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Studies of recently dead insects to understand insect remains in archaeological deposits
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Physical Geography.
2004 (English)In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 211-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today it becomes more and more common during archaeological investigations to use insect analyses when interpreting the natural and cultural environment during prehistoric and historic times. The composition and amount of insects in the deposits is dependent on both what insect species that is deposited and the preservation of the remains. It is therefore important to understand how different insects are preserved in archaeological deposits. Results are presented from analyses of recently dead insect remains in two wells and a stable floor, in south central Sweden. These data where compared with the results from Iron Age deposits. These data yield clues regarding the deposition of insect remains in prehistoric rural sites. It is concluded that ground-dwelling insects dominate records from wells and beetles enter the well accidentally and drown. Because of the absence of beetles associated with substrates like dung and wood in the modern deposits, in opposite to prehistoric, it is concluded that these groups of beetle species probably either are present around an uncovered well or are secondarily deposited through dumped material if the well head is covered and enclosed. The indoor environment of a stable is characterized through more remnants of insect species from the local human environment and wood, but also incorporates species randomly trapped during local flight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Entomologiska föreningen , 2004. Vol. 125, no 4, p. 211-222
Keywords [en]
subfossil insects, well, modern farm, Iron Age, taphonomy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-795OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:795DiVA, id: diva2:519449
Available from: 2004-12-27 Created: 2004-12-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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