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Relevance of urban trees and sun shades regarding summertime heat stress reduction – a field surveys from Pécs, Hungary
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Energy Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4573-0026
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mitigating the impact of summertime heat stress became the central issue of climate-conscious urban planning as a result of rising temperatures and continued urbanization trends. Furthermore, recent EU planning directives gave priority to nature-based solutions (NBS) and hence to re-naturing cities. Within the scope of the international Nature4Cities project fostering the use such solution, an inter- and cross-disciplinary research will be done assessing the performance of archetypal NBSs addressing different urban challenges – in this case, heat mitigation in urban environments.The objective of this particular study is to compare the effectiveness of natural and artificial shading solutions (urban trees and sun sails) in reducing summertime heat stress and enhancing outdoor thermal comfort of pedestrians. The Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET), used as performance indicator in this study, was calculated from field data. The measurement campaign utilizing two human-biometeorological stations recorded pedestrian-level radiant flux densities from six perpendicular directions, air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed on three late-summer days. The daytime measurements were conducted at three different urban settings in Pécs, a medium-size Central-European city.Our research found that mature trees with dense canopy have the highest heat stress reduction potential and could reduce the local PET by up to 10°C. Even though artificial sun sails blocked effectively direct solar exposure, the low-hanging sun sails became the sources of long-wave radiation which made the thermal comfort conditions below them somewhat worse compared to trees. Our study demonstrates the importance of small-scale field measurements, the outcomes of which are directly applicable in the climate-adaptive design of urban spaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Energy, Forests and Built Environments
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-26615OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-26615DiVA: diva2:1159875
Conference
21st International Congress of Biometeorology (ICB), Durham, UK. Sep 3–7 2017
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved

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Gál, Csilla V

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf