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School district administrators’ perspectives on the professional activities and influence of special educators in Norway and Sweden
University of Agder, Norway.
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education. Uppsala universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4793-871X
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 18, no 7, 669-685 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to investigate school district administrators’ perspectives concerning the professional activities and influence of special educators in Norway (n=266) and Sweden (n=290). We examine three themes drawn from a survey of practices and policies in each country: (a) the organisational arrangements in which special educators work, (b) perceived changes in special educators’ activities, and (c) ratings of special educators’ influence on the content of instruction and the availability of resources for children with special needs. Findings suggest that special educators frequently work in teams, function largely as advisors, and spend less time working with individual students than in previous years. There appears to be a more pronounced increase in special educators’ time devoted to advising and documentation in Sweden than in Norway. Swedish special educators were also more frequently described as working in multidisciplinary teams. Participants in both countries rated the influence of special educators significantly higher than that of parents and teachers on the availability and distribution of resources; and significantly higher than politicians, public officials, teachers, and parents with regard to influence over the content of instruction. We discuss these findings in relation to the goals and development of inclusive education in Scandinavia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014. Vol. 18, no 7, 669-685 p.
Keyword [en]
special educational needs; special educator; profession; inclusion; Scandinavia
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education and Learning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-12582DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2013.803609ISI: 000338013900002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-12582DiVA: diva2:627106
Available from: 2013-06-11 Created: 2013-06-11 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf