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Residential planning, driver mobility and CO2 emission: a microscopic look at Borlänge in Sweden
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7512-5321
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2317-9157
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography. Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4871-833X
2017 (English)In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, 1-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In a city there are hotspots that attract citizens, and most of the transportation arises when citizens move between their residence and primary destinations (i.e. hotspots). However, an ex ante evaluation of energy-efficient mobility and urban residential planning has seldom been conducted. Therefore, this paper proposes an ex ante evaluation method to quantify the impacts, in terms of CO2 emissions induced by intra-urban car mobility, of residential plans for various urban areas. The method is illustrated in a case study of a Swedish midsize city, which is presently preoccupied with urban planning of new residential areas in response to substantial population growth due to immigration. In general, CO2 emissions increase from the continued urban core area (CUCA), to the sub-polycentric area (SPA), to the edge urbanization area (EUA), where CO2 emission of EUA is twice that of the CUCA. The average travel distances also increase in the same pattern, though the relative increase is more than four times. Apartment buildings could be more effective in meeting residential needs and mitigating CO2 emissions than dispersed single-family houses. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. 1-18 p.
Keyword [en]
Ex ante evaluation, GPS-tracking data, spatial distribution, urban form
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-24824DOI: 10.1080/09654313.2017.1317722ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85017904082OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-24824DiVA: diva2:1093567
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2017-06-05Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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