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Does oral health matter in people’s daily life?: Oral health-related quality of life in adults 35–47 years of age in Norway
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7972-1470
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 10, no 1, 15-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of oral health on aspects of daily life measured by the Dental Impact Profile (DIP) in 35- to 47-year-old individuals in Norway, and to study associations between reported effects and demographic variables, subjectively assessed oral health, general health, oral health behaviour and clinical oral health.

Material and methods: A stratified randomized sample of 249 individuals received a questionnaire regarding demographic questions, dental visits, oral hygiene behaviour, self-rated oral health and general health and satisfaction with oral health. The DIP measured the effects of oral health on daily life. Teeth present and caries experience were registered by clinical examination. Bi- and multivariate analyses and factor analysis were used.

Results: Items most frequently reported to be positively or negatively influenced by oral health were chewing and biting, eating, smiling and laughing, feeling comfortable and appearance. Only 1% reported no effects of oral health. Individuals with fewer than two decayed teeth, individuals who rated their oral health as good or practised good oral health habits reported more positive effects than others on oral quality of life (P = 0.05). When the variables were included in multivariate analysis, none was statistically significant. The subscales of the DIP were somewhat different from the originally suggested subscales.

Conclusions: This study showed that most adults reported oral health to be important for masticatory functions and confirmed that oral health also had impacts on other aspects of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell , 2012. Vol. 10, no 1, 15-21 p.
Keyword [en]
adult;Dental Impact Profile;epidemiology;oral health–related quality of life;self-rated oral health
National Category
Nursing Dentistry
Research subject
Hälsa och välfärd, Munhälsorelaterad livskvalitet i Norge
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-6107DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-5037.2011.00533.xISI: 000299100000004PubMedID: 22081938OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:6107DiVA: diva2:520504
Available from: 2011-12-06 Created: 2011-12-06 Last updated: 2015-10-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
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