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Narration, Visualization and Mind: Movies in everyday life as a resource for utopian self-reflection
Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Media and Communication Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7883-3251
2010 (English)In: CMRC, The 7th International Conference on Media, Religion & Culture, Toronto, Canada, 2010Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The paper is analyzing how people in late modern society characterized by de-traditionalization, use moving images as a cultural resource for the construction of meaningful subjective world views. As a theoretical concept with several dimensions, “sacralization of the self” (Woodhead & Heelas 2000: 344), is related to media theory. With a critical focus on ‘the self’, as a core aspect in contemporary media society Eric W. Rothenbuhler labels the individual self as one of “the sacred objects of modern culture” (Rothenbuhler 2006: 31). I want to emphasize the need for case studies in order to undertake a critical investigation about ‘the self’ and how consumption of fiction film is interconnected to spectator´s creation of self images, but also to understand how film engagement elicits self-reflection (Giddens 1991, Axelson 2008, Vaage 2009a). The paper make use of empirical data to illustrate and theoretically develop perspectives on how the audience uses fiction film in every-day life for the construction of the self, as well for the construction of more profound and long-lasting ideas of being part of a moral community (Brereton 2005, Jerslev 2006, Klinger 2008, Mikkola et al. 2007, Vaage 2009b). Some empirical findings support a conclusion that moving images creates a transitional space for the human mind, with the capacity of transporting the spectator from real life to fiction and back to real life again, helping the individual with an ongoing process of transforming the self, dealing with who you actually are, and who you want to become (Axelson 2008, Vaage 2009b).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Toronto, Canada, 2010.
Keyword [en]
Visual Culture, self reflexivity, world views, utopian reflexivity, film, religion, late modernity, narration, visualization
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-4958OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:4958DiVA: diva2:522166
Conference
CMRC, The 7th International Conference on Media, Religion & Culture , Toronto, Canada, 9-13 augusti 2010, 2010
Available from: 2010-09-27 Created: 2010-09-27 Last updated: 2015-05-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf