du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Selling nature with binomial names in late 18th and early 19th century – Linnaean nomenclature in Swedish and British auction catalogues
Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7334-6449
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

My paper will discuss the use of binomial names in the trade with natural history specimen in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Natural history specimen were typically sold at auctions. The preference for auctions is generally strong among sellers of perishable goods (e.g. fruit), or goods which are hard do price. Art objects but also natural history belong to the latter category, selling prices can typically fluctuate reflecting rapidly changing interests among buyers.

Linnaeus’s new nomenclature, introduced to an international audience in Species plantarum, published 1753, soon became accepted across Europe. It replaced the longer and instable diagnostic names, providing a short and easy to remember nomenclature for all living things to a growing audience of naturalists. In my paper I will explore how the new nomenclature made its way into the trade with natural history specimen and collections; foremost how it was used listing and grouping specimen in auction catalogues. The paper will draw on examples of Swedish and British catalogues printed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, including the catalogue listing the belongings of the Duchess of Portland, put up for sale in 1785. The Duchess owned one of the largest collections of shells in Europe. Shells had long been hot collectors’ item, shell traders were also, as Peter Dance put it, among “the tardiest converts” to Linnaeus’s new names. The catalogue listing the Duchess’s collection also illuminate the tension between different consumers of natural history, between those who ‘loved order’ and those who ‘loved variety’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-29198OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-29198DiVA, id: diva2:1273965
Conference
European Society of History Conference Session: Revolution: unity and disunity in European practices of natural history collecting, 1760-1815
Available from: 2018-12-26 Created: 2018-12-26 Last updated: 2018-12-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Hodacs, Hanna

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hodacs, Hanna
By organisation
History
History and Archaeology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf