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Design considerations with ventilation-radiators: Comparisons to traditional two-panel radiators
Department of Fluid and Climate Technology, School of Technology and Health, KTH, Alfred Nobels Allé 10, SE-14152 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. (Energi, skog och byggd miljö)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9943-9878
Department of Fluid and Climate Technology, School of Technology and Health, KTH, Alfred Nobels Allé 10, SE-14152 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
2009 (English)In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, Vol. 41, no 1, 92-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2009. Vol. 41, no 1, 92-100 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-14190DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2008.07.014ISI: 000261483800011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-14190DiVA: diva2:722980
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 30326-1
Note

Performance of heat emitters in a room is affected by their interaction with the ventilation system. A radiator gives more heat output with increased air flow along its heat transferring surface, and with increased thermal difference to surrounding air. Radiator heat output and comfort temperatures in a small one-person office were studied using different positions for the ventilation air inlet. In two of the four test cases the air inlet was placed between radiator panels to form ventilation-radiator systems. Investigations were made by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations, and included visualisation of thermal comfort conditions, as well as radiator heat output comparisons. The room model was exhaust-ventilated, with an air exchange rate equal to what is recommended for Swedish offices (7 l s1 per person) and cold infiltration air (5 8C) typical of a winter day in Stockholm.

Results showed that under these conditions ventilation-radiators were able to create a more stable thermal climate than the traditional radiator ventilation arrangements. In addition, when using ventilation-radiators the desired thermal climate could be achieved with a radiator surface temperature as much as 7.8C lower. It was concluded that in exhaust-ventilated office rooms, ventilation-radiators can provide energy and environmental savings.

Available from: 2014-06-10 Created: 2014-06-10 Last updated: 2015-10-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
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