du.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Flipped classroom and learning strategies
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2110-0943
Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of 14th European Conference on e-Learning / [ed] Jefferies, A., Cubric, M., Barton, K. & Lilley, M., Reading, UK: Academic Conferences Publishing, 2015, 41-49 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper seeks to answer the research question "How does the flipped classroom affect students’ learning strategies?" In e-learning research, several studies have focused on how students and teachers perceive the flipped classroom approach. In general, these studies have reported pleasing results. Nonetheless, few, if any, studies have attempted to find out the potential effects of the flipped classroom approach on how students learn.

This study was based on two cases: 1) a business modelling course and 2) a research methodology course. In both cases, participating students were from information systems courses at Dalarna University in Sweden. Recorded lectures replaced regular lectures. The recorded lectures were followed by seminars that focused on the learning content of each lecture in various ways.

Three weeks after the final seminar, we arranged for two focus group interviews to take place in each course, with 8 to 10 students participating in each group. We asked open questions on how the students thought they had been affected and more dedicated questions that were generated from a literature study on the effects of flipped classroom courses. These questions dealt with issues about mobility, the potential for repeating lectures, formative feedback, the role of seminars, responsibility, empowerment, lectures before seminars, and any problems encountered.

Our results show that, in general, students thought differently about learning after the courses in relation to more traditional approaches, especially regarding the need to be more active. Most students enjoyed the mobility aspect and the accessibility of recorded lectures, although a few claimed it demanded a more disciplined attitude. Most students also expressed a feeling of increased activity and responsibility when participating in seminars. Some even felt empowered because they could influence seminar content. The length of and possibility to navigate in recorded lectures was also considered important. The arrangement of the seminar rooms should promote face-to-face discussions. Finally, the types of questions and tasks were found to affect the outcomes of the seminars.

The overall conclusion with regard to students’ learning strategies is that to be an active, responsible, empowered, and critical student you have to be an informed student with possibilities and mandate to influence how, where and when to learn and be able to receive continuous feedback during the learning process. Flipped classroom can support such learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading, UK: Academic Conferences Publishing, 2015. 41-49 p.
Keyword [en]
Flipped classroom, learning strategies, active learning, responsibility, empowerment
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, General Microdata Analysis - others
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-19951ISI: 000371972900006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-19951DiVA: diva2:867602
Conference
14th European Conference on e-Learning, Hatfield, UK, 29-30 October, 2015
Projects
NGL
Available from: 2015-11-05 Created: 2015-11-05 Last updated: 2016-04-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(414 kB)432 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 414 kBChecksum SHA-512
c1211781f159baa2df429975be9d2f9aad98a5beed36fd58734109e20fde34a31491629bd365f08955b5e982dc9130b945f8d8af022979d27546d2e791950826
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Avdic, AndersÅkerblom, Leif
By organisation
Information Systems
Information Systems, Social aspects

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 432 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 1533 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf