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Education in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Sweden and its clinical consequences
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6885-991x
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2010 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 81, no 2, 211-216 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training programmes in Sweden for 25 years and relate those to changes in the percentage of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) who receive bystander CPR.

Methods: Information was gathered from (a) the Swedish CPR training registry established in 1983 and includes most Swedish education programmes in CPR and (b) the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register (SCAR) established in 1990 and currently covers about 70% of ambulance districts in Sweden.

Results: CPR education in Sweden functions according to a cascade principle (instructor-trainers who train instructors who then train rescuers in CPR). Since 1989, 5000 instructor-trainers have taught more than 50,000 instructors who have taught nearly 2 million of Sweden's 9 million inhabitants adult CPR. This is equivalent to one new rescuer per 100 inhabitants every year in Sweden. In addition, since 1989, there are 51,000 new rescuers in Advanced Life Support (ALS), since 1996, 41,000 new Basic Life Support (BLS) rescuers with Automated External Defibrillation (AED) training, and since 1998, there are 93,000 new rescuers in child CPR. As a result of this CPR training the number of bystander CPR attempts for OHCA in Sweden increased from 31% in 1992 to 55% in 2007.

Conclusion: By using a cascade principle for CPR education nearly 2 million rescuers were educated in Sweden (9 million inhabitants) between 1989 and 2007. This resulted in a marked increase in bystander CPR attempts. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 81, no 2, 211-216 p.
Keyword [en]
Cardiac arrest; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Education
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare, En utvärdering av insatser, behandling och utfall vid hjärtstopp på och utanför sjukhus ett nationellt samhälls- och sjukhusperspektiv
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-10507DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.10.014ISI: 000274982500013PubMedID: 19926389OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-10507DiVA: diva2:542792
Available from: 2012-08-03 Created: 2012-08-03 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
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  • Other style
More styles
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  • sv-SE
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Output format
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