.4 ng/ml). Adherence across supplement and placebo groups was similar (86% and 88%, respectively), and was also similar across groups for the physical activity intervention (75% and 72%, respectively). Both groups demonstrated an improvement in gait speed with no significant difference between those who received the nutritional supplement compared to the placebo (0.071 and 0.108 m/s, respectively (p=0.06)). Similar effects in physical function were observed using the SPPB. Serum 25(OH)D increased in supplemented group compared to placebo 7.4 ng/ml versus 1.3 ng/ml respectively.

Conclusion

Results suggest improved gait speed following physical activity program with no further improvement with added nutritional supplementation.

Keyword
Aging, exercise, protein supplement, physical function, mobility limitation
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25159 (URN)10.1007/s12603-017-0936-x (DOI)000414338800002 ()
Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Åberg, A. C. & Ehrenberg, A. (2017). Inpatient geriatric care in Sweden: Important factors from an inter-disciplinary team perspective. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 172, 113-120.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inpatient geriatric care in Sweden: Important factors from an inter-disciplinary team perspective
2017 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 172, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to describe factors of importance for the quality of inpatient geriatric care from an inter-disciplinary team perspective, an area that has not been previously studied to our knowledge. The study design was qualitative descriptive with data being collected from focus-group interviews with members of geriatric care teams. The data collection was conducted at a Swedish university hospital with 69 beds for geriatric care. It comprised five group interviews with a total of 32 staff members, including representatives of all the seven professions working with geriatric care. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis and a thematic framework approach. Three main themes were identified as being perceived as characterising important factors essential for quality geriatric care:

  • Interactive assessment processes,
  • A holistic care approach, and
  • Proactive non-hierarchical interaction

Aspects of time and goal-orientation were additionally running like common threads through these themes and informed them. Accessibility, open communication, and staff continuity were experienced as prerequisites for well-functioning teamwork. Including patients and relatives in care planning and implementation was seen as essential for good care, but was at risk due to budget cuts that imposed shortened hospital stays. To meet the care demands of the growing population of older frail people, more specialised team-based care according to the concept of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment – which is possibly best provided by older-friendly hospitals – appears as a constructive solution for reaching high degrees of both staff and patient satisfaction in geriatric care. More research is needed in this area.

Keyword
Geriatric assessment, Person-centred care, Qualitative research methods, Interview, Holistic view
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25162 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2017.06.002 (DOI)000408022200018 ()28623800 (PubMedID)
Note

Open Access APC beslut 16/2017

Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Åberg, A. C., Grundström, A. & Cedervall, Y. (2015). Dual-task timed up and go test as part of memory assessment: a pilot study. In: : . Paper presented at ISPGR World Congress 2015, Seville, Spain: June 28 - July 2. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual-task timed up and go test as part of memory assessment: a pilot study
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-19035 (URN)
Conference
ISPGR World Congress 2015, Seville, Spain: June 28 - July 2
Available from: 2015-08-19 Created: 2015-08-19 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Cederholm, T., Kirn, D. R., Koochek, A., Reid, K. F., von Berens, Å., Travison, T. G., . . . Fielding, R. A. (2015). Effect of nutritional supplementation and structured physical activity on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: results from the VIVE2 study. In: : . Paper presented at ESPEN Congress on clinical nutrition and metabolism 2015, 5-8 September, Lisbon, Portugal. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of nutritional supplementation and structured physical activity on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: results from the VIVE2 study
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-17765 (URN)
Conference
ESPEN Congress on clinical nutrition and metabolism 2015, 5-8 September, Lisbon, Portugal
Available from: 2015-06-09 Created: 2015-06-09 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Fielding, R. A., Kirn, D. R., Koochek, A., Reid, K. F., von Berens, Å., Travison, T. G., . . . Cederholm, T. (2015). Effect of nutritional supplementation and structured physical activity on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: results from the VIVE2 study. In: : . Paper presented at EUGMS Congress 2015, 16-18 September, Oslo, Norway. European Union Geriatric Medicine Society.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of nutritional supplementation and structured physical activity on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: results from the VIVE2 study
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, 2015
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-17766 (URN)
Conference
EUGMS Congress 2015, 16-18 September, Oslo, Norway
Available from: 2015-06-09 Created: 2015-06-09 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Cedervall, Y., Torres, S. & Åberg, A. C. (2015). Maintaining well-being and selfhood through physical activity: experiences of people with mild Alzheimer's disease. Aging & Mental Health, 19(8), 679-688.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining well-being and selfhood through physical activity: experiences of people with mild Alzheimer's disease
2015 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 679-688Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To contribute to furthering the understanding of how people with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) reason about physical activity as part of everyday life, with a specific focus on the meanings attached to such activity. 

Method: In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 individuals with mild AD. Qualitative content analysis was used to interpret the data. 

Results: The analysis revealed three sub-themes reflecting interrelated perspectives on how people with mild AD reason about physical activity: (1) striving to be physically active, mirrors the concrete approaches used for handling the consequences of having AD in relation to being active; (2) perceptions of physical activity, reflect how their thoughts and beliefs regarding written and tacit norms encouraged them to remain physically active, and (3) physical activity as a means to well-being, alludes to feelings and emotions related to the performance of physical activity. Interpretation of the underlying patterns in these sub-themes revealed one overarching theme: Physical activity as a means to selfhood maintenance, which suggests that physical activity can help to shift the focus from the dementia diagnosis (i.e. ill health) to a more healthy and able self. 

Conclusion: The findings suggest that physical activity, apart from maintaining body functions, can be a way to sustain well-being and selfhood in mild AD. This aspect of physical activity is important to consider in research, policy and practice when addressing the needs of people with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keyword
dementia; interview; walking; qualitative; outdoor
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-15284 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2014.962004 (DOI)000353952000002 ()25265932 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-23 Created: 2014-09-09 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Leavy, B., Byberg, L., Michaelsson, K., Melhus, H. & Åberg, A. C. (2015). The fall descriptions and health characteristics of older adults with hip fracture: a mixed methods study. BMC Geriatrics, 15, Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fall descriptions and health characteristics of older adults with hip fracture: a mixed methods study
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2015 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In light of the multifactorial etiology of fall-related hip fracture, knowledge of fall circumstances may be especially valuable when placed in the context of the health of the person who falls. We aimed to investigate the circumstances surrounding fall-related hip fractures and to describe fall circumstances in relation to participants' health and functional characteristics.

Methods: The fall circumstances of 125 individuals (age >= 50 years) with hip fracture were investigated using semi-structured interviews. Data concerning participants' health (comorbidities and medications) and function (self-reported performance of mobility, balance, personal activities of daily living and physical activity, previous falls and hand grip strength) were collected via medical records, questionnaires and dynamometry. Using a mixed methods design, both data sets were analysed separately and then merged in order to provide a comprehensive description of fall events and identify eventual patterns in the data.

Results: Fall circumstances were described as i) Activity at the time of the fall: Positional change (n = 24, 19%); Standing (n = 16, 13%); Walking (n = 71, 57%); Balance challenging (n = 14, 11%) and ii) Nature of the fall: Environmental (n = 32, 26%); Physiological (n = 35, 28%); Activity-related indoor (n = 8, 6%) and outdoor (n = 8, 6%); Trips and slips on snow (n = 20, 16%) and in snow-free conditions (n = 12, 10%) and Unknown (n = 10, 8%). We observed the following patterns regarding fall circumstances and participants' health: those who fell i) during positional change had the poorest functional status; ii) due to environmental reasons (indoors) had moderate physical function, but high levels of comorbidity and fall risk increasing medications; iii) in snow-free environments (outdoors) appeared to have a poorer health and functional status than other outdoor groups.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that patterns exist in relation to the falls circumstances and health characteristics of people with hip fracture which build upon that previously reported. These patterns, when verified, can provide useful information as to the ways in which fall prevention strategies can be tailored to individuals of varying levels of health and function who are at risk for falls and hip fracture.

Keyword
hip fracture, fall circumstances, health and functional characteristics
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-17594 (URN)10.1186/s12877-015-0036-x (DOI)000354249000001 ()25887407 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-29 Created: 2015-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kirn, D., Koochek, A., Reid, K., von Berens, Å., Travison, T., Folta, S., . . . Fielding, R. (2015). The vitality, independence, and vigor in the elderly 2 study (VIVE2): design and methods. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 43, 164-171.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The vitality, independence, and vigor in the elderly 2 study (VIVE2): design and methods
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2015 (English)In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, ISSN 1551-7144, E-ISSN 1559-2030, Vol. 43, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nutritional supplementation may potentiate the increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis following exercise in healthy older individuals. Whether exercise and nutrition act synergistically to produce sustained changes in physical functioning and body composition has not been well studied, particularly in mobility-limited older adults.

Methods: The VIVE2 study was a multi-center, randomized controlled trial, conducted in the United States and Sweden. This study was designed to compare the effects of a 6-month intervention with a once daily, experimental, 4fl. oz. liquid nutritional supplement providing 150kcal, whey protein (20g), vitamin D (800IU) (Nestlé Health Science, Vevey, Switzerland), to a low calorie placebo drink (30kcal, non-nutritive; identical format) when combined with group-based exercise in 150 community-dwelling, mobility-limited older adults. All participants participated in a structured exercise program (3 sessions/week for 6months), which included aerobic, strength, flexibility, and balance exercises.

Results: The primary outcome was 6-month change in 400m walk performance (m/s) between supplement and placebo groups. Secondary outcomes included 6month change in: body composition, muscle cross-sectional area, leg strength, grip strength, stair climb time, quality of life, physical performance, mood/depressive symptoms and nutritional status. These outcomes were selected based on their applicability to the health and well-being of older adults.

Conclusions: The results of this study will further define the role of nutritional supplementation on physical functioning and restoration of skeletal muscle mass in older adults. Additionally, these results will help refine the current physical activity and nutritional recommendations for mobility-limited older adults.

Keyword
Older adults; Mobility-limitations; Physical activity; Protein; Vitamin D; Supplementation
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-17759 (URN)10.1016/j.cct.2015.06.001 (DOI)000360773200021 ()26044464 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8196-0553

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