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Plasma parathyroid hormone is associated with vascular dementia and cerebral hyperintensities in two community-based cohorts
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 99, no 11, 4181-4189 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: In diseases with increased PTH such as hyperparathyroidism and chronic renal failure, dementia is common. Little is known of PTH and dementia in the community.

Objective: We sought to investigate relations between PTH, clinical dementia and cerebral micro-vascular disease. Setting and Design: The Uppsala Longitudinal Study Of Adult Men (ULSAM) was prospective, baseline, 1991-1995; followup, 15.8 years. The Prospective Investigation Of The Vasculature In Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) was cross-sectional, baseline, 2001. Both settings were community based.

Participants and Main Outcome Measure: In the ULSAM study of 998 men (age 71) the association between PTH and dementia was investigated. In the PIVUS study of 406 men and women (age 70) the relation between PTH and magnetic resonance imaging signs of cerebral small vascular disease was investigated.

Results: During followup, 56 individuals were diagnosed with vascular, 91 with Alzheimer's, and 59 with other dementias. In Cox-regression analyses, higher PTH was associated with vascular dementia (hazard ratio per 1 SD increase of PTH, 1.41; P < .01), but not with other dementias. The top tertile of PTH accounted for 18.5% of the population-attributable risk for vascular dementia, exceeding all other risk factors. In linear regression analysis in PIVUS, PTH was associated with increasing white matter hyperintensities (WMHI), reflecting increasing burden of cerebral small vessel disease (1 SD PTH increase, 0.31 higher category of WMHI; P = .016). All models were adjusted for vascular risk factors and mineral metabolism.

Conclusions: In two community-based samples, PTH predicted clinically diagnosed and neuroimaging indices of vascular dementia and cerebral small vessel disease. Our data suggest a role for PTH in the development of vascular dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 99, no 11, 4181-4189 p.
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Health and Welfare
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-15287DOI: 10.1210/jc.2014-1736ISI: 000346743100035PubMedID: 25140397OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-15287DiVA: diva2:745015
Available from: 2014-09-09 Created: 2014-09-09 Last updated: 2016-01-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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