Dalarna University's logo and link to the university's website

du.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Göransson, KatarinaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4062-4470
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 72) Show all publications
Amritzer, M., Göransson, K., Berg, L. & Nymark, C. (2023). A new perspective of missed nursing care – the emergency department context: a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Journal of Emergency Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new perspective of missed nursing care – the emergency department context: a descriptive, cross-sectional study
2023 (English)In: Journal of Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0099-1767, E-ISSN 1527-2966Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47631 (URN)
Available from: 2023-12-29 Created: 2023-12-29 Last updated: 2024-01-02Bibliographically approved
Nymark, C., Falk, A.-C., von Vogelsang, A.-C. & Göransson, K. (2023). Differences between Registered Nurses and nurse assistants around missed nursing care - An observational, comparative study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 37(4), 1028-1037
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences between Registered Nurses and nurse assistants around missed nursing care - An observational, comparative study
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 1028-1037Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: From a nursing perspective, tasks that are not carried out, and the consequences of this, have been studied for over a decade. The difference between Registered Nurses (RNs) and nurse assistants (NAs) regarding qualifications and work tasks, and the profound knowledge around RN-to-patient ratios, warrants investigating missed nursing care (MNC) for each group rather than as one (nursing staff).

AIM: To describe and compare RNs and NAs ratings of and reasons for MNC at in-hospital wards.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study with a comparative approach. RNs and NAs at in-hospital medical and surgical wards for adults were invited to answer the MISSCARE Survey-Swedish version, including questions on patient safety and quality of care.

RESULTS: A total of 205 RNs and 219 NAs answered the questionnaire. Quality of care and patient safety was rated as good by both RNs and NAs. Compared to NAs, RNs reported more MNC, for example, in the item 'Turning patient every 2 h' (p < 0.001), 'Ambulation three times per day or as ordered' (p = 0.018), and 'Mouth care' (p < 0.001). NAs reported more MNC in the items 'Medications administered within 30 min before or after scheduled time' (p = 0.005), and 'Patient medication requests acted on within 15 min' (p < 0.001). No significant differences were found between the samples concerning reasons for MNC.

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that RNs' and NAs' ratings of MNC to a large extent differed between the groups. RNs and NAs should be viewed as separate groups based on their different knowledge levels and roles when caring for patients. Thus, viewing all nursing staff as a homogenous group in MNC research may mask important differences between the groups. These differences are important to address when taking actions to reduce MNC in the clinical setting.

Keywords
missed nursing care, patient safety, quality of care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-45934 (URN)10.1111/scs.13175 (DOI)000980038000001 ()37114356 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85156264560 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2023-11-13Bibliographically approved
Crilly, J., Muntlin, Å., Green, D., Malyon, L., Christofis, L., Higgins, M., . . . Göransson, K. (2023). Factors predictive of hospital admission for children via emergency departments in Australia and Sweden: an observational cross-sectional study.. BMC Health Services Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors predictive of hospital admission for children via emergency departments in Australia and Sweden: an observational cross-sectional study.
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47629 (URN)
Available from: 2023-12-29 Created: 2023-12-29 Last updated: 2024-01-02Bibliographically approved
Singh, L., Kanstrup, M., Gamble, B., Geranmayeh, A., Göransson, K., Rudman, A., . . . Moulds, M. L. (2022). A first remotely-delivered guided brief intervention to reduce intrusive memories of psychological trauma for healthcare staff working during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 26, Article ID 100884.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A first remotely-delivered guided brief intervention to reduce intrusive memories of psychological trauma for healthcare staff working during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, E-ISSN 2451-8654, Vol. 26, article id 100884Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Addressing the mental health needs of healthcare staff exposed to psychologically traumatic events at work during the COVID-19 pandemic is a pressing global priority. We need to swiftly develop interventions to target the psychological consequences (e.g., persistent intrusive memories of trauma). Interventions for healthcare staff must be brief, flexible, fitted around the reality and demands of working life under the pandemic, and repeatable during ongoing/further trauma exposure. Intervention delivery during the pandemic should be remote to mitigate risk of infection; e.g., here using a blend of digitalized self-administered materials (e.g., video instructions) and guided (remote) support from a researcher. This parallel groups, two-arm, randomised controlled trial (RCT) with healthcare staff working during the COVID-19 pandemic is the first evaluation of whether a digitalized form of a brief cognitive task intervention, which is remotely-delivered (guided), reduces intrusive memories. Healthcare staff (target N = 130 completers) who experience intrusive memories of work-related traumatic event(s) during the COVID-19 pandemic (≥2 in the week before inclusion) will be randomly allocated (1:1) to receive either the cognitive task intervention or an active (attention placebo) control, and followed up at 1-week, 1-month, 3-months, and 6-months post-intervention. The primary outcome will be the number of intrusive memories reported during Week 5; secondary and other outcomes include the number of intrusive memories reported during Week 1, and other intrusive symptoms. Findings will inform further development and dissemination of a brief cognitive task intervention to target intrusive memories.

Keywords
COVID-19, Digital intervention, Healthcare staff, Intrusive memories, Psychological trauma, Randomised controlled trial
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-39373 (URN)10.1016/j.conctc.2022.100884 (DOI)000820423400003 ()35036626 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124614442 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-02 Created: 2022-02-02 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Wireklint, S. C., Elmqvist, C., Fridlund, B. & Göransson, K. (2022). A longitudinal, retrospective registry-based validation study of RETTS©, the Swedish adult ED context version. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 30(1), Article ID 27.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal, retrospective registry-based validation study of RETTS©, the Swedish adult ED context version
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 30, no 1, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Triage and triage related work has been performed in Swedish Emergency Departments (EDs) since the mid-1990s. The Rapid Emergency Triage and Treatment System (RETTS©), with annual updates, is the most applied triage system. However, the national implementation has been performed despite low scientific foundation for triage as a method, mainly related to the absence of adjustment to age and gender. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies of RETTS© in Swedish ED context, especially of RETTS© validity. Hence, the aim the study was to determine the validity of RETTS©.

METHODS: A longitudinal retrospective register study based on cohort data from a healthcare region comprising two EDs in southern Sweden. Two editions of RETTS© was selected; year 2013 and 2016, enabling comparison of crude data, and adjusted for age-combined Charlson comorbidity index (ACCI) and gender. All patients ≥ 18 years visiting either of the two EDs seeing a physician, was included. Primary outcome was ten-day mortality, secondary outcome was admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The data was analysed with descriptive, and inferential statistics.

RESULTS: Totally 74,845 patients were included. There was an increase in patients allocated red or orange triage levels (unstable) between the years, but a decrease of admission, both to general ward and ICU. Of all patients, 1031 (1.4%) died within ten-days. Both cohorts demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the triage levels, i.e. a higher risk for ten-day mortality and ICU admission for patients in all triage levels compared to those in green triage level. Furthermore, significant statistically differences were demonstrated for ICU admission, crude as well as adjusted, and for adjusted data ten-day mortality, indicating that ACCI explained ten-day mortality, but not ICU admission. However, no statistically significant difference was found for the two annual editions of RETTS© considering ten-day mortality, crude data.

CONCLUSION: The annual upgrade of RETTS© had no statistically significant impact on the validity of the triage system, considering the risk for ten-day mortality. However, the inclusion of ACCI, or at least age, can improve the validity of the triage system.

Keywords
Emergency Department—Emergency Service, Hospital, Rapid emergency triage and treatment system—RETTS©, Sweden, Triage—emergency medical services, Validity—reproducibility of results
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-41323 (URN)10.1186/s13049-022-01014-4 (DOI)000782758300001 ()35428351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128357589 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 646221
Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-29 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Piscator, E., Göransson, K., Forsberg, S., Herlitz, J. & Djärv, T. (2022). Do-Not-Attempt-Cardiopulmonary-Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions in patients admitted through the emergency department in a Swedish University Hospital: An observational study of outcome, patient characteristics and changes in DNACPR decisions. Resuscitation Plus, 9, Article ID 100209.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do-Not-Attempt-Cardiopulmonary-Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions in patients admitted through the emergency department in a Swedish University Hospital: An observational study of outcome, patient characteristics and changes in DNACPR decisions
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Resuscitation Plus, E-ISSN 2666-5204, Vol. 9, article id 100209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aims were to examine patient and hospital characteristics associated with Do-Not-Attempt-Cardiopulmonary-Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions for adult admissions through the emergency department (ED), for patients with DNACPR decisions to examine patient and hospital characteristics associated with hospital mortality, and to explore changes in CPR status.

Methods: This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients admitted through the ED at Karolinska University Hospital 1 January to 31 October 2015.

Results: The cohort included 25,646 ED admissions, frequency of DNACPR decisions was 11% during hospitalisation. Patients with DNACPR decisions were older, with an overall higher burden of chronic comorbidities, unstable triage scoring, hospital mortality and one-year mortality compared to those without. For patients with DNACPR decisions, 63% survived to discharge and one-year mortality was 77%. Age and comorbidities for patients with DNACPR decisions were similar regardless of hospital mortality, those who died showed signs of more severe acute illness on ED arrival. Change in CPR status during hospitalisation was 5% and upon subsequent admission 14%. For patients discharged with DNACPR decisions, reversal of DNACPR status upon subsequent admission was 32%, with uncertainty as to whether this reversal was active or a consequence of a lack of consideration.

Conclusion: For a mixed population of adults admitted through the ED, frequency of DNACPR decisions was 11%. Two-thirds of patients with DNACPR decisions were discharged, but one-year mortality was high. For patients discharged with DNACPR decisions, reversal of DNACPR status was substantial and this should merit further attention.

Keywords
DNACPR, DNAR, DNR, Do-Not-Attempt-Cardiopulmonary-Resuscitation, Resuscitation decisions
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-39651 (URN)10.1016/j.resplu.2022.100209 (DOI)000771470700014 ()35169759 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134723490 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-22 Created: 2022-02-22 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Falk, A.-C., Nymark, C., Göransson, K. & von Vogelsang, A.-C. (2022). Missed nursing care in the critical care unit, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: A comparative cross-sectional study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 72, Article ID 103276.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Missed nursing care in the critical care unit, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: A comparative cross-sectional study
2022 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 72, article id 103276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To describe and evaluate reported missed nursing care in the critical care context during different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: A comparative cross-sectional design was used, comparing missed nursing care in three samples: before the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019, during the second wave of the pandemic in spring 2020, and during the third wave of the pandemic in fall 2021.

SETTING: The study was conducted at critical care units at a university hospital, Sweden.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The MISSCARE Survey-Swedish version was used to collect data along with two study-specific questions concerning perception of patient safety and quality of care.

RESULTS: Significantly more overtime hours and number of days absent due to illness were reported during the pandemic. The nurse/patient ratio was above the recommended level at all data collection time points. Most missed nursing care was reported in items concerning basic care. The most reported reasons for missed nursing care in all samples concerned inadequate staffing, urgent situations, and a rise in patient volume. Most nurses in all samples perceived the level of patient safety and quality of care as good, and the majority had no intention to leave their current position.

CONCLUSION: The pandemic had a great impact on the critical care workforce but few elements of missed nursing care were affected. To measure and use missed nursing care as a quality indicator could be valuable for nursing managers, to inform them and improve their ability to meet changes in patient needs with different workforce approaches in critical care settings.

Keywords
Critical care, Cross-sectional studies, Missed nursing care, Nursing, Quality of care, Workforce
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-41670 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2022.103276 (DOI)000861045100004 ()35672210 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85131587445 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-20 Created: 2022-06-20 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Lundin, A., Akram, S. K., Berg, L. M., Göransson, K. E. & Enocson, A. (2022). Thoracic injuries in trauma patients: epidemiology and its influence on mortality. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 30(1), Article ID 69.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thoracic injuries in trauma patients: epidemiology and its influence on mortality
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 30, no 1, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Thoracic injuries are common among trauma patients. Studies on trauma patients with thoracic injuries have reported considerable differences in morbidity and mortality, and there is limited research on comparison between trauma patients with and without thoracic injuries, particularly in the Scandinavian population. Thoracic injuries in trauma patients should be identified early and need special attention since the differences in injury patterns among patient population are important as they entail different treatment regimens and influence patient outcomes. The aim of the study was to describe the epidemiology of trauma patients with and without thoracic injuries and its influence on 30-day mortality.

METHODS: Patients were identified through the Karolinska Trauma Register. The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) system was used to find patients with thoracic injuries. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate factors [age, gender, ASA class, GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale), NISS (New Injury Severity Score) and thoracic injury] associated with 30-day mortality.

RESULTS: A total of 2397 patients were included. Of those, 768 patients (32%) had a thoracic injury. The mean (± SD, range) age of all patients (n = 2397) was 46 (20, 18-98) years, and the majority (n = 1709, 71%) of the patients were males. There was a greater proportion of patients with rib fractures among older (≥ 60 years) patients, whereas younger patients had a higher proportion of injuries to the internal thoracic organs. The 30-day mortality was 11% (n = 87) in patients with thoracic injury and 4.3% (n = 71) in patients without. After multivariable adjustment, a thoracic injury was found to be associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-3.0); as was age ≥ 60 years (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.3-6.0), ASA class 3-4 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.6), GCS 1-8 (OR 21, 95% CI 13-33) and NISS > 15 (OR 4.2, 2.4-7.3).

CONCLUSION: Thoracic injury was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality after adjustment for relevant key variables. We also found a difference in injury patterns with older patients having a higher proportion of rib fractures, whilst younger patients suffered more internal thoracic organ injuries.

Keywords
Chest injury, Mortality, Poly trauma, Thoracic trauma, Trauma
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44344 (URN)10.1186/s13049-022-01058-6 (DOI)000897915600001 ()36503613 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143657050 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-16 Created: 2022-12-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Kanstrup, M., Singh, L., Göransson, K., Gamble, B., Taylor, R. S., Iyadurai, L., . . . Holmes, E. A. (2021). A simple cognitive task intervention to prevent intrusive memories after trauma in patients in the Emergency Department: A randomized controlled trial terminated due to COVID-19. BMC Research Notes, 14(1), 176-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simple cognitive task intervention to prevent intrusive memories after trauma in patients in the Emergency Department: A randomized controlled trial terminated due to COVID-19
Show others...
2021 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 176-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Objective This randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed to investigate the effects of a simple cognitive task intervention on intrusive memories ("flashbacks") and associated symptoms following a traumatic event. Patients presenting to a Swedish emergency department (ED) soon after a traumatic event were randomly allocated (1:1) to the simple cognitive task intervention (memory cue + mental rotation instructions + computer game "Tetris" for at least 20 min) or control (podcast, similar time). We planned follow-ups at one-week, 1-month, and where possible, 3- and 6-months post-trauma. Anticipated enrolment was N = 148. Results The RCT was terminated prematurely after recruiting N = 16 participants. The COVID-19 pandemic prevented recruitment/testing in the ED because: (i) the study required face-to-face contact between participants, psychology researchers, ED staff, and patients, incurring risk of virus transmission; (ii) the host ED site received COVID-19 patients; and (iii) reduced flow of patients otherwise presenting to the ED in non-pandemic conditions (e.g. after trauma). We report on delivery of study procedures, recruitment, treatment adherence, outcome completion (primary outcome: number of intrusive memories during week 5), attrition, and limitations. The information presented and limitations may enable our group and others to learn from this terminated study. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04185155 (04-12-2019)

Keywords
Index Medicus
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-37005 (URN)10.1186/s13104-021-05572-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-05-24 Created: 2021-05-24 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Wireklint, S. C., Elmqvist, C. & Göransson, K. (2021). An updated national survey of triage and triage related work in Sweden: a cross-sectional descriptive and comparative study.. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 29(1), 89, Article ID 89.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An updated national survey of triage and triage related work in Sweden: a cross-sectional descriptive and comparative study.
2021 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 89-, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Triage and triage related work has been performed in Swedish Emergency Departments (EDs) since the mid-1990s. According to two national surveys from 2005 to 2011, triage was carried out with different triage scales and without guidelines or formal education. Furthermore, a review from 2010 questioned the scientific evidence for both triage as a method as well as the Swedish five level triage scale Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System (METTS); nevertheless, METTS was applied in 65% of the EDs in 2011. Subsequently, METTS was renamed to Rapid Emergency Triage and Treatment System (RETTS©). The hypothesis for this study is that the method of triage is still applied nationally and that the use of METTS/RETTS© has increased. Hence, the aim is to describe the occurrence and application of triage and triage related work at Swedish Emergency Departments, in comparison with previous national surveys.

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study with a descriptive and comparative design, an electronic questionnaire was developed, based on questionnaire from previous studies. The survey was distributed to all hospital affiliated EDs from late March to the middle of July in 2019. The data was analysed with descriptive statistics, by IBM SPSS Statistics, version 26.

RESULTS: Of the 51 (75%) EDs partaking in the study, all (100%) applied triage, and 92% used the Swedish triage scale RETTS©. Even so, there was low concordance in how RETTS© was applied regarding time frames i.e., how long a patient in respective triage level could wait for assessment by a physician. Additionally, the results show a major diversion in how the EDs performed education in triage.

CONCLUSION: This study confirms that triage method is nationally implemented across Swedish EDs. RETTS© is the dominating triage scale but cannot be considered as one triage scale due to the variation with regard to time frames per triage level. Further, a diversion in introduction and education in the pivotal role of triage has been shown. This can be counteracted by national guidelines in what triage scale to use and how to perform triage education.

Keywords
Education – competency-based education, Emergency service, hospital – emergency department, Health care quality, access, and evaluation – cross-sectional study, Rapid emergency triage and treatment system, Sweden, Triage – emergency medical service
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-44650 (URN)10.1186/s13049-021-00905-2 (DOI)34217351 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-12-20 Created: 2022-12-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Utveckling av en ny kvarliggande urinkateter- T-Control®: en genomförbarhetsstudie inför en randomiserad kontrollerad studieMIssed NUrSing care-Karolinska University Hospital (MINUS-K); Publications
Falk, A.-C., Nymark, C., Göransson, K. & von Vogelsang, A.-C. (2022). Missed nursing care in the critical care unit, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: A comparative cross-sectional study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 72, Article ID 103276. Nymark, C., Göransson, K., Saboonchi, F., Falk, A. & Vogelsang, A. (2020). Translation, culture adaption and psychometric testing of the MISSCARE Survey—Swedish version. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 29(23-24), 4645-4652
Akutmottagningstriage i Sverige: validitet, reliabilitet och förekomst av RETTS samt triagesjuksköterskors erfarenheter; Publications
Wireklint, S. C., Elmqvist, C., Fridlund, B. & Göransson, K. (2022). A longitudinal, retrospective registry-based validation study of RETTS©, the Swedish adult ED context version. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 30(1), Article ID 27. Wireklint, S. C., Elmqvist, C. & Göransson, K. (2021). An updated national survey of triage and triage related work in Sweden: a cross-sectional descriptive and comparative study.. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 29(1), 89, Article ID 89. Wireklint, S. C., Elmqvist, C., Parenti, N. & Göransson, K. (2018). A descriptive study of registered nurses' application of the triage scale RETTS©; a Swedish reliability study.. International Emergency Nursing, 38, 21-28, Article ID S1755-599X(17)30171-4.
Återhämtning efter trauma: tänkbara associationer mellan PREM och PROMEnkel Kognitiv Uppgift efter Trauma under COVID-19 - sjukvårdspersonal 'EKUT-P' – en randomiserad kontrollerad studie; Publications
Singh, L., Kanstrup, M., Gamble, B., Geranmayeh, A., Göransson, K., Rudman, A., . . . Moulds, M. L. (2022). A first remotely-delivered guided brief intervention to reduce intrusive memories of psychological trauma for healthcare staff working during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 26, Article ID 100884. Kanstrup, M., Singh, L., Göransson, K., Gamble, B., Taylor, R. S., Iyadurai, L., . . . Holmes, E. A. (2021). A simple cognitive task intervention to prevent intrusive memories after trauma in patients in the Emergency Department: A randomized controlled trial terminated due to COVID-19. BMC Research Notes, 14(1), 176-176Singh, L., Kanstrup, M., Depa, K., Falk, A.-C., Lindström, V., Dahl, O., . . . Holmes, E. A. (2021). Digitalizing a Brief Intervention to Reduce Intrusive Memories of Psychological Trauma for Healthcare Staff Working During COVID-19: An Exploratory Pilot Study with Nurses.. JMIR Formative Research, 5(5), Article ID e27473. Kanstrup, M., Rudman, A., Göransson, K., Andersson, E., Lauri, K. O., Rapoport, E., . . . Holmes, E. A. (2021). Reaching people soon after a traumatic event: an exploratory observational feasibility study of recruitment in the emergency department to deliver a brief behavioral intervention via smartphone to prevent intrusive memories of trauma.. Pilot and feasibility studies, 7(1), Article ID 184. Kanstrup, M., Singh, L., Göransson, K., Widoff, J., Taylor, R. S., Gamble, B., . . . Holmes, E. A. (2021). Reducing intrusive memories after trauma via a brief cognitive task intervention in the hospital emergency department: an exploratory pilot randomised controlled trial. Translational Psychiatry, 11(1), 30-30
Kartläggning av förutsättningarna för patienter med traumatiska bröstkorgsskador – fokus på epidemiologi och patientsäkerhet; Publications
Lundin, A., Akram, S. K., Berg, L. M., Göransson, K. E. & Enocson, A. (2022). Thoracic injuries in trauma patients: epidemiology and its influence on mortality. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 30(1), Article ID 69.
Brytpunkter för säker vård – samband mellan patientutfall och bemanning inom omvårdnadValidering av registerdata för utvärdering av oönskade händelser efter höftproteskirurgi; Publications
Hommel, A., Magnéli, M., Samuelsson, B., Schildmeijer, K., Sjöstrand, D., Göransson, K. & Unbeck, M. (2020). Exploring the incidence and nature of nursing-sensitive orthopaedic adverse events: A multicenter cohort study using Global Trigger Tool.. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 102, Article ID 103473. Magnéli, M., Unbeck, M., Rogmark, C., Sköldenberg, O. & Gordon, M. (2020). Measuring adverse events following hip arthroplasty surgery using administrative data without relying on ICD-codes.. PLOS ONE, 15(11), Article ID e0242008. Magnéli, M., Unbeck, M., Samuelsson, B., Rogmark, C., Rolfson, O., Gordon, M. & Sköldenberg, O. (2020). Only 8% of major preventable adverse events after hip arthroplasty are filed as claims: a Swedish multi-center cohort study on 1,998 patients.. Acta Orthopaedica, 91(1), 20-25Magnéli, M., Unbeck, M., Rogmark, C., Rolfson, O., Hommel, A., Samuelsson, B., . . . Sköldenberg, O. (2019). Validation of adverse events after hip arthroplasty: a Swedish multi-centre cohort study.. BMJ Open, 9(3), Article ID e023773.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4062-4470

Search in DiVA

Show all publications