du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The impact of body mass index and the metabolic syndrome on the risk of diabetes in middle-aged men
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6933-4637
2011 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 34, no 1, 61-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The existence of an obese subgroup with a healthy metabolic profile and low diabetes risk has been proposed; yet long-term data are lacking. We aimed to investigate associations between combinations of BMI categories and metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged men.

Research design and methods: At age 50, cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 1,675 participants without diabetes in the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM) study. According to BMI/metabolic syndrome status, they were categorized as normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m2) without metabolic syndrome (National Cholesterol Education Program criteria, n = 853), normal weight with metabolic syndrome (n = 60), overweight (BMI 25–30 kg/m2) without metabolic syndrome (n = 557), overweight with metabolic syndrome (n = 117), obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) without metabolic syndrome (n = 28), and obese with metabolic syndrome (n = 60). We investigated the associations between BMI/metabolic syndrome categories at baseline and diabetes incidence.

Results: After 20 years, 160 participants had developed diabetes. In logistic regression models adjusting for age, smoking, and physical activity, increased risks for diabetes were observed in the normal weight with metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 3.28 [95% CI] 1.38–7.81; P = 0.007), overweight without metabolic syndrome (3.49 [2.26–5.42]; P < 0.001), overweight with metabolic syndrome (7.77 [4.44–13.62]; P < 0.001), obese without metabolic syndrome (11.72 [4.88–28.16]; P < 0.001), and obese with metabolic syndrome (10.06 [5.19–19.51]; P < 0.001) categories compared with the normal weight without metabolic syndrome category.

Conclusions: Overweight or obese men without metabolic syndrome were at increased risk for diabetes. Our data provide further evidence that overweight and obesity in the absence of the metabolic syndrome should not be considered a harmless condition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Alexandria: American Diabetes Association , 2011. Vol. 34, no 1, 61-65 p.
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Hälsa och välfärd
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-5761DOI: 10.2337/dc10-0955ISI: 000286497000014PubMedID: 20852030OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:5761DiVA: diva2:520406
Available from: 2011-08-31 Created: 2011-08-31 Last updated: 2015-06-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ärnlöv, Johan
By organisation
Medical Science
In the same journal
Diabetes Care
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 559 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf