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Pashkevich, Albina, Associate Professor in Tourism StudiesORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8134-5999
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Della Lucia, M. & Pashkevich, A. (2023). A sustainable afterlife for post-industrial sites: balancing conservation, regeneration and heritage tourism. European Planning Studies, 31(3), 641-661
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A sustainable afterlife for post-industrial sites: balancing conservation, regeneration and heritage tourism
2023 (English)In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 641-661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Giving industrial sites new life requires enabling change and overcoming change resistance. By cross-fertilizing relevant managerial and urban development literature, this study develops a theoretical and analytical framework that integrates several factors that can lead to the sustainable transformation of post-industrial sites. Case evidence collected using qualitative methods at the Great Copper Mountain WHS, Sweden, reveals a Managerial innovation model of industrial heritage regeneration which fails to fully engage the surrounding communities. This model is associated with early-stage post-industrial heritage tourism. The resistance, controversy and community misperceptions hindering the adaptive reuse of the site's industrial heritage and urban surrounds are mainly determined by institutional norms arising from the industrial monoculture. Change management entails working to dismantle lock-ins and empower change at different levels.

National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44700 (URN)10.1080/09654313.2022.2154141 (DOI)000893847200001 ()2-s2.0-85144076842 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-27 Created: 2022-12-27 Last updated: 2023-04-28Bibliographically approved
Hoarau-Heemstra, H., Pashkevich, A. & Wigger, K. (Eds.). (2023). Coastal tourism communities in transition: change practices, innovation, and governance for resilient futures. Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coastal tourism communities in transition: change practices, innovation, and governance for resilient futures
2023 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This special issue focusses on the transition of tourism in coastal communities to more resilient futures. A wide range of land- and marine tourism activities take place in coastal communities, and marine tourism, such as cruise tourism is often promoted as a way to develop the host communities and regional economies. Such communities are, however, particularly vulnerable to disturbances, unexpected shocks, and crises, such as climate change, depopulation, or pandemics. As well as identifying and developing desirable futures, communities need opportunities and activities, including tourism, that create economic value while sustaining livelihoods and restoring and preserving natural and social resources. Change practices, innovation, governance, and resilience are key themes and there is a need to critically rethink the connections between resilient communities and sustainable development in future.As the travel industry rebounds from the pandemic, it is expected that established coastal destinations will continue to grow and new destinations will emerge. While a great debate has emerged around the impacts of tourism on coastal communities and how to manage tourism development to ensure sustainability, we know relatively little about change practices of stakeholders directly affected by and involved in tourism development. Research has shown that, despite differences between communities, the way marine tourism activities are perceived by stakeholders, depends on the balance between different types of visitor segments (land-based, marine-based, organized, or individual travelers) and the development stage of the destination. There is a need for more knowledge on how communities develop change practices and innovate for sustainability and resilience as global anthropogenic transformations have made striving for sustainability more urgent and prominent. Consequently, understanding the environmental, economic, and socio-cultural impacts of tourism in coastal communities, is an important task that has recently been emphasized by several tourism researchers.

In this special issue we encourage an approach that invites many more actors than the tourism industries into a coastal tourism ontology, which allows for telling tourism not as a uni-dimensional ´tool´ for development or ´threat´ for nature and culture of coastal communities, but as a messy, distributed, and collaborative achievement and a process of making-with, becoming-with and thinking-with a much larger collective than the usual tourism stakeholders. By including many stories and identifying the ideological influences that are at work, we can ask whose interests are being served by a particular ideology.

This special issue is geared towards sharing research on the challenges and possibilities of tourism from the perspective of local communities in which it occurs. Academics so far only generated very few insights on how tourism communities are defining, governing, and implementing the principles of sustainability to prevent negative impacts, or to develop in a favorable direction. Consequently, there is a need to explore how local communities understand, engage with, and adapt to coastal tourism and sustainability, or even finding alternative paths to their future development. It therefore seems timely to examine the concepts of change practices, sustainability, resilience, innovation, and coastal community development at both organizational and community level. This call responds to the acknowledgement that tourism needs to be reoriented towards the public good, and that the types of tourism developed should be decided by the local community. We are therefore looking for voices from coastal tourism communities that discuss and imagine ways tourism can be developed to enable human, non-human and environmental wellbeing.

Accordingly, this call for papers seeks original and relevant conceptual and empirical papers on how coastal tourism activities offer opportunities and pose challenges for tourism and hospitality actors, communities, regions, and coastal environment and how these stakeholders adapt, change, and innovate accordingly. We would like to encourage a critical dialog regarding these aspects and engage in the discussions of possible futures for coastal regions, conserving the co-existing development of tourism and other economic sectors.

For this special issue we encourage submissions that that examine sustainability and resilience practices in the context of coastal, Arctic, and Nordic tourism and hospitality. Suggested research themes include but are not limited to:

• Tourism communities: resilience and sustainability• Mechanisms for promotion of the engagement of local stakeholders with coastal and/or marine tourism• Governance and management of marine tourism development• Innovation, knowledge and change management• Institutional entrepreneurship, social movement, and collective action of tourism stakeholders• Employment and labor markets in the context of coastal tourism and hospitality• Emerging, innovative or participatory research methods and methodologies• Community leadership and collaboration in tourism and across other economic sectors• Role of land-based tourism activities in the cruise tourism development: lessons learned and ways forward• Adaptations of coastal tourism development in the post pandemic era and risk management• Role of public and private sector collaboration in adaptations and crisis management in times of global pandemics

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
coastal communities, cruise tourism, tourism, Arctic
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-42279 (URN)
Available from: 2022-08-29 Created: 2022-08-29 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Avango, D., Lepy, E., Brännström, M., Heikkinen, H., Komu, T., Pashkevich, A. & Österlin, C. (2023). Heritage for the future – narrating abandoned mining sites. In: Sörlin Sverker (Ed.), Resource extraction and Arctic communities: the new extractivist paradigm. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heritage for the future – narrating abandoned mining sites
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2023 (English)In: Resource extraction and Arctic communities: the new extractivist paradigm / [ed] Sörlin Sverker, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2023Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2023
Keywords
mining heritage, copper mine, Älvsbyn municipality, Boliden
National Category
Human Geography Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-42276 (URN)9781009110044 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-08-29 Created: 2022-08-29 Last updated: 2023-05-05Bibliographically approved
Olsen, K. & Pashkevich, A. (2023). Selling the indigenous in Nordic welfare states: examples from Norway and Sweden. Current Issues in Tourism
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selling the indigenous in Nordic welfare states: examples from Norway and Sweden
2023 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Indigenous peoples’ right to control representations of their own culture and heritage is unquestionable, but in the case of tourism activities other stakeholders’ understandings come into play. The nation-state is still an important organizational foundation for tourism. For the Indigenous Sámi people, who are located in four different nation-states, national destination management organizations (DMOs) have a crucial role in how their culture and traditions are represented. The current study examines the content of Visit Norway and Visit Sweden’s visual marketing of indigenous Sámi tourism products. Using content analysis to sort electronic images and related texts, categories distinguishing natural, human, and other types of relevant symbols were created. The marketing strategies of both countries reinforce the traditional connection of the Sámi people to nature and their reindeer. Visit Sweden uses a distinct notion of what we call the artification of the Sámi, where young female artists contribute to the modern image of this indigenous people. Visit Norway continues to use more stereotypical representations of the Sámi, with a focus on colourful outfits and traditional buildings. Thus, tourism marketing continues to reinforce simplified images of the indigenous populations of the Arctic and their relation to the nation-state. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Arctic tourism, indigenous people, representations, Sami tourism, visit Norway, visit Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-46165 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2023.2217352 (DOI)000995344600001 ()2-s2.0-85160762843 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-12 Created: 2023-06-12 Last updated: 2023-07-31Bibliographically approved
Avango, D., Pashkevich, A. & Rodon, T. (2022). The making and re-making of high modernist towns in the Circumpolar North. The Extractive Industries and Society, 12, Article ID 101191.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The making and re-making of high modernist towns in the Circumpolar North
2022 (English)In: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 12, article id 101191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we explore the fate of high modernist architecture and settlement planning in the North, through the lens of mining towns in Sweden and Quebec. After WW2, cities across the world were subject to a wave of restructuring in accordance with high modernist ideals. The circumpolar north became the subject of some of the most radical examples, often described as utopian. In the Swedish Arctic, a renowned architect Ralph Erskine played a leading role. He combined functionalist principles, with ideas of creating settlements protecting inhabitants from harsh Arctic conditions, in harmony with the environment. Erskine...s ideas were implemented to a different extent in Kiruna and Svappavaara in north Sweden in the 1960's and in Fermont, Quebec, in the early 1970...s. Our aim is to understand the challenges of creating industrial settlements in the Arctic, with the capacity to attract employees that are needed for resource extraction and other industries. While Erskine's architecture in Svappavaara and Kiruna will be demolished, the wall shaped town in Fermont is still intact and expanding. By comparing and highlighting differences, we call attention to the threat of demolition of legacies of an era that has yet to be defined as cultural heritage.

Keywords
Mining towns, Modernist architecture, Ralph Erskine, Sweden, Canada, Norrbotten, Quebec
National Category
Architecture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44777 (URN)10.1016/j.exis.2022.101191 (DOI)000907614900002 ()2-s2.0-85143269353 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-30 Created: 2022-12-30 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Ren, C., James, L., Pashkevich, A. & Hoarau-Heemstra, H. (2021). Cruise trouble. A practice-based approach to studying Arctic cruise tourism. Tourism Management Perspectives, 40, Article ID 100901.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cruise trouble. A practice-based approach to studying Arctic cruise tourism
2021 (English)In: Tourism Management Perspectives, ISSN 2211-9736, E-ISSN 2211-9744, Vol. 40, article id 100901Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cruise arrivals in the Arctic often take place in small coastal communities. Although there may be economic benefits for these communities, these are often counterbalanced by social and environmental stresses. In this article, we ask how we can tend to Arctic cruise tourism development using Haraway's concept of staying with the trouble. As a way to bridge often polarized views on cruise tourism as either an economic tool or a destructive force, we propose a practice-based research approach to engage with the complexities of cruise tourism. The aim is to foster response-abililty for Arctic cruise communities to live (better) with cruise tourism. We argue that practice-based approaches help researchers 'stay with the trouble' as it is rooted in everyday experiences and the materiality of cruise destinations. Also, its flat ontology supports a 'tinkering' approach to cruise practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Arctic cruise tourism, Theories of practice, Arctic communities, staying with the trouble, Cruise communities
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-39145 (URN)10.1016/j.tmp.2021.100901 (DOI)000718175900007 ()2-s2.0-85118552342 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-20 Created: 2021-12-20 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Keskitalo, E. C., Schilar, H., Heldt Cassel, S. & Pashkevich, A. (2021). Deconstructing the indigenous in tourism: The production of indigeneity in tourism-oriented labelling and handicraft/souvenir development in Northern Europe. Current Issues in Tourism, 24(1), 16-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deconstructing the indigenous in tourism: The production of indigeneity in tourism-oriented labelling and handicraft/souvenir development in Northern Europe
2021 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 16-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In literature on tourism in northern or ‘Arctic’ areas and on regions and places in northern areas, terms such as ‘indigenous’ and ‘non-indigenous’ are often used to distinguish people and places from each other. The aim of this paper is to deconstruct the ‘indigenous’/‘non-indigenous’ categories as well as the geographical categories to which they are linked, using examples from tourism in northern Fennoscandia and northwest Russia, selected as areas with circumstances that vary greatly both locally and regionally. Specific focus is on the construction of labels and restrictions of use, particularly regarding handicrafts/souvenirs as a specific object of indigeneity to separate it from other objects. The study reviews the processes in tourism for constructing, labelling, and valuing – and thereby also exerting power upon – specific conceptions, and thereby also on the contesting of such processes amongst broader, but often unacknowledged, local groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-31306 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2019.1696285 (DOI)000501482400001 ()2-s2.0-85076417562 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Pashkevich, A. & de Bernardi, C. (2021). Revitalising Swedish countryside through food: Local food events in Dalarna. In: Gronau, W. Bonadei, R. Kastenholz, E. and A. Pashkevich (Ed.), E-Cul-Tours: Enhancing Networks in Heritage Tourism. Rome: Tab edizioni
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revitalising Swedish countryside through food: Local food events in Dalarna
2021 (English)In: E-Cul-Tours: Enhancing Networks in Heritage Tourism / [ed] Gronau, W. Bonadei, R. Kastenholz, E. and A. Pashkevich, Rome: Tab edizioni , 2021Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Rome: Tab edizioni, 2021
Keywords
food events, Dalarna, rural tourism, food, local networks, stakeholders
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-36189 (URN)978-88-31352-30-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-02-18 Created: 2021-02-18 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Pashkevich, A. & Scott, D. (2021). Surviving and Thriving in Southern Dalarna, Sweden: Pandemic Stories from a Food Network. In: : . Paper presented at Regional Studies Association "Regions in Recovery Building Sustainable Futures - Global E-Festival", Online 2-18 June 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surviving and Thriving in Southern Dalarna, Sweden: Pandemic Stories from a Food Network
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study, we present data from a study exploring local food entrepreneurs understanding of the impacts arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The study took place in the Dalarna province, one of Sweden's most important tourism regions. Earlier studies from this area identified an emerging local food network that has become an integral part of the Southern part of the Dalarna province's (contested) touristic landscape. The established network gained traction in 2006 with a special event organised as a "Harvest Party" (Skördefest in Swedish) (Scott & Pashkevich, 2019).As research has shown, food is no longer merely a support function that facilitates tourism but has become a significant attraction. This rise in demand for food experiences in tourism is part of a broader societal and cultural narrative where food (for many) is no longer merely sustenance but a vital leisure pursuit (Scott and Duncan, 2020). Importantly, we situate the production and consumption of food as contested spaces where individual and collective identities are represented and re-represented through often diverging ethics and morals. One of the conclusions based on our previous investigations of local food entrepreneurs' motives to become part of the was that the food festival was a way to mobilise local inhabitants and enhance the sense of solidarity both among the villagers and those involved in the broader agricultural sector.Our follow-up study's preliminary results show that the summer season of 2020 has revealed unexpected but exciting impacts of the pandemic. The 2020 "Harvest Party" was more successful than ever, returning a year-on-year increase in turnover and visitors of over 40%. The event organisers proudly reported that they had adapted appropriate practices regarding pandemic, and restrictions were rigorously adhered to, including adherence to social distancing. Many producers claimed that conditions caused by the pandemic influenced the core of the local food experience. Furthermore, visitors encounters and interactions with regional food culture were noticeably different.The circumstances of this year's event, taking place during a pandemic, resulted in new knowledge that members openly shared. This open sharing has facilitated future collaborative opportunities, including a discussion to prolong the season for the first time. By sharing knowledge and experiences, members collectively realise that the event is attractive to local folk and second homeowners and urban visitors interested in the place(s) in which the members live and work. In moving their focus outside the 'local', they recognise (from bottom-up) opportunities for tourist-driven development.

National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-38228 (URN)
Conference
Regional Studies Association "Regions in Recovery Building Sustainable Futures - Global E-Festival", Online 2-18 June 2021
Available from: 2021-09-24 Created: 2021-09-24 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Ren, C., Jóhannesson, G. T., Kramvig, B., Pashkevich, A. & Höckert, E. (2021). Twenty years of research on Arctic and Indigenous cultures in Nordic tourism: a review and future research agenda. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, 21(1), 111-121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Twenty years of research on Arctic and Indigenous cultures in Nordic tourism: a review and future research agenda
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2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 111-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-35467 (URN)10.1080/15022250.2020.1830433 (DOI)000577358400001 ()2-s2.0-85092615075 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-23 Created: 2020-11-23 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Projects
Processes of representation in indigenous tourism development. Cases from reindeer husbandry areas in northern Sweden and northwest Russia [2012-176_Formas]; Umeå UniversityGruvindustrins kulturarv som resurser för hållbara samhällen: lärdomar för Sverige från Arktis; Publications
Avango, D., Lepy, E., Brännström, M., Heikkinen, H., Komu, T., Pashkevich, A. & Österlin, C. (2023). Heritage for the future – narrating abandoned mining sites. In: Sörlin Sverker (Ed.), Resource extraction and Arctic communities: the new extractivist paradigm. Cambridge: Cambridge University PressHeikkinen, H., Rastad Bjørst, L. & Pashkevich, A. (2020). Challenging Tourism Landscapes of Southwest Greenland: Identifying Social and Cultural Capital for Sustainable Tourism Development. Arctic Anthropology, 57(2), 212-228
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8134-5999

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