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Medical versus non medical etiology in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-Changes in outcome in relation to the revised Utstein template.
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2017 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 110, p. 48-55, article id S0300-9572(16)30522-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The Utstein-style recommendations for reporting etiology and outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from 2004 have recently been revised. Among other etiologies a medical category is now introduced, replacing the cardiac category from Utstein template 2004.

AIM: The aim of this study is to describe characteristics and temporal trends from reporting OHCA etiology according to the revised Utstein template 2014 in regards to patient characteristics and 30-day survival rates.

METHODS: This registry study is based on consecutive OHCA cases reported from the Emergency medical services (EMS) to the Swedish Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (SRCR) 1992-2014. Characteristics, including a presumed cardiac etiology in Utstein template 2004, were transcribed to a medical etiology in Utstein template 2014.

RESULTS: Of a total of n=70,846 cases, 92% were categorized as having a medical etiology and 8% as having a non-medical cause. Using the new classifications, the 30-day survival rate has significantly increased over a 20-year period from 4.7% to 11.0% in the medical group and from 3% to 9.9% in the non-medical group (p≤0.001). Trauma was the most common cause in OHCA of a non-medical etiology (26%) with a 30-day survival rate of 3.4% whilst drowning and drug overdose had the highest survival rates (14% and 10% respectively).

CONCLUSION: Based on Utstein 2014 categories of etiology, overall survival after OHCA with a medical etiology has more than doubled in a 20-year period and tripled for non-medical cases. Patients with a medical etiology found in a shockable rhythm have the highest chance of survival. There is great variability in characteristics among non-medical cases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 110, p. 48-55, article id S0300-9572(16)30522-6
Keywords [en]
CPR, EMS, Etiology, OHCA, Template, Utstein
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-31446DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.10.019PubMedID: 27826118OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-31446DiVA, id: diva2:1381502
Available from: 2019-12-22 Created: 2019-12-22 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved

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Strömsöe, Anneli

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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