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Use of motivational interviewing in smoking cessation at nurse-led chronic obstructive pulmonary disease clinics
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3964-196X
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 4, 767-782 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. This paper is a report of a study to describe to what extent Registered Nurses, with a few days of education in motivational interviewing based communication, used motivational interviewing in smoking cessation communication at nurse-led chronic obstructive pulmonary disease clinics in primary health care.

Background. For smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease the most crucial and evidence-based intervention is smoking cessation. Motivational interviewing is often used in healthcare to support patients to quit smoking.

Method. The study included two videotaped consultations, the first and third of three at the clinic, with each of 13 smokers. Data were collected from March 2006 to April 2007. The nurses’ smoking cessation communication was analysed using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity scale. To get an impression of the consultation, five parameters were judged on a five-point Likert-scale, with five indicating best adherence to Motivational Interviewing.

Results. Evocation’, ‘collaboration’, ‘autonomy-support’ and ‘empathy’ averaged between 1·31 and 2·23 whereas ‘direction’ scored five in all consultations. Of communication behaviours, giving information was the most frequently used, followed by ‘closed questions’, ‘motivational interviewing non–adherent’ and ‘simple reflections’. ‘Motivational interviewing adherent’, ‘open questions’ and ‘complex reflections’ occurred rarely. There were no important individual or group-level differences in any of the ratings between the first and the third consultations.

Conclusion. In smoking cessation communication the nurses did not employ behaviours that are important in motivational interviewing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell , 2012. Vol. 68, no 4, 767-782 p.
Keyword [en]
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; communication; motivational interviewing; nurse-led clinics; primary health care; smoking cessation; video-taped consultations
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Hälsa och välfärd, Interaktion mellan patient och sjuksköterska på KOL-sjuksköterskemottagning i primärvård.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-5611DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05766.xISI: 000301426000006OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:5611DiVA: diva2:520377
Available from: 2011-06-27 Created: 2011-06-27 Last updated: 2015-06-22Bibliographically approved

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Österlund Efraimsson, EvaEhrenberg, Anna
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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More languages
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