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Inose, Hiroko
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Aronsson, M., Fjordevik, A. & Inose, H. (2018). Fan Activities in Online University Education (1ed.). In: Katherine Anderson Howell (Ed.), Fandom as Classroom Practice: A Teaching Guide (pp. 70-82). Iowa City: University of Iowa Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fan Activities in Online University Education
2018 (English)In: Fandom as Classroom Practice: A Teaching Guide / [ed] Katherine Anderson Howell, Iowa City: University of Iowa Press , 2018, 1, p. 70-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
Fandom & Culture
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Intercultural Studies, Fanfiction och litteraturundervisning i franska
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-27974 (URN)978-1-60938-567-5 (ISBN)978-1-60938-568-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Inose, H. (2018). Language Spoken by Murakami’s Female Personages and Japanese Pseudo-Translation Style. In: : . Paper presented at 40 Years with Haruki Murakami, Newcastle University, UK, 8-9 March 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language Spoken by Murakami’s Female Personages and Japanese Pseudo-Translation Style
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Language Spoken by Murakami’s Female Personages and Japanese Pseudo-Translation Style

Hiroko Inose (Dalarna University, Sweden)

Murakami’s original Japanese text is often described as if it was “translated” from English. The reason for this can vary, and some mention his use of metaphors imported from English, while others suggest that his sentence structure is close to that of English language. The present study suggests yet another element which might be contributing to such claim – the Japanese female language spoken by Murakami’s female personages.

Japanese female speech patterns (onna-kotoba) can be found most frequently in texts translated into Japanese from other languages, where it appears much more often than in actual language spoken by today’s Japanese women. This includes not only fictions, but also translation of interviews or film/TV subtitles and dubbings. It is very possible that this excessive use of now classical female language in translated texts has contributed to the creation of a prototypical image of “translated Japanese” style.

The present study analyses several female personages in Murakami’s works from different periods (e.g. Sputunik Sweetheart, Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage among others) to compare their articulation style to the female speech patterns frequently found in translated Japanese texts.  It also considers in the Murakami’s original Japanese text, what nuance this female speech pattern is adding to the female personages– in other words, what has to be inevitably lost or changed in translation into other languages which do not differentiate male/female/neutral speech patterns as markedly as in Japanese.     

Keywords
Female language, Japanese, Translation, Translationese, Haruki Murakami
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28425 (URN)
Conference
40 Years with Haruki Murakami, Newcastle University, UK, 8-9 March 2018
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Saito, R., Hayakawa Thor, M. & Inose, H. (2017). Developing Intercultural Competence and Language Skills Through International Online Collaborative Learning. In: Catherine Hua Xiang (Ed.), Cases on Audio-Visual Media in Language Education: (pp. 304-327). IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing Intercultural Competence and Language Skills Through International Online Collaborative Learning
2017 (English)In: Cases on Audio-Visual Media in Language Education / [ed] Catherine Hua Xiang, IGI Global, 2017, p. 304-327Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IGI Global, 2017
Keywords
Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, Ethnocentrism, Ethnorelativism, Intercultural competence, Personalization
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25216 (URN)9781522527244 (ISBN)9781522527251 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-06-18 Created: 2017-06-18 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Inose, H. (2017). Literature Translation as Re-importation: When the Text Travels Twice Between Cultures. In: : . Paper presented at The 8th Asian Translation Tradition Conference at SOAS: Conflicting Ideologies and Cultural Mediation – Hearing, Interpreting, Translating Global Voices, 5-7 July 2017, Russell Square, College Buildings, London.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Literature Translation as Re-importation: When the Text Travels Twice Between Cultures
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Literature Translation as Re-importation: When the Text Travels Twice Between Cultures

Name: Hiroko Inose

Contact address: hin@du.se

Affiliation: Dalarna University (Sweden)

In the field of literature translation, the treatment of cultural references becomes one of the major issues. In order to transfer the source culture (i.e. the culture of the source text, ST) into the target culture (i.e. the culture of the target text, TT), there are numbers of translation strategies. However, the problem becomes even more complicated if the text has to travel not only once, but twice between the source and target cultures.

This can happen in various ways, but one case is when a ST, written about the target culture, is translated into the target language (TL), to be read by the readers of the target culture.  For example, translating a novel on Japanese traditional culture published in U.S. and written in English into Japanese language would give a series of special translation problems that would not occur when the same novel is translated into any other language. This is not only because of the distance between English and Japanese languages and differences in their structures, but because of the significant difference of cultural knowledge between ST (in this case, English original version) and TT (in this case Japanese translation) readers – unlike in the usual case of translation, the TT readers are expected to have much more knowledge than ST readers about the cultural themes treated in the novel. This may be called re-importation of culture. The target culture is first imported into the ST for the ST readers, and then re-imported into the TT through translation.

The present study will focus on language combinations English/Japanese and French/Japanese, and study novels written on traditional or current Japanese culture and society that have been translated into Japanese.  Original and translation of novels such as Memoir of a Geisha (Arthur Golden,1999), An Artist of the Floating World (Kazuo Ishiguro, 1986) or Stupeur et Tremblements (Amélie Nothomb,1999) will be analysed to see the translation problems encountered, as well as translation strategies used to solve them.

Keywords
Re-import of translatoin, cultural translation, Otherness, Foreignization
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25868 (URN)
Conference
The 8th Asian Translation Tradition Conference at SOAS: Conflicting Ideologies and Cultural Mediation – Hearing, Interpreting, Translating Global Voices, 5-7 July 2017, Russell Square, College Buildings, London
Funder
Åke Wiberg Foundation, H14-0162
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2017-08-28Bibliographically approved
Inose, H. (2016). Butsuriteki na kyori wo koete - online kouryuukai no igi (Surpassing the Physical Distance - The Purpose of Japanese Online Conversation Project). In: : . Paper presented at JFBP(Japan Foundation) Online Workshop for Japanese Teachers.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Butsuriteki na kyori wo koete - online kouryuukai no igi (Surpassing the Physical Distance - The Purpose of Japanese Online Conversation Project)
2016 (Japanese)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [ja]

物理的な距離を越えて-オンライン交流会の意義

ダーラナ大学(スウェーデン) 猪瀬博子

 

発表要旨

ダーラナ大学(スウェーデン)では、2015年3月よりグラナダ大学(スペイン)と共同で、オンラインで互いの大学の初級日本語学習者の交流会を行っている。二週間に一度の二時間程度のセッションのために、学習者は予め決められたテーマ(①自己紹介、②私の家族、③クリスマスまたはイースター、④日本に行ってしてみたいこと)についての発表をそれぞれ準備し、オンライン上の小グループで各々発表を行い、ディスカッションを行う。

本発表では、クラスでは文法習得で精いっぱいになりがちな初級日本語学習者が、オンライン上のディスカッショングループで互いに「つながりたい、つながりやすい」環境を作り出すことで、どのように「コミュニケーションのための日本語」を体感し、これを学ぶことができるかを、参加学生による振り返り、および交流会後のアンケートにより分析していく。

Keywords
日本語教育、オンライン教育、コミュニケーションのための日本語
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-25215 (URN)
Conference
JFBP(Japan Foundation) Online Workshop for Japanese Teachers
Available from: 2017-06-18 Created: 2017-06-18 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
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