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Maximal work capacity and performance depends warm-up procedure and environmental but not inspired air temperatures
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8360-2100
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Exercise Physiology - Online, ISSN 1097-9751, E-ISSN 1097-9751, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to compare peak (VO 2 peak) and maximal (VO 2 max) oxygen uptake, physical performance, and lactate accumulation [la-] in warm versus cold environments. The influence of inhaled air temperature and different warm up modes on these variables as well as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO 2%) and pulmonary function were also studied. Two studies were performed. In study A, 10 males performed maximal exercise tests on a bicycle at +20°C and -12°C. In study B, 8 elite cross-country skiers performed maximal cross-country skiing tests at +13.7°C. Different warm up modes (continuous and intermittent) and different temperatures of the inhaled air (-8°C and +13°C) were used. In study A, we found significantly higher VO 2 peak, peak carbon dioxide (VCO 2 peak), peak ventilation (V E peak) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) in +20°C compared to -12°C. In study B, we found significantly lower SaO 2% at the end compared to the beginning of the maximal performance test. Time to exhaustion (T ex) was significantly longer using intermittent warm up irrespectively of inhaled air temperature. In conclusion, we found that VO 2 max was affected by different environmental temperatures but not by different temperatures of the inhaled air and that intermittent warm up increased T ex without affecting VO 2 max.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 15, no 1, p. 26-39
Keyword [en]
Arterial desaturation; Asthma; Cold; Cross-country skiing; Oxygen uptake
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-12536Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84857204391OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-12536DiVA, id: diva2:622829
Available from: 2013-05-23 Created: 2013-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Hammarström, Daniel

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf