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Bogren, Malin
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Erlandsson, K., Doraiswamy, S., Wallin, L. & Bogren, M. (2018). Capacity building of midwifery faculty to implement a 3-years midwifery diploma curriculum in Bangladesh: a process evaluation of a mentorship programme. Nurse Education in Practice, 29, 212-218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capacity building of midwifery faculty to implement a 3-years midwifery diploma curriculum in Bangladesh: a process evaluation of a mentorship programme
2018 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 29, p. 212-218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When a midwifery diploma-level programme was introduced in 2010 in Bangladesh, only a few nursing faculty staff members had received midwifery diploma-level. The consequences were an inconsistency in interpretation and implementation of the midwifery curriculum in the midwifery programme. To ensure that midwifery faculty staff members were adequately prepared to deliver the national midwifery curriculum, a mentorship programme was developed. The aim of this study was to examine feasibility and adherence to a mentorship programme among 19 midwifery faculty staff members who were lecturing the three years midwifery diploma-level programme at ten institutes/colleges in Bangladesh. The mentorship programme was evaluated using a process evaluation framework: (implementation, context, mechanisms of impact and outcomes). An online and face-to-face blended mentorship programme delivered by Swedish midwifery faculty staff members was found to be feasible, and it motivated the faculty staff members in Bangladesh both to deliver the national midwifery diploma curriculum as well as to carry out supportive supervision for midwifery students in clinical placement. First, the Swedish midwifery faculty staff members visited Bangladesh and provided a two-days on-site visit prior to the initiation of the online part of the mentorship programme. The second on-site visit was five-days long and took place at the end of the programme, that being six to eight months from the first visit. Building on the faculty staff members' response to feasibility and adherence to the mentorship programme, the findings indicate opportunities for future scale-up to all institutes/collages providing midwifery education in Bangladesh. It has been proposed that a blended online and face-to-face mentorship programme may be a means to improving national midwifery programmes in countries where midwifery has only recently been introduced.

Keywords
Capacity building, Mentorship, Midwifery faculty staff members, Process evaluation
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-27269 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2018.02.006 (DOI)000429755000033 ()29448231 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Bogren, M. & Erlandsson, K. (2018). Opportunities, challenges and strategies when building a midwifery profession. Findings from a qualitative study in Bangladesh and Nepal. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 16, 45-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities, challenges and strategies when building a midwifery profession. Findings from a qualitative study in Bangladesh and Nepal
2018 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 45-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

The aim of this paper was to identify opportunities and challenges when building a midwifery profession in Bangladesh and Nepal.

Methods

Data were collected through 33 semi-structured interviews with government officials, policy-makers, donors, and individuals from academia and non-government organizations with an influence in building a midwifery profession in their respective countries. Data were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

The opportunities and challenges found in Bangladesh and Nepal when building a midwifery profession emerged the theme “A comprehensive collaborative approach, with a political desire, can build a midwifery profession while competing views, interest, priorities and unawareness hamper the process”. Several factors were found to facilitate the establishment of a midwifery profession in both countries. For example, global and national standards brought together midwifery professionals and stakeholders, and helped in the establishment of midwifery associations. The challenges for both countries were national commitments without a full set of supporting policy documents, lack of professional recognition, and competing views, interests and priorities.

Conclusion and clinical application

This study demonstrated that building a midwifery profession requires a political comprehensive collaborative approach supported by a political commitment. Through bringing professionals together in a professional association will bring a professional status. Global standards and guidelines need to be contextualized into national policies and plans where midwives are included as part of the national health workforce. This is a key for creating recognized midwives with a protected title to autonomously practice midwifery, to upholding the sexual and reproductive health and rights for women and girls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Midwifery professionMidwifery strategyHealth workforceSouth AsiaBangladeshNepal
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-27312 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2018.02.003 (DOI)29804774 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041839398 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Bogren, M., Erlandsson, K. & Byrskog, U. (2018). What prevents midwifery quality care in Bangladesh? A focus group enquiry with midwifery students. BMC Health Services Research, 18(1), Article ID 639.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What prevents midwifery quality care in Bangladesh? A focus group enquiry with midwifery students
2018 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: With professional midwives being introduced in Bangladesh in 2013, the aim of this study was to describe midwifery students perceptions on midwives' realities in Bangladesh, based on their own experiences.

METHOD: Data were collected through 14 focus group discussions that included a total of 67 third-year diploma midwifery students at public nursing institutes/colleges in different parts of Bangladesh. Data were analyzed deductively using an analytical framework identifying social, professional and economical barriers to the provision of quality care by midwifery personnel.

RESULTS: The social barriers preventing midwifery quality care falls outside the parameters of Bangladeshi cultural norms that have been shaped by beliefs associated with religion, society, and gender norms. This puts midwives in a vulnerable position due to cultural prejudice. Professional barriers include heavy workloads with a shortage of staff who were not utilized to their full capacity within the health system. The reason for this was a lack of recognition in the medical hierarchy, leaving midwives with low levels of autonomy. Economical barriers were reflected by lack of supplies and hospital beds, midwives earning only low and/or irregular salaries, a lack of opportunities for recreation, and personal insecurity related to lack of housing and transportation.

CONCLUSION: Without adequate support for midwives, to strengthen their self-confidence through education and through continuous professional and economic development, little can be achieved in terms of improving quality care of women during the period around early and late pregnancy including childbirth.The findings can be used for discussions aimed to mobilize a midwifery workforce across the continuum of care to deliver quality reproductive health care services. No matter how much adequate support is provided to midwives, to strengthen their self-confidence through education, continuous professional and economic development, addressing the social barriers is a prerequisite for provision of quality care.

National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28364 (URN)10.1186/s12913-018-3447-5 (DOI)000441829700002 ()30111324 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051661540 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-21 Created: 2018-08-21 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
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