du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Modeling mean radiant temperature in outdoor spaces: A comparative numerical simulation and validation study
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Energy Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4573-0026
2020 (English)In: Urban Climate, ISSN 2212-0955, E-ISSN 2212-0955, Vol. 32, article id 100571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The parameter governing outdoor human thermal comfort (HTC) on warm, clear-sky days is radiation. Its effect on HTC is accounted for by mean radiant temperature (Tmrt). While Tmrt differences owing to different measurement methods are well established, the impact of different computational approaches have not been systematically evaluated. This study assesses the performance of three microclimate models in their ability to estimate Tmrt values in complex urban environments. The evaluated models are RayMan Pro, SOLWEIG and ENVI-met. The model evaluation encompasses both the comparison of modeled Tmrt values with those derived from observations and model intercomparisons with analyses extending to several radiation terms and parameters that comprise or explain the resultant Tmrt. Results indicate that the models systematically underestimate nighttime Tmrt. SOLWEIG and ENVI-met tend to overestimate Tmrt during prolonged periods of shade and underestimate when the sites are sunlit. RayMan underestimates Tmrt values during most part of the day. The largest Tmrt errors occur at low sun elevations in all three models, mainly as a result of underestimated longwave emitted and shortwave reflected radiation fluxes by the adjacent facades. These errors indicate room for improvement with regards to surface temperature estimation and shortwave reflected radiation calculations in the models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 32, article id 100571
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Energy and Built Environments
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-31995DOI: 10.1016/j.uclim.2019.100571Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85079181206OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-31995DiVA, id: diva2:1394741
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(4427 kB)17 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 4427 kBChecksum SHA-512
768a26508b1ee09b70710cb04b61eaddb2ffe85f63124156b4e16f61ea30b3abf1e06de0b2b2ce4ce2ddab1baec34d08de79410e8f5be10fedaafbd5c6764a1d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Gál, Csilla V

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gál, Csilla VKántor, Noémi
By organisation
Energy Technology
In the same journal
Urban Climate
Climate Research

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 17 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 13 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf