du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
“Teaching in English? What do you expect? Defining goals and expectations of CLIL in the Swedish upper-secondary school”
Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9024-330X
2011 (English)In: 16th World Congress of Applied Linguistics (AILA2011): Harmony in diversity: language, culture, society, Beijing, China, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Language and subject-integrated teaching, often referred to as CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning), but even sometimes as language immersion or bilingual education, has increased in Swedish schools in recent years. In the last survey conducted by The Swedish National Agency for Education in 2000, it was found that there was some form of teaching in other languages than Swedish––everything from the entire teaching of a subject in a foreign language to occasional theme days or projects in various languages––in at least 20% of Swedish upper secondary schools. However, there are not actually any current figures on the number of schools offering CLIL instruction; and, as the term CLIL includes schools with very different degrees of integration of language and subject studies, the true amount of teaching in another language is difficult to estimate. CLIL thus remains a broad concept that has not been defined clearly in the Swedish school system. Additionally, recent research in Sweden has indicated that the schools offering CLIL lack clearly defined goals, especially in regards to language acquisition. The Swedish National Agency for Education suggests that the target is a not fully bilingual student, but rather students with “functional competence in the target language.” Although the agency has called for greater documentation by schools to monitor the progress made by students as well as the methods used in teaching and learning, Swedish schools offering CLIL generally lack a thorough description of practice and an evaluation of results. Furthermore, the various stakeholders in CLIL education (students, parents, teachers, and administrators) each have their own objectives and goals, but how these are followed up at school (such as through teaching and evaluation methods) and if these are achieved is not clear. The author’s present research is concerned with the identification of the extent and scope of CLIL in English language medium upper-secondary schools in Sweden today as well as the identification of existing goals and objectives of said form of education. The proposed presentation will present the first results of the study: the extent and scope of CLIL in upper-secondary schools today, with a focus on how the schools are presenting CLIL to potential students and how—and if—they are formulating their specific goals in regards to English language proficiency. How is the educational option being presented by and to the potential stakeholders? Why is English being offered as the medium of instruction? How is CLIL defined by and for the stakeholders? This data will be collected during the academic year 2010-2011, and will be followed by a deeper investigation of the CLIL classroom in the subsequent two years. Educational ethnographical methods will be used to map CLIL in practice and to relate this practice to the previously identified goals and expectations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Beijing, China, 2011.
Keyword [en]
CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning, English language medium upper-secondary schools, school websites
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-5817OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:5817DiVA: diva2:522367
Conference
16th World Congress of Applied Linguistics (AILA2011): Harmony in diversity: language, culture, society, Beijing, China, August 23-28, 2011, 2011
Available from: 2011-09-02 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2016-01-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Yoxsimer Paulsrud, BethAnne
By organisation
English

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 559 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf