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Challenging Normativity: Fan fiction writing on the Internet
Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Portuguese. (Literature, Identity and Transculturality)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2008-4873
2012 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Fandom culture is a subculture that have emerged and developed explosively on the internet during the last decades. Fans are engaged in a participatory culture and creating their own films, translations, fiction, fan art and role play. Their work is based on familiar popular culture creations like books, television-series, anime, manga stories and games. In this paper I will focus on fan fiction, one of these subculture genres.

Previous studies have concluded that fan fiction activity on the internet, as a highly interactive and creative culture, have a very positive effect on participating individuals, concerning issues of identity formation as well as their development of language and social skills. In self created fan fiction communities the participants read, write, give constructive comments and tutor on one another’s stories. These stories can be engaged in filling gaps in the original story, explaining what happened before or after, developing or explaining original characters and much more. In these communities the participants have also developed an impressive new range of genres and concepts to describe and categorize their new texts.

In my presentation I will focus my literary analysis mainly on two of these subgenres that focus directly on representations of gender and available subject positions in society.

These subgenres are slash, same sex romantic pairings between two characters who are heterosexual in the original story, and gender-bender, where the original character changes sex. From a re-writing perspective fan fiction - where young people re-stage their favorite characters in new settings and plots - can be analyzed as an expression of testing out new subject positions within human relations, as well as trying out different sexual identities. Using an intersectional (gender, class, sexuality and ethnicity) research perspective I will discuss how their literary characters relate to the hetero-normative discourse which dictates identity construction in society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
Participatory Culture, Fan culture, Fan fiction, Slash, Gender-Bender.
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Kultur, identitet och gestaltning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-14411OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-14411DiVA: diva2:726729
Conference
Identity, Culture & Communication Conference Saint Louis University - Madrid, Spain 19-21 April 2012
Projects
Informella internetbaserade lärmiljöer
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2015-04-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf