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Preventing Stress-Related Ill Health Among New Registered Nurses by Supporting Engagement in Proactive Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Karolinska Institutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6388-5155
2020 (English)In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 202-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: New registered nurses (RNs) are at risk of developing symptoms of stress-related ill health.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of a 3 × 3 hour group intervention aiming to prevent symptoms of stress-related ill health among new RNs by increasing engagement in proactive behaviors. The intervention involves discussions and models of newcomer experiences and stress and the behavior change techniques reinforcing approach behaviors, systematic exposure, and action planning.

DESIGN: A randomized parallel group trial with an active control condition.

PARTICIPANTS: The study sample consisted of 239 new RNs participating in a transition-to-practice program for new RNs in a large county in Sweden.

METHODS: Participants were randomized to either the experimental intervention or a control intervention. Data on experiences of stress, avoidance of proactive behaviors, engagement in leisure activities, role clarity, task mastery, and social acceptance were collected before and after the intervention. Effects were evaluated using multilevel model analysis and regression analysis. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputation.

RESULTS: The control group experienced a statistically significant increase in experiences of stress during the period of the study (t(194.13) = 1.98, p = .049), whereas the level in the experimental group remained stable. Greater adherence to the intervention predicted a greater effect on experiences of stress (β = -0.15, p = .039) and social acceptance (β = 0.16, p = .027).

LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION: Transition-to-practice programs may benefit from adding an intervention that specifically addresses new RNs' experiences of stress to further support them as they adjust to their new professional role. However, replication studies with larger samples, more reliable measures, and longer periods of follow-up are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 17, no 3, p. 202-212
Keywords [en]
avoidance, intervention, new professionals, nurse well-being, organizational socialization, proactivity, randomized controlled trial, stress
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-36082DOI: 10.1111/wvn.12442PubMedID: 32592439OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-36082DiVA, id: diva2:1528009
Available from: 2021-02-12 Created: 2021-02-12 Last updated: 2021-02-16Bibliographically approved

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Rudman, Ann

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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Language
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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More languages
Output format
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