du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
On-scene and final assessments and their interrelationship among patients who use the EMS on multiple occasions
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The use of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is increasing. A number of patients call repeatedly for EMS. Early studies of frequent callers show that they form a heterogenous group. Problem: There is a lack of research on frequent EMS callers. There is furthermore a lack of knowledge about characteristics and the prehospital assessment of the patients who call for EMS on several occasions. Finally, there is a general lack of knowledge with regard to the association between the prehospital assessment by health care providers and the final diagnosis. Method: Patients in Skaraborg in Western Sweden, who used the EMS at least four times in 2014, were included, excluding transport between hospitals. Information on the prehospital assessment on-scene and the final diagnosis was collected from the EMS and hospital case records. Results: In all, 339 individual patients who used the EMS on 1,855 occasions were included, accounting for five percent of all missions. Fifty percent were women. The age range was 10-98 years, but more than 50.0% were in the age range of 70-89 years. The most common emergency signs and symptoms (ESS) codes on the scene were dyspnea, chest pain, and abdominal pain. The most common final diagnosis was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eight percent). Thirteen percent of all cases had a final diagnosis defined as a potentially life-threatening condition. Among these, 22.0% of prehospital assessments were retrospectively judged as potentially inappropriate. Forty-nine percent had a defined final diagnosis not fulfilling the criteria for a potentially life-threatening condition. Among these cases, 30.0% of prehospital assessments were retrospectively judged as potentially inappropriate. Conclusion:: Among patients who used EMS on multiple occasions, the most common symptoms on-scene were dyspnea, chest pain, and abdominal pain. The most common final diagnosis was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 13.0%, the final diagnosis of a potentially life-threatening condition was indicated. In a minority of these cases, the assessment on-scene was judged as potentially inappropriate. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017. 1-8 p.
Keyword [en]
assessment, diagnosis, Emergency Medical Services, multiple use
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-25047DOI: 10.1017/S1049023X17006458Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85018419799OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-25047DiVA: diva2:1098585
Available from: 2017-05-24 Created: 2017-05-24 Last updated: 2017-06-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Strömsöe, Anneli
By organisation
Medical Science
In the same journal
Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 36 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf