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Endothelial dysfunction is associated with impaired lung function in two independent community cohorts
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2018 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 143, p. 123-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Prior studies investigating the association between endothelial dysfunction and impaired lung function have been small and inconsistent. The primary aim was to investigate the association between endothelial function and lung function in two community-based cohorts.

Methods

We used a discovery/replication approach to study the association between endothelial function and lung function in the Prospective investigation of Obesity, Energy and Metabolism (POEM, discovery cohort, n = 490, mean age 50.3 ± 0.2 years) and the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS, replication cohort, n = 892, mean age 70.2 ± 0.15 years). Spirometry and three different measures of endothelial function were performed including both the invasive forearm technique (endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation [EDV and EIDV, respectively] and noninvasive flow mediated dilation [FMD]).

Results

An age and sex adjusted association between lower EDV and lower FEV1 was found in POEM and replicated in PIVUS. After merging the two cohorts, 1 standard deviation decrease in EDV was associated with 1.57% lower FEV1 after additional adjustment for smoking status, body mass index, exercise level, and C-reactive protein (95% confidence intervals 0.63–2.51, p = 0.001). The association was slightly lower albeit still statistically significant after excluding participants without cardiovascular disease and chronic respiratory disease and appeared stronger among previous/current smokers vs. non-smokers and in men vs. women (p for interaction = 0.2 and 0.02 respectively).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that even individuals with sub-clinical impairments of lung function in the community have concomitant endothelial dysfunction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 143, p. 123-128
Keywords [en]
Lung function, Endothelial function, Endothelial dependent vasodilation, Forced expiratory volume
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-28533DOI: 10.1016/j.rmed.2018.09.009ISI: 000445399500018PubMedID: 30261983Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053384922OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-28533DiVA, id: diva2:1252152
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved

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Ärnlöv, Johan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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