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Exploring the coevolution of predator and prey morphology and behavior
Michigan State University, East Lansing, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4872-1961
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Artificial Life Conference 2016, ALIFE 2016, MIT Press Journals , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A common idiom in biology education states, “Eyes in the front, the animal hunts. Eyes on the side, the animal hides.” In this paper, we explore one possible explanation for why predators tend to have forward-facing, high-acuity visual systems. We do so using an agent-based computational model of evolution, where predators and prey interact and adapt their behavior and morphology to one another over successive generations of evolution. In this model, we observe a coevolutionary cycle between prey swarming behavior and the predator’s visual system, where the predator and prey continually adapt their visual system and behavior, respectively, over evolutionary time in reaction to one another due to the well-known “predator confusion effect.” Furthermore, we provide evidence that the predator visual system is what drives this coevolutionary cycle, and suggest that the cycle could be closed if the predator evolves a hybrid visual system capable of narrow, high-acuity vision for tracking prey as well as broad, coarse vision for prey discovery. Thus, the conflicting demands imposed on a predator’s visual system by the predator confusion effect could have led to the evolution of complex eyes in many predators. © 2016 MIT Press. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press Journals , 2016.
Keywords [en]
Predator confusion effect, Predator-prey coevolution, Swarming behavior, Visual acuity, Animals, Autonomous agents, Morphology, Agent based, Animal hides, Biology educations, Co-evolution, Co-evolutionary, Computational model, Visual systems, Predator prey systems
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-37180Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85087108987ISBN: 9780262339360 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-37180DiVA, id: diva2:1557882
Conference
15th International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, ALIFE 2016, 4 July 2016 - 8 July 2016
Available from: 2021-05-27 Created: 2021-05-27 Last updated: 2021-05-27Bibliographically approved

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Hintze, Arend

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf