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Urinary osteopontin predicts incident chronic kidney disease, while plasma osteopontin predicts cardiovascular death in elderly men
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2017 (English)In: CardioRenal Medicine, ISSN 1664-3828, Vol. 7, no 3, 245-254 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Objectives: The matricellular protein osteopontin is involved in the pathogenesis of both kidney and cardiovascular disease. However, whether circulating and urinary osteopontin levels are associated with the risk of these diseases is less studied.

Design, Setting, Participants, and Measurements: A community-based cohort of elderly men (Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men [ULSAM]; n = 741; mean age: 77 years) was used to study the associations between plasma and urinary osteopontin, incident chronic kidney disease, and the risk of cardiovascular death during a median of 8 years of follow-up.

Results: There was no significant cross-sectional correlation between plasma and urinary osteopontin (Spearman ρ = 0.07, p = 0.13). Higher urinary osteopontin, but not plasma osteopontin, was associated with incident chronic kidney disease in multivariable models adjusted for age, cardiovascular risk factors, baseline glomerular filtration rate, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, and the inflammatory markers interleukin 6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (odds ratio for 1 standard deviation [SD] of urinary osteopontin, 1.42, 95% CI 1.00-2.02, p = 0.048). Conversely, plasma osteopontin, but not urinary osteopontin, was independently associated with cardiovascular death (multivariable hazard ratio per SD increase, 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.58, p < 0.001, and 1.00, 95% CI 0.79-1.26, p = 0.99, respectively). The addition of plasma osteopontin to a model with established cardiovascular risk factors significantly increased the C-statistics for the prediction of cardiovascular death (p < 0.002).

Conclusions: Higher urinary osteopontin specifically predicts incident chronic kidney disease, while plasma osteopontin specifically predicts cardiovascular death. Our data put forward osteopontin as an important factor in the detrimental interplay between the kidney and the cardiovascular system. The clinical implications, and why plasma and urinary osteopontin mirror different pathologies, remain to be established.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 7, no 3, 245-254 p.
Keyword [en]
Atherosclerosis, Cardiovascular risk marker, Epidemiology, Protein, Renal disease
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-25602DOI: 10.1159/000476001ISI: 000404741600009PubMedID: 28736565Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020177472OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-25602DiVA: diva2:1127459
Available from: 2017-07-14 Created: 2017-07-14 Last updated: 2017-07-31Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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