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The effectiveness of shade trees for urban heat mitigation, a comparative numerical simulation study
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Energy Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4573-0026
2016 (English)Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As a result of climate change, many regions are projected to see increases in air temperatures and extreme heat events over the coming decades. Since these trends are expected to exacerbate existing conditions in cites, urban heat mitigation will be one of the key challenges of the twenty-first century. A frequently advocated means of mitigating urban heat is through shade trees. Through the reduction of air and radiative temperatures trees not only improve outdoor human thermal comfort, but also reduce the cooling loads of buildings. This paper investigates the impact of different canopy cover ratios and tree layouts on the urban microclimate. The numerical simulation study utilizes four characteristic dense urban configurations from Budapest (Hungary) to assess the influences of these factors on the effectiveness of shade trees in mitigating urban heat. The study applies ENVI-met for microclimate simulation and MATLAB for the analysis and visualization of the results. Microclimate conditions within the urban canopy layer are examined on the basis of diurnal air and mean radiant temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that the effectiveness of shade trees is the function of the urban configurations' initial thermal performance. Since microclimate improvements by way of trees are primarily achieved through shading, greatest reduction in radiative temperatures is achieved in configurations with large open spaces. In the case of air temperature, increasing the canopy cover increases the added benefit of temperature reduction—indicating that reduced turbulence can in certain cases be beneficial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Energy, Forests and Built Environments
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-25457OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-25457DiVA: diva2:1118700
Conference
4th International Conference on Countermeasures to Urban Heat Island, Singapore
Available from: 2017-07-01 Created: 2017-07-01 Last updated: 2017-07-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(4671 kB)4 downloads
File information
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Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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Gál, Csilla V
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf