Dalarna University's logo and link to the university's website

du.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Farsari, I., Bakker, M. & Carvalho, L. (2023). Climate change and tourism: scholars’ reflections on transformative research. Anatolia: An International Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and tourism: scholars’ reflections on transformative research
2023 (English)In: Anatolia: An International Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Research, ISSN 1303-2917, E-ISSN 2156-6909Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47320 (URN)10.1080/13032917.2023.2276955 (DOI)001104275100001 ()2-s2.0-85176956125 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-28 Created: 2023-11-28 Last updated: 2023-12-11
Elbe, J. & Farsari, I. (2023). Do we need a new airport in the Mountains?: An analysis of soft and strong sustainability arguments. In: Mathias Cöster, Sabine Gebert Persson & Owe Ronström (Ed.), Enabling Sustainable Visits: (pp. 53-78). Visby: Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do we need a new airport in the Mountains?: An analysis of soft and strong sustainability arguments
2023 (English)In: Enabling Sustainable Visits / [ed] Mathias Cöster, Sabine Gebert Persson & Owe Ronström, Visby: Uppsala University, 2023, p. 53-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Visby: Uppsala University, 2023
National Category
Other Social Sciences Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47263 (URN)978-91-506-3014-5 (ISBN)978-91-506-3023-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-17 Created: 2023-11-17 Last updated: 2023-12-11Bibliographically approved
Farsari, I. (2023). Exploring the nexus between sustainable tourism governance, resilience and complexity research. Tourism Recreation Resarch, 48(3), 352-367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the nexus between sustainable tourism governance, resilience and complexity research
2023 (English)In: Tourism Recreation Resarch, ISSN 0250-8281, E-ISSN 2320-0308, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 352-367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Governance and complexity have increasingly become subjects of interest within research on sustainable tourism. Governance has been marked by a turn to more corporatist and networked policymaking structures. At the same time, the use of the concept of complexity in research on tourism destinations and governance is gaining momentum in an effort to address the links in increasingly networked systems as well as the interrelatedness of the multiple features of a tourist destination. Meanwhile, resilience has emerged as a new buzzword in research on sustainable development and governance which denotes the ability of a destination to cope with and adapt to change. This article reviews the literature on destination governance to identify critical issues and trends and discusses the relevance of complexity approaches. Evolutionary studies and research on resilience in a sustainability context are becoming part of this discussion. The review sheds light on the limitations and merits of each of these concepts, as well as on their nexus. The article concludes with some key areas for future research on destination governance. The aim of the review is to contribute to conceptual clarity and to advance the application of complexity approaches in research on destination governance.

Keywords
Destination governance; sustainability; complex adaptive systems; resilience
National Category
Other Social Sciences Social and Economic Geography Political Science Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-36889 (URN)10.1080/02508281.2021.1922828 (DOI)000651705800001 ()2-s2.0-85106055744 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-18 Created: 2021-05-18 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Farsari, I. & Persson-Fischier, U. (2022). Climate change and sustainable tourism in the new normal: How can we learn from the Covid-19 pandemic?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and sustainable tourism in the new normal: How can we learn from the Covid-19 pandemic?
Show others...
2022 (English)Report (Other academic)
Keywords
climate change, sustainable destination, new normal, codesign
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44271 (URN)
Note

The project was cofinanced by Tillväxtverket

Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Conti, E. & Farsari, I. (2022). Disconnection in nature-based tourism experiences: an actor-network theory approach. Annals of Leisure Research, 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disconnection in nature-based tourism experiences: an actor-network theory approach
2022 (English)In: Annals of Leisure Research, ISSN 1174-5398, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Recent studies question whether ubiquitous connectivity via mobiles represents an enhancer and facilitator in nature-based tourism experiences or a potential destructor to disconnect from. We argue that extant research approaches cannot fully grasp the complexity of the connectivity-disconnection dilemma, specifically how tourists appropriate, reinterpret, reshape, and negotiate with meanings inscribed in mobiles and how such negotiations link to valuations of nature-based experiences. This research adopts an interpretivist approach and uses actor-network theory to investigate negotiations of connectivity and their experiential meanings through field interviews in Fulufjället National Park, Sweden. Results reveal translations of social connectivity, facilitation of information and orientation as thematic cores of tourists’ embodiments of mobile connectivity. Results also show how the comprehensive tourismscape where such embodiments find meaning contributes to tourists’ definitions of disconnection. Such definitions comprise human and non-human actors on site, off site, and cannot be exhausted by essentialist dualisms between being plugged and unplugged.

Keywords
disconnection, actor network theory, nature-based tourism, digital free travel, national parks, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-43937 (URN)10.1080/11745398.2022.2150665 (DOI)000893831000001 ()2-s2.0-85143308440 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Interreg IngoSkog project
Available from: 2022-12-09 Created: 2022-12-09 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Farsari, I. (2022). Pedagogy for sustainable tourism: reflections on the curriculum space of a master programme in Sweden. Journal of Teaching in Travel & Tourism, 22(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogy for sustainable tourism: reflections on the curriculum space of a master programme in Sweden
2022 (English)In: Journal of Teaching in Travel & Tourism, ISSN 1531-3220, E-ISSN 1531-3239, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tourism education has matured from vocational to more liberal education while current trends underline the importance of critical studies and the shift of curricula to more action-oriented forms of education and citizenship education. However, a gap can be noticed between theory and practice in the development of pedagogy for sustainable tourism. The research reported here draws from debates in tourism education, education for sustainability, critical studies, and education for citizenship to develop a conceptual framework for pedagogy for sustainable tourism. This framework is used to reflect on the curriculum space of a master programme in tourism in Sweden in an analytic autoethnographic approach. The analysis indicates that the master programme addresses several aspects of the reflective vocational and reflective liberal curriculum space. It would also benefit from the integration of more experiential, action-oriented learning to strengthen the communal understanding of civil action and education for citizenship. This research contributes to the conceptualisation of the curriculum space for sustainable tourism. Such efforts are considered especially important in acknowledging the complex, dynamic character of tourism higher education. The aim is to invite a dialogue about the reform and evolution of tourism education to meet the needs for a sustainable future.

Keywords
Higher education; sustainable tourism pedagogy, critical pedagogy, education for citizenship, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-38754 (URN)10.1080/15313220.2021.1978127 (DOI)000702553700001 ()2-s2.0-85115381084 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-11 Created: 2021-11-11 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Farsari, I. (2021). Climate change and sustainable tourism in the new normal. In: Tourism 21: Re-building Tourism – Continuities and Changes: . Paper presented at ATLAS Annual Conference 2021 “Tourism 21: Re-building Tourism – Continuities and Changes”, AMBIS University, Prague, Czech Republic, 7 - 10 September, 2021 (online).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and sustainable tourism in the new normal
2021 (English)In: Tourism 21: Re-building Tourism – Continuities and Changes, 2021Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The world is experiencing an unpresented health, social, and economic crisis situation with tourism reported to be one of the most severely hit sectors (UNWTO, 2020). COVID-19 pandemic is often discussed as an imposed pause of humanity’s frantic growth and an opportunity to reflect on our choices and future paths, an invitation to tourists and the industry to reconsider their options and adopt more sustainable practices in the after COVID-19 era (Gretzel et al., 2020; Ioannides and Gyimóthy, 2020) a view shared also by UNWTO claiming that “sustainability should be the new normal” in the after covid era (https://www.unwto.org/covid-19-oneplanet-responsible-recovery).. COVID-19 crisis although reduced or even eliminated tourism and travel opportunities for certain periods, it has also contributed to the first in history reduction in greenhouse gas emissions related to reduced travels and industrial production (Gössling et al., 2020).  As the world is now focusing in mitigating the adverse impacts of the pandemic and bringing economy and tourism ‘back to business’, there are also alarming voices that measures taken in the pressure of emergency to combat economic recession from COVID-19 should not contradict or jeopardise with long-term sustainability goals and SDGs should not be overlooked or neglected (Hall et al., 2020).  Besides the problems created, crises can be a disruption leading to innovations. It is a period of transition and innovation to combat a rapid crisis such as the pandemic while some of these actions and innovations, if adjusted adequately, can be useful in the long run to combat the less visible slow crisis like climate change and other sustainability challenges. In this research we look on knowledge and experience generated during the pandemic crisis to attain a more sustainable development of tourism now but very importantly in the “new normal” after the crisis. We look onto how companies in Dalarna and Gotland have responded to the pandemic so far and how they work with sustainability and climate change. In this presentation I want to explore the idea of cocreating knowledge with companies. How can we engage companies? What is relevant research for them? How can we help them towards a transformational approach to embrace sustainability?

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-38748 (URN)
Conference
ATLAS Annual Conference 2021 “Tourism 21: Re-building Tourism – Continuities and Changes”, AMBIS University, Prague, Czech Republic, 7 - 10 September, 2021 (online)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth
Available from: 2021-11-09 Created: 2021-11-09 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Conti, E. & Farsari, I. (2021). Disconnection as a performative act in nature-based tourism experiences. In: INVTUR2021 online Conference, University of Aveiro, Portugal, May 6-7 2021: . Paper presented at INVTUR2021 online Conference, University of Aveiro, Portugal, May 6-7 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disconnection as a performative act in nature-based tourism experiences
2021 (English)In: INVTUR2021 online Conference, University of Aveiro, Portugal, May 6-7 2021, 2021Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objectives 

A large part of the growing body of literature on the use of ICTs  and mobile technologies in tourism has examined the adaption and embracement of mobile technologies in tourism and the impact it brings in tourist experiences, often in advocative approaches (Neuhofer, Buhalis & Ladkin, 2012; Buhalis & Foerste, 2015). Nevertheless, an increasing number of authors have been commenting on the disruptive character of these technologies with the research pointing to the tourists’ loss of sense of place, disengagement and alienation caused by the perceived invasiveness of technology on the overall nature-based experience (Silas et al. 2016, White & White 2007, Gretzel 2010, Tribe & Mkono 2017). Although trends related to disconnection have been acknowledged in the form of ‘digital detox’ and ‘digital switch-off’ holidays (Elmahdy, Haukeland & Fredman, 2017; Gretzel, 2014), a relatively limited number of studies has looked into tourists desire to “disconnect” from ICTs and mobile connectivity in nature-based tourist experience (Dickinson et al. 2016; Paris et al. 2015). Current research regarding connectedness and disconnectedness in tourism experiences has followed rather dualistic, dichotomising approaches. For example, research has looked into the enforced disconnectedness as experienced in “technology dead zones” or as deliberate disconnectedness in technology-free zones (Pearce and Gretzel 2012); or technology as a barrier or an opportunity in experiencing the natural environment (Dickinson et al 2016). Dickinson et al. discussed also the dilemma of ‘to use or not to use’ mobile technologies as a “double edge sword” (p. 196) as experienced by users in campsites.ICT and mobile technology use and value creation in nature-based experiences along with the negotiation of tourists’ connectivity is a relatively understudied topic which would require further investigation (Dickinson et al. 2016; Gundersen & Frivold 2008; Vespestad & Lindberg 2011).

In this paper, we examine connectedness and disconnectedness in nature-based experiences as positions in a continuum. Instead of examining mobile technology use in nature-based activities as something inherently “good” or “bad” which either advances or destructs the experience, we try to understand the different positioning that tourists can have on a continuum, which embrace both disconnection and connectivity as performative valuing acts (Baka 2015). In doing so, we move from the dominant post-positivist approaches of technology (Munar et al. 2013), which are reflected on how connectivity and disconnection are investigated in nature-based tourism. By adopting a performative view, we examine how and why subjective ideas of disconnection and connection are constructed and performed within the tourist experience of natural areas. This could contribute to answering the question of how disconnection is subjectively negotiated with being connected (Dickinson et al. 2016; Neuhorfer 2016). 

Methodology Qualitative, semi-structured interviews at international visitors in Fulufjället National Park, Sweden, was the method of data collection. Interviews took place right after their visit to the park and were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. A total of 36 interviewees were part of this research.

Main Results and Contributions Preliminary analysis indicate that tourists seek for some control over their connectivity while outdoors in the park. Although a clear articulation of the need to disconnect has been expressed during interviews, this is negotiated from complete disconnectedness to partial one, allowing information, orientation and safety reasons to use it. Furthermore, this negotiated disconnectedness was found to form part of a broader disconnectedness from their every-day life. Disconnecting from their mobiles and technology act as a performance of their escapism from their ordinary lives and work. This is better understood as a performative act of disconnecting from ordinary life and connecting back to nature and the inner self.

Limitations 

This research builds on a limited number of interviews in a single case-study. Further research would be necessitated to explore further the findings. The findings offer also the ground for the development of further quantitative surveys.

Conclusions 

This research contributes to a rather understudied field, that of ICT and mobile connectivity use in nature-based experiences with empirical data from Sweden. The resulting knowledge contributes to a better understanding on the mediating role of ICTs as contributors or destructors in nature-based experiences and visitors value creation in these experiences. At a theoretical level, the research introduces the notion of a continuum in connectedness/disconnectedness in nature-based activities and the understanding of it as a performative act.

References 

Baka, V. (2015). Understanding valuing devices in tourism through “place-making”. Valuation Studies, 3(2), 149-180.

Buhalis, D., & Foerste, M. (2015). SoCoMo marketing for travel and tourism: Empowering co-creation of value. Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, 4(3), 151-161.

Dickinson, J. E., Hibbert, J. F., & Filimonau, V. (2016). Mobile technology and the tourist experience: (Dis)connection at the campsite. Tourism Management, 57, 193–201

Elmahdy, Y. M., Haukeland, J. V., & Fredman, P. (2017). Tourism megatrends, a literature review focused on nature-based tourism. MINA fagrapport 32, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

Gretzel, U. (2010). Travel in the network: Redirected gazes, ubiquitous connections and new frontiers. Post-global network and everyday life, 41–58.

Gretzel, U. (2014). Travel Unplugged: The case of Lord Howe Island, Australia. In Proceedings of the TTRA Canada annual conference. Yellowknife, Canada, september 24–26. 

Gundersen, V. S., & Frivold, L. H. (2008). Public preferences for forest structures: a review of quantitative surveys from Finland, Norway and Sweden. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 7(4), 241-258.

Munar, A. M., Gyimóthy, S., & Cai, L. (Eds.) (2013). Tourism social media: Transformations in identity, community and culture. Emerald Group Publishing.

Neuhofer, B., Buhalis, D. & Ladkin, A., (2012). Conceptualising technology enhanced destination experiences. Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, 1(1-2), 36-46.

Neuhofer, B. (2016). Value co-creation and co-destruction in connected tourist experiences. In Information and communication technologies in tourism 2016 (pp. 779-792). Springer, Cham. 

Silas, E., Løvlie, A. S., & Ling, R. (2016). The smartphone’s role in the contemporary backpacking experience. Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network, 9(6), 40–55.

Tribe, J., & Mkono, M. (2017). Not such smart tourism? The concept of e-lienation. Annals of Tourism Research, 66, 105–115.

Vespestad, M. K., & Lindberg, F. (2011). Understanding nature-based tourist experiences: An ontological analysis. Current Issues in Tourism, 14(6), 563-580.

White, N. R., & White, P. B. (2007). Home and away: Tourists in a connected world. Annals of Tourism Research, 34(1), 88–104.

Keywords
Connectivity, Disconnectedness, mobile technology, nature-based experiences, performative
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, INGO Skog (Innovation för grön omställning i skogen)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-36891 (URN)
Conference
INVTUR2021 online Conference, University of Aveiro, Portugal, May 6-7 2021
Available from: 2021-05-18 Created: 2021-05-18 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Poort, M., Broker-Bulling, F., Farsari, I. & Persson-Fischier, U. (2021). Experiences of Coping with Covid Early in the Pandemic: Evidence from Sweden and the USA. In: Regions in Recovery: Building Sustainable Futures - Global E-Festival. June 02- 18, 2021: . Paper presented at Regions in Recovery: Building Sustainable Futures - Global E-Festival. June 02- 18, 2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Coping with Covid Early in the Pandemic: Evidence from Sweden and the USA
2021 (English)In: Regions in Recovery: Building Sustainable Futures - Global E-Festival. June 02- 18, 2021, 2021Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Covid-19 pandemic has turned into a global crisis, the impacts of which are being felt around the world. Tourism and hospitality is one of the most severely hit sectors with many arguing that this is a period for fundamental transformations towards a new normal in the industry. There are also voices, however, who argue for a bouncing back and the recapturing of lost ground as soon as the circumstances allow. At the time of writing this abstract, several countries were experiencing a third wave with limited knowledge however on the impacts and experiences from the first wave.This research is on two destinations, one in Sweden and one in the USA. The two countries have followed quite different approaches in the management of the pandemic. We performed in-depth interviews with tourism businesses and actors in the two destinations with the aim of understanding their reactions and their experiences at an early stage of the pandemic. Interviews took place in spring 2020 when most of the world was still in lockdown. We try to understand how companies in an island summer destination in the Baltic Sea and in a nature-based destination in the USA are coping and negotiating their future early in the pandemic. Uncertainty was evident among interviewees. Uncertainty was related to lack of knowledge about the future and how to cope with and manage their business in light of that. Uncertainty was experienced also as anxiety over the survival of their business or even the future of the tourism industry and the social implications the economic downturn would have. Besides that, tourism actors in both destinations were trying to adapt and change their business models or products to respond to the crisis. They could see some positive signs in the new products or models they have adapted and how they could shape the future. Thinking out of the box or investing time and effort in things they did not have the time to do before were perceived as positive. Although at a very early stage to claim any transformation, change and adaptability to respond to the new circumstances and reduce losses were found among businesses. This is an early reaction paper to understand how companies and destinations were experiencing and understanding their situation amidst the crisis. This knowledge can help us understand and better manage destinations for the new normal but also in future crisis situations.

National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-37449 (URN)
Conference
Regions in Recovery: Building Sustainable Futures - Global E-Festival. June 02- 18, 2021
Available from: 2021-06-21 Created: 2021-06-21 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Farsari, I. (2021). HDa – Site Collaboration Review  2020-2021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HDa – Site Collaboration Review  2020-2021
2021 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44275 (URN)
Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2022-12-16Bibliographically approved
Projects
Kilmatförändringar och Hållbar turism i det Nya Normala: insikter från coronapandemin; Publications
Farsari, I. & Persson-Fischier, U. (2022). Climate change and sustainable tourism in the new normal: How can we learn from the Covid-19 pandemic?. Farsari, I. (2021). Climate change and sustainable tourism in the new normal. In: Tourism 21: Re-building Tourism – Continuities and Changes: . Paper presented at ATLAS Annual Conference 2021 “Tourism 21: Re-building Tourism – Continuities and Changes”, AMBIS University, Prague, Czech Republic, 7 - 10 September, 2021 (online). Farsari, I., Poort, M. & Persson-Fischier, U. (2021). Sustainable tourism in the new normal: learning from covid experience. In: : . Paper presented at 29th Nordic Symposium on Tourism and Hospitality Research, "Shaping mobile futures: Challenges and possibilities in precarious times", Icelandic Tourism Research Center, 21-23 September 2021 (online).
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4278-3117

Search in DiVA

Show all publications