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To lose contact with your unborn child
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7385-5649
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4875-1407
2010 (English)In: The 18th Congress of the Nordic Federation of Midwives, Copenhagen, 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: A dead child can not move. When a mother experiences that the movement pattern of her unborn child changes, or is absent, this can be a sign that the child has died. There is a lack of knowledge about how mothers experiences that something has happened their child intrauterine. Purpose: To study the mothers experiences of the period of time that preceded them being told that their child has died intrauterine. Method: In-depth interviews with 26 mothers whose children died prior birth, analysed with content analysis. Results: Twenty two of the 26 interviewied mothers had experienced a premonition that something might be wrong with their unborn child, prior to them being told that their child had died. The overall theme "Something is not right" emerged in the analysis. The mothers premonitions can be described as a process from a vaugh to a increasingly strong feeling that something was not wright with their child. For some mothers the feeling developed in to a realization that the life of the child might be threatened, but for most mothers it was incomprehensible that a child could die prior birth. In the analysis, six categories describing the experiences of the mothers,were identified; 1. Feeling no contact with the child; 2. Feeling anxiety; 3. Feeling that something is wrong; 4. Not comprehending the incomprehensible; 5. Wanting to know; 6. Being certain that the child is dead. Conclusion: The mothers had a feeling that something was not right, prior to being told of the death of their child. Thay felt an anxiety that they tried to control by normalazing the absence of movement by the child. The mothers anxiety was met by family and health care personnel with the explanation that expecting mothers generally feel anxious, and they should wait. The absent of fetal movement was given the explanation that the children move less, or not at all, at the end of a pregnancy. Implications: Expecting mothers should be encouraged to seek medical care when their child meves less or not at all at the end of the pregnancy. There is a lack of evidence in order to normalize the experience of mothers that feel that their child moves less at the end of the pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen, 2010.
Series
Book of abstracts
Keyword [en]
Stillbirth, premonition, insight, attachment, fetal movement, content analysis
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-5973OAI: oai:dalea.du.se:5973DiVA: diva2:522428
Conference
The 18th Congress of the Nordic Federation of Midwives , Copenhagen, 3 - 5 juni, 2010
Available from: 2011-09-29 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2015-06-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf