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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Pourfakhimi, S., Duncan, T. & Coetzee, W. (2019). A critique of the progress of eTourism technology acceptance research: time for a hike?. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A critique of the progress of eTourism technology acceptance research: time for a hike?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, ISSN 1757-9880, E-ISSN 1757-9899Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-30591 (URN)10.1108/JHTT-08-2018-0077 (DOI)2-s2.0-85068877544 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Duncan, T. (2019). Om mobilitet och turismens geografier. Ymer, 139, 119-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Om mobilitet och turismens geografier
2019 (English)In: Ymer, ISSN 0044-0477, Vol. 139, p. 119-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-30104 (URN)2-s2.0-85065469090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Hopkins, D., Higham, J., Orchiston, C. & Duncan, T. (2019). Practising academic mobilities: Bodies, networks and institutional rhythms. Geographical Journal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practising academic mobilities: Bodies, networks and institutional rhythms
2019 (English)In: Geographical Journal, ISSN 0016-7398, E-ISSN 1475-4959Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Notions of what a successful academic should be doing – researching, publishing, teaching, serving the academic community – are often dependent upon particular practices of corporeal mobilities. These practices discursively and materially connect historically situated academic mobilities with the “modern,” globalised university system. At the same time, there is increasing attention being paid to the “hypocrisy of hypermobile academics” – often reliant on high-carbon aeromobilities – in light of the unprecedented and urgent need to decarbonise transport to limit warming to 1.5°C. Using qualitative material gathered from one academic institution in Aotearoa New Zealand, we pay attention to the politics of academic mobilities at multiple scales, from the academic body, to social/family networks, and institutional rhythms. We contribute to the growing body of work that reflects on academic practice, and argue that detailed understandings of these processes are required to overcome the so-called “climate hypocrisy” of high-carbon academic work-related travel.

National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-30370 (URN)10.1111/geoj.12301 (DOI)2-s2.0-85066907910 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
diva2:1169962
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The issue of translation during thematic analysis in a tourism research context
2019 (English)In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 415-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research note discusses issues with translation of non-English text during qualitative analysis in tourism research using examples from the newly emergent phenomenon of Chinese working holidaymakers in New Zealand. In particular, this note highlights an additional translation step in the thematic analysis process with non-English interview quotes and excerpts. This note argues the merit of researchers’ dual role as researcher/translator and discusses how researchers can undertake translation in cross-language research to maintain the rigour of qualitative tourism research. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Keywords
non-English text, thematic analysis, translation, working holidaymakers
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26899 (URN)10.1080/13683500.2017.1411892 (DOI)000454948100004 ()2-s2.0-85038027085 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-01 Created: 2018-01-01 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved
Heldt Cassel, S., Thulemark, M. & Duncan, T. (2017). Career paths and mobility in the Swedish hospitality sector.. Tourism Geographies, 20(1), 29-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Career paths and mobility in the Swedish hospitality sector.
2017 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How career paths are interpreted and conceptualised by hospitality workers and industry representatives remains underexplored in current literature. In this paper, we highlight and discuss sector-specific and contextual factors that influence the possibility of establishing a career within the Swedish hospitality sector. The paper uses interviews with hotel managers, who describe and discuss motivations and choices made throughout their own careers and interviews with young (former) seasonal hospitality workers who describe and reflect on their future plans and work-life experience. Additional data are derived through observations at national seminars and meetings for representatives from the Swedish tourism and hospitality industry, where issues of competence and careers were discussed. The findings indicate that the shaping of career paths within the hospitality sector is influenced by two normative and discursively produced ‘truths’ about career paths in the hospitality sector: the importance of internal knowledge transfer and the importance of high mobility. These narratives impose expectations on individuals to be mobile, to change jobs frequently and to work their way from the bottom-up within the industry, and are based on a presumption of a diversified and dense local hospitality labour market. However, since the conditions are different due to contextual, geographical features of labour market size and structure, attractiveness of places, etc., these expectations are difficult to fulfil in places other than in larger urban areas. These normative assumptions of what a successful hospitality career is also have consequences for the development of the hospitality sector as external influences of competence from other sectors and higher education are not seen as valuable, which makes the sector self-contained and not open to external, potentially innovative knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, Karriärvägar i svensk besöksnäring; Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, General Microdata Analysis - tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26758 (URN)10.1080/14616688.2017.1402946 (DOI)000427764600003 ()2-s2.0-85036524662 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Karriärvägar i svensk besöksnäring
Funder
The R&D Fund of the Swedish Tourism & Hospitality Industry (BFUF)
Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Scott, D. & Duncan, T. (2015). Back to the future: The affective power of food in reconstructing a tourist imaginary. In: Yeoman, I.a, McMahon-Beattie, U. Fields, K., Albrecht, J.N., Meethan, K. (Ed.), The Future of Food Tourism: Foodies, Experiences, Exclusivity, Visions and Political Capital: . Channel View Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Back to the future: The affective power of food in reconstructing a tourist imaginary
2015 (English)In: The Future of Food Tourism: Foodies, Experiences, Exclusivity, Visions and Political Capital / [ed] Yeoman, I.a, McMahon-Beattie, U. Fields, K., Albrecht, J.N., Meethan, K., Channel View Publications, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Channel View Publications, 2015
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-30143 (URN)
Available from: 2019-06-07 Created: 2019-06-07 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Duncan, T., Scott, D. & Baum, T. (2013). The mobilities of hospitality work: An exploration of issues and debates. Annals of Tourism Research, 41, 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The mobilities of hospitality work: An exploration of issues and debates
2013 (English)In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 41, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we highlight the contribution which an understanding of mobilities brings to an analysis of hospitality work. The complex mobilities of hospitality employees are playing an increasing role within global tourism and hospitality sectors. Our discussion explores notions of voluntary mobility as motivated by work and lifestyle factors. We challenge the commonplace conceptualisation of tourism and hospitality employment which has been predicated upon the nature of the work itself rather than on the diverse experience backgrounds; social and geographical origins; and motivating attributes of those who work in the sector. In taking this approach, we question conventional management discourses of hospitality labour processes and illustrate the value of adopting a mobilities framework within tourism and hospitality studies.

Keywords
Mobility hospitality work
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-30142 (URN)10.1016/j.annals.2012.10.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-06-07 Created: 2019-06-07 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1845-7001

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