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Quality control of waste to incineration: waste composition analysis in Lidköping
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8434-1747
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1057-5401
2005 (English)In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 527-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to decrease environmental impacts in waste management the choice of treatment method must be based on the characteristics of the waste. Present sampling procedures do not provide statistically representative samples of solid waste and this provides difficulties in characterization. The objective of this study was to develop a procedure for waste component analysis and sampling of waste after collection and at plant level. A further objective was to characterize the waste delivered to an incineration plant for physical and chemical properties and to determine the amounts of delivered waste that could be classified as biofuels and fossil fuels. The proportions of recyclables and hazardous waste were also examined. Samples were taken randomly from waste trucks and divided by square implementation. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the number of sub-samples could be decreased with only a moderate increase in the confidence interval. This means that future waste composition analyses could be made more efficient and thereby less expensive. The analysis of the waste delivered to the Lidkoping incineration plant (Central Sweden) showed that 66.4% of the household waste was composed of biofuels and 21.3% of non-renewable combustibles, of which 40.3% were recyclables. In addition, 11.6% of the household waste was non-combustible and 0.6% hazardous waste. The heat value for the biofuels was 18.0-19.7 MJ kg(-1) dry mass (DM) and for the fossil fuels 28.2-33.9 MJ kg(-1) DM. The industrial waste consisted of 35.9% biofuels, 62.0% fossil fuels, 1.6% non-combustible and 0.5% hazardous waste. The heat value was 19.5 MJ kg(-1) DM for the biofuels and 31.4 MJ kg(-1) DM for the fossil fuels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 23, no 6, p. 527-533
Keywords [en]
characterisation; houshold waste; industrial waste; heat value; waste component analysis
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Komplexa system - mikrodataanalys
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-502DOI: 10.1177/0734242X05060710ISI: 000234059600005OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:502DiVA, id: diva2:519360
Available from: 2004-11-04 Created: 2004-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Mattsson Petersen, CeciliaRönnegård, Lars

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