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Artursson Wissa, Ulrika
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Anderson, M., Artursson Wissa, U., Avdic, A., Oom Gardtman, U. & Skogbergs, A. (2018). Formativ feedback i högre utbildning: Inventering, förslag och organisatorisk implementering. Borlänge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formativ feedback i högre utbildning: Inventering, förslag och organisatorisk implementering
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Borlänge: , 2018
Keywords
feedback, respons, återkoppling, bedömning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29728 (URN)
Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Anderson, M., Artursson Wissa, U., Avdic, A., Oom Gardtman, U. & Skogbergs, A. (2018). Formativ feedback i högre utbildning: Inventering, förslag och organisatorisk implementering. In: : . Paper presented at NU2018, Det akademiska lärarskapet, Västerås, 9-11 oktober 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formativ feedback i högre utbildning: Inventering, förslag och organisatorisk implementering
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2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Keywords
feedback, respons, återkoppling, bedömning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29731 (URN)
Conference
NU2018, Det akademiska lärarskapet, Västerås, 9-11 oktober 2018
Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Artursson Wissa, U. & Avdic, A. (2017). Flexible study pace, mental disabilities and e-Learning: Perceived problems and opportunities. In: Anabela Mesquita & Paula Peres (Ed.), Proceedings of 16th European Conference on e-Learning, Porto, Portugal, October 26-27 2017.: . Paper presented at 16th European Conference on e-Learning, Porto, Portugal, October 26-27 2017 (pp. 527-534). Reading, UK
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexible study pace, mental disabilities and e-Learning: Perceived problems and opportunities
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of 16th European Conference on e-Learning, Porto, Portugal, October 26-27 2017. / [ed] Anabela Mesquita & Paula Peres, Reading, UK, 2017, p. 527-534Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Flexible study pace distant courses provide opportunities for students with disabilities to attend courses in higher educations as opposed to campus courses with fixed schedules. At least that is what we believe. This study investigates how mentally disabled students perceive taking distant courses with flexible pace and also how their teachers perceive opportunities and challenges. Flexible pace means here distant courses where students can start when they like and keep the pace they prefer. The courses in question are part of a two year program of eService Development at Dalarna University in Sweden. The program was launched in 2006 and admits ca 50-80 students each semester. Many of the students are unable to take campus courses of various reasons such as living far from universities, working daytime, etc. We sent out questionnaires to students with disabilities and to teachers asking them semi structured questions about perceived challenges and opportunities regarding the studies. The students had mental disabilities such as Dyslexia, ADHD, Asperger syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Social Phobia. The answers have been analyzed qualitatively by categorizing the answers firstly in groups of challenges and opportunities and further on in sub categories. Our finding shows that the flexible aspect is especially important to students as it gives them the opportunity to adjust their studying practices to their disabilities. Our conclusions are that the flexible study pace approach (FreeStartFreePace) is suitable for students with nonlinear work. It is also useful for students with mental disabilities who could have a problem adapting to schedules and conforming procedures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading, UK: , 2017
Keywords
FreeStartFreePace, flexible learning, free pace learning, distance learning, mentally disabled students, challenges, opportunities
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26487 (URN)978-1-911218-60-9 (ISBN)
Conference
16th European Conference on e-Learning, Porto, Portugal, October 26-27 2017
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2017-11-01Bibliographically approved
Avdic, A., Artursson Wissa, U. & Hatakka, M. (2016). Socratic flipped classroom: What types of questions and tasks promote learning?. In: Jarmila Novotna & Antonin Jancarik (Ed.), Proceedings of the 15th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2016: . Paper presented at 15th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2016. Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic 27-28 October 2016 (pp. 41-48). Reading UK
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socratic flipped classroom: What types of questions and tasks promote learning?
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 15th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2016 / [ed] Jarmila Novotna & Antonin Jancarik, Reading UK, 2016, p. 41-48Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Socratic questioning stresses the importance of questioning for learning. Flipped Classroom pedagogy generates a need for effective questions and tasks in order to promote active learning. This paper describes a project aimed at finding out how different kinds of questions and tasks support students’ learning in a flipped classroom context. In this study, during the flipped courses, both the questions and tasks were distributed together with video recordings. Answers and solutions were presented and discussed in seminars, with approximately 10 participating students in each seminar. Information Systems students from three flipped classroom courses at three different levels were interviewed in focus groups about their perceptions of how different kinds of questions and tasks supported their learning process. The selected courses were organized differently, with various kinds of questions and tasks. Course one included open questions that were answered and presented at the seminar. Students also solved a task and presented the solution to the group. Course two included open questions and a task. Answers and solutions were discussed at the seminars where students also reviewed each other’s answers and solutions. Course three included online single- and multiple choice questions with real-time feedback. Answers were discussed at the seminar, with the focus on any misconceptions. In this paper we categorized the questions in accordance with Wilson (2016) as factual, convergent, divergent, evaluative, or a combination of these. In all, we found that any comprehensible question that initiates a dialogue, preferably with a set of Socratic questions, is perceived as promoting learning. This is why seminars that allow such questions and discussion are effective. We found no differences between the different kinds of Socratic questions. They were seen to promote learning so long as they made students reflect and problematize the questions. To conclude, we found that questions and tasks promote learning when they are answered and solved in a process that is characterized by comprehensibility, variation, repetition and activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading UK: , 2016
Series
Proceedings on the European Conference of e-Learning, ISSN 2048-8637
Keywords
Flipped classroom, questions, tasks, Socratic questioning
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, General Microdata Analysis - others
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-23451 (URN)978-1-911218-17-3 (ISBN)
Conference
15th European Conference on e-Learning ECEL 2016. Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic 27-28 October 2016
Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-23 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved
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