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Impact of epistasis and pleiotropy on evolutionary adaptation
Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences, Claremont, United States; Michigan State University, East Lansing, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4872-1961
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 279, no 1727, p. 247-256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evolutionary adaptation is often likened to climbing a hill or peak. While this process is simple for fitness landscapes where mutations are independent, the interaction between mutations (epistasis) as well as mutations at loci that affect more than one trait (pleiotropy) are crucial in complex and realistic fitness landscapes. We investigate the impact of epistasis and pleiotropy on adaptive evolution by studying the evolution of a population of asexual haploid organisms (haplotypes) in a model of N interacting loci, where each locus interacts with K other loci. We use a quantitative measure of the magnitude of epistatic interactions between substitutions, and find that it is an increasing function of K. When haplotypes adapt at high mutation rates, more epistatic pairs of substitutions are observed on the line of descent than expected. The highest fitness is attained in landscapes with an intermediate amount of ruggedness that balance the higher fitness potential of interacting genes with their concomitant decreased evolvability. Our findings imply that the synergism between loci that interact epistatically is crucial for evolving genetic modules with high fitness, while too much ruggedness stalls the adaptive process. © 2012 The Royal Society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society , 2012. Vol. 279, no 1727, p. 247-256
Keywords [en]
Epistasis, Evolution, Gene networks, Strong mutation, adaptive radiation, evolutionary biology, fitness, mutation, pleiotropy, quantitative analysis, synergism
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-37194DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.0870Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-82955229552OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-37194DiVA, id: diva2:1557631
Available from: 2021-05-26 Created: 2021-05-26 Last updated: 2021-05-26Bibliographically approved

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Hintze, Arend

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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