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Killing the Buddha: Towards a heretical philosophy of learning
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Educational Work. Örebro universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0298-3832
2017 (English)In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

This article explores how different philosophical models and pictures of learning can become dogmatic and disguise other conceptions of learning. With reference to a passage from St. Paul, I give a sense of the dogmatic teleology that underpins philosophical assumptions about learning. The Pauline assumption is exemplified through a variety of models of learning as conceptualised by Israel Scheffler. In order to show how the Paulinian dogmatism can give rise to radically different pictures of learning, the article turns to St. Augustine’s and Robert Brandom’s examples of language learning, and to general strands in scholarship on moral education. Dewey’s view of childhood immaturity and the problem of adult maturity are used as first attempt at a counter picture to the idea that learning must have an end. The article takes Dewey’s idea further by suggesting how the Zen-Buddhist idea of killing the Buddha and Wittgenstein’s method of destroying pictures work on the dogmatic focus on uses of ‘learning’ that assume ends. In conclusion, the article suggests three possible uses of ‘learning’—learning from wonder, intransitive learning and passionate learning—that do not assume that learning has or must have a teleological end. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
Philosophy of learning, learning, end, dogmatism, pictures, open-ended
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education and Learning; Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-25601DOI: 10.1080/00131857.2017.1336917Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020437697OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-25601DiVA: diva2:1127458
Available from: 2017-07-14 Created: 2017-07-14 Last updated: 2017-07-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf