du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A balance of social inclusion and risks: Staff perceptions of information and communication technology in the daily life of young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability in a social care context
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2511-9502
2019 (English)In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Information and communication technology (ICT) has increased in importance and facilitates participation in several life areas throughout society. However, young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability make less use ICT than the general population. Disability services staff play a central role in supporting and enabling service users in daily life, and their perceptions of ICT are important to their role in service provision. The aim of the study is to describe staff perceptions of the role of ICT and how it affects daily life in young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability living in residential homes. Focus group interviews and individual interviews were conducted with staff working in residential homes in which young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability live. All materials were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using latent content analysis. Staff perceived ICT and, more specifically, the Internet as being supportive of both daily life and social relationships of these young adults, but they also viewed ICT as posing social risks. Perceptions of and support for ICT were related to staff perceptions about what is appropriate and manageable in relation to an individual resident's functioning level. Staff members also considered the views of parents about appropriate content when providing support. Staff in residential homes for young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability use their implicit moral judgment about the use of ICT by residents. Their enablement of and support for ICT are not primarily based on the service user's wishes or interests. This finding implies a risk that the organization of a conflict-free service provision is a higher priority than service users' participation in social life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
information and communication technology, intellectual disabilities, moral work, participation, social care
National Category
Nursing Occupational Therapy Social Work
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-29665DOI: 10.1111/jppi.12278Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85062493953OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-29665DiVA, id: diva2:1296805
Available from: 2019-03-18 Created: 2019-03-18 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Marmstål Hammar, Lena

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Marmstål Hammar, Lena
By organisation
Caring Science/Nursing
In the same journal
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
NursingOccupational TherapySocial Work

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 286 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf