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Scanlation: Foreign Fans of Japanese Subculture Translating Manga
Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
2012 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The subculture of manga (Japanese comics) and anime (Japanese animations) has been exported to practically all over the world, including U.S., Europe, Asia and Latin America, creating the fandom that could affect one’s identity on various levels. One example of very direct influence of this subculture could be found in cosplay, where fans dress up as their favourite manga or anime characters, and often participate in a competition.

On the other level of influence, the crave for “more of” manga/anime work could make the fans adopt the identity as creators, or sometimes translators. There are numerous secondary creations, in the form of amateur novels or manga, creating new episodes, using the existing manga or anime characters. Another way to “have more” is to be able to read/see the newest episode of particular manga or anime work as soon as possible, or to be able to appreciate the works which have not been released outside Japan. In this case, the fans could adopt the role of not the creator but the translator.

In fact, one can find the newest manga/anime episode within few days or even hours after its release in Japan, translated into other languages and subtitled (in case of anime). These scanlation (in case of manga) and fansub (in case of anime) works are all released on internet for free. In fact, the whole process of scanlating, that is scanning the original material, cleaning the image, translating, and editing – is done for free, normally by teams of fans. The translation into English and Chinese are often done from the original Japanese version, which means fan translators have somehow learned Japanese language.

The presentation will be on the manga subculture outside Japan, with its special focus on scanlation, an exercise very popular among manga fans in spite of its dubious legal status (in relation to the copyright). Academically this field is not yet studied extensively, and the presentation will introduce the overall structure and situation of this fan translation of manga.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
manga, anime, scanlation, fandom, translation
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Kultur, identitet och gestaltning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-10660OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-10660DiVA: diva2:549641
Conference
International Conference "Identity, Culture and Communication", Saint Louis University, Madrid,19-21 April, 2012
Available from: 2012-09-05 Created: 2012-09-05 Last updated: 2013-01-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf