du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The association between relevant co-morbidities and prevalent as well as incident heart failure in patients with atrial fibrillation
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet, Uppsala universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6933-4637
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0914-5087, E-ISSN 1876-4738, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 26-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a serious complication in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

OBJECTIVE:

To study associations between relevant co-morbidities and CHF in patients with AF.

METHODS:

Study population included all adults (n=12,283) ≥45 years diagnosed with AF at 75 primary care centers in Sweden 2001-2007. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between co-morbidities, and prevalent CHF. In a subsample (n=9424), (excluding patients with earlier CHF), Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% CIs for the association between co-morbidities, and a first hospital diagnosis of CHF, after adjustment for age and socio-economic factors.

RESULTS:

During 5.4 years' follow-up (standard deviation 2.5), 2259 patients (24.0%; 1135 men, 21.8%, and 1124 women, 26.7%) were diagnosed with CHF. Patients with hypertension were less likely to have CHF, while a diagnosis of coronary heart disease, valvular heart disease, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), was consistently associated with CHF among men and women. CHF was more common among women with depression. The relative fully adjusted risk of incident CHF was increased for the following diseases in men with AF: valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and diabetes; and for the following diseases in women: valvular heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and COPD. The corresponding risk was decreased among women for hypertension.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this clinical setting we found hypertension to be associated with a decreased risk of CHF among women; valvular heart disease and diabetes to be associated with an increased risk of CHF in both sexes; and cardiomyopathy to be associated with an increased risk of CHF among men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 72, no 1, p. 26-32
Keywords [en]
Atrial fibrillation; Congestive heart failure; Gender; Hypertension
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-26989DOI: 10.1016/j.jjcc.2017.12.010PubMedID: 29358024Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85040616380OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-26989DiVA, id: diva2:1178190
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Ärnlöv, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ärnlöv, Johan
By organisation
Medical Science
In the same journal
Journal of Cardiology
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf