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Klingberg-Allvin, M., Hatakka, M., Erlandsson, K., Osman, F., Byrskog, U. & Egal, J. (2019). "Change-makers in midwifery care": Exploring the differences between expectations and outcomes - a qualitative study of a midwifery net-based education programme in the Somali region. Midwifery, 69, 135-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Change-makers in midwifery care": Exploring the differences between expectations and outcomes - a qualitative study of a midwifery net-based education programme in the Somali region
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2019 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 69, p. 135-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to explore midwifery educators’ expected outcomes in the net-based master's programme, the programmes’ realised outcomes and the reported difference regarding the increased choices for the graduates and the effect on their agency.

Design

In this case study, we focused on a net-based master's programme in sexual and reproductive health in Somalia. Somalia suffers from a shortage of skilled birth attendants and there is a need for building up the capacity of midwifery educators.

Setting and participants

Data was collected in focus group discussions at the start of the programme and eight months after the students graduated. The data were analysed through the lens of the choice framework, which is based on the capability approach.

Findings

Findings show that many of the graduates’ expectations were met, while some were more difficult to fulfil. While the midwives’ choices and resource portfolios had improved because of their role as educators, the social structure prevented them from acting on their agency, specifically in regards to making changes at the social level. Several of the positive developments can be attributed to the pedagogy and structure of the programme.

Conclusion

The flexibility of net-based education gave the midwifery educators a new educational opportunity that they previously did not have. Students gained increased power and influence on some levels. However, they still lack power in government organisations where, in addition to their role as educators, they could use their skills and knowledge to change policies at the social level.

Keywords
Net-based education, Quality midwifery education, Midwifery care, Somaliland, Capability approach, Choice framework
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29004 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2018.11.007 (DOI)000454129800018 ()30503998 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057779256 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Erlandsson, K., Byrskog, U., Osman, F., Pedersen, C., Hatakka, M. & Klingberg-Allvin, M. (2019). Evaluating a model for the capacity building of midwifery eduators in Bangladesh through a blended, web-based master's programme. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1652022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating a model for the capacity building of midwifery eduators in Bangladesh through a blended, web-based master's programme
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2019 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1652022Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: While setting international standards for midwifery education has attracted considerable global attention, the education and training of midwifery educators has been relatively neglected, particularly in low-resource settings where capacity building is crucial. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the expectations of midwifery educators in Bangladesh who took part in a blended web-based master's programme in SRHR and the extent to which these were realized after 12 months of part-time study. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to collect data. A structured baseline questionnaire was distributed to all participants at the start of the first course (n = 30) and a second endpoint questionnaire was distributed after they (n = 29) had completed the core courses one year later. At the start of the first course, five focus group discussions (FGD) were held with the midwifery educators. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used for the analyses. Results: Midwifery educators who took part in the study identified expectations that can be grouped into three distinct areas. They hoped to become more familiar with technology, anticipated they would learn pedagogical and other skills that would enable them to better support their students' learning and thought they might acquire skills to empower their students as human beings. Participants reported they realized these ambitions, attributing the master's programme with helping them take responsibility for their own teaching and learning, showing them how to enhance their students' learning and how to foster reflective and critical thinking among them. Conclusions: Midwifery educators have taken part in a creative learning environment which has developed their engagement in teaching and learning. They have done this using a blended learning model which combines online learning with face-to-face contact. This model can be scaled up in low resource and remote settings.

Keywords
Bangladesh, Midwifery education, South Asia, capacity building, web-based education
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-30616 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1652022 (DOI)000480727300001 ()31411128 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071029632 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-09-17Bibliographically approved
Osman, F., Flacking, R., Klingberg-Allvin, M. & Schön, U.-K. (2019). Qualitative study showed that a culturally tailored parenting programme improved the confidence and skills of Somali immigrants. Acta Paediatrica, 108(8), 1482-1490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qualitative study showed that a culturally tailored parenting programme improved the confidence and skills of Somali immigrants
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 1482-1490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Parenting programmes tailored to immigrant parents have been reported to improve the mental health of the children and parents, as well as parents' sense of competence in parenting. However, research on parents' experiences of programmes tailored to their needs is scarce. This qualitative study aimed to describe Somali parents' experiences of how a culturally sensitive programme affected their parenting.

METHODS: The study was conducted in a middle-sized city in Sweden in 2015. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 50 participants two months after they took part in a parenting support programme. Inductive and deductive qualitative content analyses were used.

RESULTS: A light has been shed was a metaphor that emerged from the analysis and that captured the knowledge the parents gained from the parenting system in Sweden. Parents gained confidence in their parenting role and became emotionally aware of their child's social and emotional needs and how to respond to them. Holding the sessions in the participant's native language was important for the parents' participation and acceptance of the programme.

CONCLUSION: Parenting programmes should be tailored to the specific needs of the participants and cultural sensitivity should be factored into programmes to attract immigrant parents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
cultural sensitivity, effective parenting, family relationships, immigrants, parenting programmes
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29761 (URN)10.1111/apa.14788 (DOI)000474935600019 ()30896042 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064519588 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
Egeh, A.-A., Dugsieh, O., Erlandsson, K. & Osman, F. (2019). The views of Somali religious leaders on birth spacing: A qualitative study. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 20, 27-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The views of Somali religious leaders on birth spacing: A qualitative study
2019 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Birth spacing is an important health intervention for women to attain good physical and mental health. In Somalia, religious leaders play a decisive role in approving or rejecting the use of family planning.

Objective

The study aimed to investigate Somali Islamic religious leaders’ views on birth spacing.

Method

Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 17 Somali Islamic religious leaders aged 28–59 years and analysed through content analysis.

Results

The main category that emerged from the analysis was that the concept “birth spacing should be used and nor family planning to be in accordance with the Islamic religion. Two perspectives of views of birth spacing were identified: accepted ways and unaccepted ways. The accepted ways include breastfeeding, use of contraceptives causing no harm to the women’s health, and coitus interruptus. The preferred method should be determined by a joint agreement between the husband and wife, and that Muslim doctors should play a key role while the couples investigate their preferred method. Using contraceptives with the intention to limit the number of children was against Islamic values and practice. In addition, it was believed that using condoms promoted the temptation to engage in sex outside the marriage and was therefore prohibited.

Conclusion

According to the religious Islamic leaders, selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use is permitted in relation to birth spacing to promote the health of the mother and child. When providing professional contraceptive counselling to Muslim women, the word “birth spacing” is recommended to be used instead of “family planning”.

Keywords
Birth spacing, Contraceptives, Religious leaders, Reproductive health, Somalia
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29565 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2019.02.003 (DOI)000470192400006 ()31084814 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061449485 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open Access APC beslut 6/2019

Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Faysal Badal, N., Alo Yusuf, U., Egal, J., Pedersen, C., Erlandsson, K., Osman, F. & Byrskog, U. (2018). With knowledge and support women can attend antenatal care: the views of women in IDP camps in Somaliland. African Journal of Midwifery and Womens' Health, 12(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>With knowledge and support women can attend antenatal care: the views of women in IDP camps in Somaliland
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2018 (English)In: African Journal of Midwifery and Womens' Health, ISSN 1759-7374, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Somaliland, women’s perceptions of barriers to accessing antenatal care is sparsely described, particularly with regard to marginalized women. The aim was to investigate perceptions of barriers to accessing antenatal care from the perspective of pregnant women living in Internal Displaced Persons camps. Individual semi-structured interviews with fifteen women were conducted and analysed using content analysis. The overriding theme was “With knowledge and support, women can attend antenatal care”.  The findings highlighted that to obtain antenatal care, it is crucial for women to have knowledge and trust regarding antenatal services, a supporting environment, and ways to overcome practical barriers, such as patient fees and long waiting hours. If women and families received relevant information about the structure and benefits of ANC, they would probably prioritize ANC, given that the care is tailored to each woman’s needs. For this, community awareness and trust between women, families and ANC providers are central.

Keywords
Antenatal care, Content analysis, Somaliland
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26593 (URN)10.12968/ajmw.2018.12.3.138 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved
Abdillahi, H. A., Hassan, K. A., Kiruja, J., Osman, F., Egal, J. A., Klingberg-Allvin, M. & Erlandsson, K. (2017). A mixed-methods study of maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery at a referral hospital in Somaliland. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 138(1), 119-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A mixed-methods study of maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery at a referral hospital in Somaliland
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To explore maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery in Somaliland, including the impact of the prerequisite for family consent.

METHODS: A facility-based, mixed-methods study was conducted to assess all maternal near misses and deaths recorded at a referral hospital that provided services to women from all regions of Somaliland. The data sources comprised a quantitative prospective cross-sectional study using the WHO near-miss tool (performed from August 1 to December 31, 2015) and qualitative interviews with 17 healthcare providers working at the referral hospital who were in direct contact with the women in labor (performed from January 15 to March 15, 2015).

RESULTS: Of the 138 maternal near misses and deaths recorded, 50 (36%) were associated with emergency cesarean delivery. The most frequent maternal complication was severe pre-eclampsia (n=17; 34%), and the most frequent underlying causes were hypertensive disorders (n=31; 62%) and obstetric hemorrhage (n=15; 30%). Healthcare providers were often prevented from performing emergency cesarean delivery until the required consent had been received from the woman's extended family.

CONCLUSION: Maternity care in Somaliland must be improved, and the issue of legal authority for consent examined, to ensure both safe and timely provision of emergency cesarean delivery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Cesarean delivery, Consent, Maternal death, Near miss, Somaliland
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-24701 (URN)10.1002/ijgo.12176 (DOI)000405092600021 ()28391614 (PubMedID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2017-04-11 Created: 2017-04-11 Last updated: 2017-10-23Bibliographically approved
Osman, F., Salari, R., Klingberg-Allvin, M., Schön, U.-K. & Flacking, R. (2017). Effects of a culturally tailored parenting support programme in Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting: a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 7(12), Article ID e017600.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a culturally tailored parenting support programme in Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting: a randomised controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, article id e017600Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally tailored parenting support programme on Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting.

DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial.

SETTING: A city in the middle of Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: Somali-born parents (n=120) with children aged 11-16 years and self-perceived stress in their parenting were randomised to an intervention group (n=60) or a waiting-list control group (n=60).

INTERVENTION: Parents in the intervention group received culturally tailored societal information combined with the Connect parenting programme during 12 weeks for 1-2 hours per week. The intervention consisted of a standardised training programme delivered by nine group leaders of Somali background.

OUTCOME: The General Health Questionnaire 12 was used to measure parents' mental health and the Parenting Sense of Competence scale to measure parent satisfaction and efficacy in the parent role. Analysis was conducted using intention-to-treat principles.

RESULTS: The results indicated that parents in the intervention group showed significant improvement in mental health compared with the parents in the control group at a 2-month follow-up: B=3.62, 95% CI 2.01 to 5.18, p<0.001. Further, significant improvement was found for efficacy (B=-6.72, 95% CI -8.15 to -5.28, p<0.001) and satisfaction (B=-4.48, 95% CI -6.27 to -2.69, p<0.001) for parents in the intervention group. Parents' satisfaction mediated the intervention effect on parental mental health (β=-0.88, 95% CI -1.84 to -0.16, p=0.047).

CONCLUSION: The culturally tailored parenting support programme led to improved mental health of Somali-born parents and their sense of competence in parenting 2 months after the intervention. The study underlines the importance of acknowledging immigrant parents' need for societal information in parent support programmes and the importance of delivering these programmes in a culturally sensitive manner.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02114593.

Keywords
child protection, community child health, mental health, public health
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26770 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017600 (DOI)000423826700065 ()29222136 (PubMedID)
Note

Open Access APC beslut 26/2017

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Erlandsson, K., Osman, F., Hatakka, M., Egal, J. A., Byrskog, U., Pedersen, C. & Klingberg-Allvin, M. (2017). Evaluation of an online master’s programme in Somaliland. A phenomenographic study on the experience of professional and personal development among midwifery faculty. Nurse Education in Practice, 25, 96-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of an online master’s programme in Somaliland. A phenomenographic study on the experience of professional and personal development among midwifery faculty
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2017 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 25, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To record the variation of perceptions of midwifery faculty in terms of the possibilities and challenges related to the completion of their first online master's level programme in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Somaliland. The informants included in this phenomenongraphical focus group study were those well-educated professional women and men who completed the master's program. The informant perceived that this first online master's level programme provided tools for independent use of the Internet and independent searching for evidence-based information, enhanced professional development, was challenge-driven and evoked curiosity, challenged professional development, enhanced personal development and challenged context-bound career paths. Online education makes it possible for well-educated professional women to continue higher education. It furthermore increased the informants' confidence in their use of Internet, software and databases and in the use of evidence in both their teaching and their clinical practice. Programmes such as the one described in this paper could counter the difficulties ensuring best practice by having a critical mass of midwives who will be able to continually gather contemporary midwifery evidence and use it to ensure best practice. An increase of online education is suggested in South-central Somalia and in similar settings globally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Online education, Net-based education, Midwifery education, Human rights
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25050 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2017.05.007 (DOI)28575755 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019746618 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open Access APC beslut 15/2017

Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2017-06-21Bibliographically approved
Osman, F. (2017). Ladnaan : evaluation of a culturally tailored parenting support program to Somali-born parents. (Doctoral dissertation). Karolinska institutet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ladnaan : evaluation of a culturally tailored parenting support program to Somali-born parents
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Research shows that immigrant families encounter different complexities and challenges in a new host country, such as acculturation, isolation and lack of social support. These challenges have been shown to have negative impacts on immigrant families’ mental and emotional health, family function, parenting practices and parents’ sense of competence. Parental support programmes have been shown to positively affect parental skills, strengthen the parent-child relationship, and promote the mental health of parents and children. However, universal parenting support programmes face challenges in reaching and retaining immigrant parents. In addition, there is limited knowledge on the effectiveness of parenting support programmes among immigrant Somali-born parents and their children.

Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally tailored parenting support programme (Ladnaan intervention) on the mental health of Somali-born parents and their children. A further aim was to explore the parents’ experience of such a support programme on their parenting practises.

Methods: The thesis involved two explorative qualitative studies and one randomised controlled trial (RCT). Study I employed qualitative focus group discussions (FGDs) to explore Somali-born parents’ need for parenting support. Study II involved an RCT study in which 120 parents with children aged 11–16 years, and parents with self-perceived stress relating to their parenting were randomised to an intervention group or a wait-list control group. The Ladnaan intervention consisted of three components: societal information (two sessions), the Connect parenting programme (10 sessions), and a cultural sensitivity component. The Ladnaan intervention was delivered in the participants’ native language by group leaders of similar background and experience, and modifying the examples and role plays in the Connect programme. The primary outcome was a reduction in children’s emotional and behavioural problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Checklist 8-16. The secondary outcomes were improved mental health among parents, as assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12); and greater sense ofparenting competence, as measured by the Parent Sense of Competence (PSOC) scale. Study III comprises a qualitative study using individual semi-structured interviews (conducted two months after the Ladnaan intervention) to explore parents’ experiences of participating in a culturally tailored parenting support programme.

Results: The results in study I, shows that Somali-born parents encountered challenges in the host country, which impacted their confidence in parenting and the parent-child relationship. These challenges included insufficient knowledge of the parenting system and social obligations as a parent in the new host country. Other parental challenges in the host country included a stressful society, isolation, role changes, and parent-child power conflict. The Somali parents experienced opportunities to rethink and modify their parenting and strengthen their relationship with their children in the new country, but needed support from the local authority and others in these endeavours. In study II, the Ladnaan intervention showed that, according to the parents’ self-reports, children in the intervention group showed significantly decreased aggressive behaviour, social problems, attention problems, externalising ofbehavioural problems, and in total problems at the two-month follow-up. Moreover, parents in the intervention group showed significantly and clinically improved mental health and sense of competence in parenting at the two-month follow-up. The improved mental health of the parents could, in part, be explained by their satisfaction in parenting. In study III, parents who participated in the culturally tailored intervention programme reported that it enhanced their confidence in parenting and contributed to their ability to become emotionally aware and available for their children. The parents attributed this to the combination of societal information, the Connect programme, and the cultural sensitivity ofthe Ladnaan intervention, which were most supportive for their parenting. The culturally sensitive approach ofthe parenting programme (i.e., conducted in their native language by bicultural and bilingual group leaders) was viewed by the parents as valuable for their participation in the programme, as well as for modifying their parenting practices.

Conclusion: The culturally tailored parenting support programme helped parents overcome transition challenges related to social obligation as parents in the host country, and to modify their parenting orientation and styles in the new country. Furthermore, it improved the parents’ mental health and sense of competence in parenting, as well as reduced their children’s behavioural problems. When tailoring and delivering a parenting support programme to immigrant parents it is crucial to consider their specific needs and preferences and to ensure that the programme is culturally sensitive. Such an approach is more likely to contribute to participants’ engagement, retention, and acceptance of the parenting programme; and also improve their parenting practices and strengthen parent-child relationship, leading to improvements in children’s behaviour and parents’ mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karolinska institutet, 2017. p. 86
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26841 (URN)978-91-7676-881-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-12-08, Skandia salen (Q2:1), Astrid Lindgrens barnsjukhus, 10:29 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
Kiruja, J., Osman, F., Egal, J. A., Essén, B., Klingberg-Allvin, M. & Erlandsson, K. (2017). Maternal near-miss and death incidences – Frequencies, causes and the referral chain in Somaliland: A pilot study using the WHO near-miss approach. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 12, 30-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal near-miss and death incidences – Frequencies, causes and the referral chain in Somaliland: A pilot study using the WHO near-miss approach
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2017 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 30-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Somaliland is a self-declared country with a population of 3.5 million. Most of its population reside in rural areas. The objective of this pilot near-miss study was to monitor the frequency and causes of maternal near-miss and deaths and the referral chain for women to access Skilled Birth Attendants (SBA). Method: A facility-based study of all maternal near-miss and mortality cases over 5 months using the WHO near-miss tool in a main referral hospital. Reasons for bypassing the Antenatal Care facility (ANC) and late arrival to the referral hospital were investigated through verbal autopsy. Results: One hundred and thirty-eight (138) women with severe maternal complications were identified: 120 maternal near-miss, 18 maternal deaths. There were more near-miss cases on arrival (74.2%) compared with events that developed inside the hospital (25.8%). Likewise, there were more maternal deaths (77.8%) on arrival than was the case during hospitalization (22.2%). The most common mode of referral among maternal near-miss events was family referrals (66.7%). Of 18 maternal deaths, 15 were family referrals. Reasons for bypassing ANC were as follows: lack of confidence in the service provided; lack of financial resources; and lack of time to visit ANC. Reasons for late arrival to the referral hospital were as follows: lack of knowledge and transportation; and poor communication. Conclusion and clinical implication: To increase the utilization of ANC might indirectly lower the number of near-miss and death events. Collaboration between ANC staff and referral hospital staff and a more comprehensive near-miss project are proposed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords
Maternal death, Maternal near-miss, Referral chain, Somaliland
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-24581 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2017.02.003 (DOI)000401884100006 ()28477929 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85013803837 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2017-06-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0038-9402

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