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Predator confusion is sufficient to evolve swarming behaviour
Michigan State University, East Lansing, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4872-1961
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2013 (English)In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ISSN 1742-5689, E-ISSN 1742-5662, Vol. 10, no 85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Swarming behaviours in animals have been extensively studied owing to their implications for the evolution of cooperation, social cognition and predator-prey dynamics. An important goal of these studies is discerning which evolutionary pressures favour the formation of swarms. One hypothesis is that swarms arise because the presence of multiple moving prey in swarms causes confusion for attacking predators, but it remains unclear how important this selective force is. Using an evolutionary model of a predator-prey system, we show that predator confusion provides a sufficient selection pressure to evolve swarming behaviour in prey. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the evolutionary effect of predator confusion on prey could in turn exert pressure on the structure of the predator's visual field, favouring the frontally oriented, high-resolution visual systems commonly observed in predators that feed on swarming animals. Finally, we provide evidence that when prey evolve swarming in response to predator confusion, there is a change in the shape of the functional response curve describing the predator's consumption rate as prey density increases. Thus, we show that a relatively simple perceptual constraint-predator confusion-could have pervasive evolutionary effects on prey behaviour, predator sensory mechanisms and the ecological interactions between predators and prey. © 2013 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society , 2013. Vol. 10, no 85
Keywords [en]
Functional response, Predator confusion effect, Predator visual system, Predator-prey coevolution, Swarming behaviour, Animals, Co-evolution, Swarming behaviours, Visual systems, Predator prey systems, animal behavior, article, confusion, cooperation, molecular evolution, nonhuman, predator, prey, retina, simulation, visual system, animal, biological model, evolution, food chain, predation, Behavior, Animal, Biological Evolution, Models, Biological, Predatory Behavior
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-37188DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2013.0305Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84891464952OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-37188DiVA, id: diva2:1557843
Available from: 2021-05-27 Created: 2021-05-27 Last updated: 2021-05-27Bibliographically approved

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Hintze, Arend

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf