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  • 1. Abzhandadze, Tamar
    et al.
    Reinholdsson, Malin
    Palstam, Annie
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Gothenburg.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S
    Transforming self-reported outcomes from a stroke register to the modified Rankin Scale: a cross-sectional, explorative study.2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 17215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to create an algorithm to transform self-reported outcomes from a stroke register to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Two stroke registers were used: the Väststroke, a local register in Gothenburg, Sweden, and the Riksstroke, a Swedish national register. The reference variable, mRS (from Väststroke), was mapped with seven self-reported questions from Riksstroke. The transformation algorithm was created as a result of manual mapping performed by healthcare professionals. A supervised machine learning method-decision tree-was used to further evaluate the transformation algorithm. Of 1145 patients, 54% were male, the mean age was 71 y. The mRS grades 0, 1 and 2 could not be distinguished as a result of manual mapping or by using the decision tree analysis. Thus, these grades were merged. With manual mapping, 78% of the patients were correctly classified, and the level of agreement was almost perfect, weighted Kappa (Kw) was 0.81. With the decision tree, 80% of the patients were correctly classified, and substantial agreement was achieved, Kw = 0.67. The self-reported outcomes from a stroke register can be transformed to the mRS. A mRS algorithm based on manual mapping might be useful for researchers using self-reported questionnaire data.

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  • 2.
    Andersen, Randi Dovland
    et al.
    Department of Research Telemark Hospital Skien Norway; Research Center for Habilitation and Rehabilitation Services and Models (CHARM) Institute of Health and Society University of Oslo Oslo Norway.
    Genik, Lara
    Department of Psychology University of Guelph Guelph ON Canada.
    Alriksson-Schmidt, Ann I
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund Skåne University Hospital Orthopedics Lund University Lund Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    University Health Care Research Center and Swedish Institute for Disability Research Faculty of Medicine and Health Örebro University Örebro Sweden.
    Burkitt, Chantel
    Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare Saint Paul MN USA; Department of Educational Psychology University of Minnesota Minneapolis MN USA.
    Bruflot, Sindre K
    Telemark Chapter of the Norwegian Cerebral Palsy Association Skien Norway.
    Chambers, Christine T
    Departments of Psychology & Neuroscience and Pediatrics Dalhousie University Halifax NS Canada; Centre for Pediatric Pain Research IWK Health Centre Nova Scotia Canada.
    Jahnsen, Reidun B
    Research Center for Habilitation and Rehabilitation Services and Models (CHARM) Institute of Health and Society University of Oslo Oslo Norway; Department of Clinical Neurosciences for Children Oslo University Hospital Oslo Norway.
    Jeglinsky-Kankainen, Ira
    Department of Health and Welfare Arcada University of Applied Sciences Helsinki Finland.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Pain burden in children with cerebral palsy (CPPain) survey: Study protocol2022In: Paediatric & neonatal pain, ISSN 2637-3807, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is a significant health concern for children living with cerebral palsy (CP). There are no population-level or large-scale multi-national datasets using common measures characterizing pain experience and interference (ie, pain burden) and management practices for children with CP. The aim of the CPPain survey is to generate a comprehensive understanding of pain burden and current management of pain to change clinical practice in CP. The CPPain survey is a comprehensive cross-sectional study. Researchers plan to recruit approximately 1400 children with CP (primary participants) across several countries over 6-12 months using multimodal recruitment strategies. Data will be collected from parents or guardians of children with CP (0-17 years) and from children with CP (8-17 years) who are able to self-report. Siblings (12-17 years) will be invited to participate as controls. The CPPain survey consists of previously validated and study-specific questionnaires addressing demographic and diagnostic information, pain experience, pain management, pain interference, pain coping, activity and participation in everyday life, nutritional status, mental health, health-related quality of life, and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on pain and access to pain care. The survey will be distributed primarily online. Data will be analyzed using appropriate statistical methods for comparing groups. Stratification will be used to investigate subgroups, and analyses will be adjusted for appropriate sociodemographic variables. The Norwegian Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics and the Research Ethics Board at the University of Minnesota in USA have approved the study. Ethics approval in Canada, Sweden, and Finland is pending. In addition to dissemination through peer-reviewed journals and conferences, findings will be communicated through the CPPain Web site (www.sthf.no/cppain), Web sites directed toward users or clinicians, social media, special interest groups, stakeholder engagement activities, articles in user organization journals, and presentations in public media.

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  • 3. Bergström, Aileen L
    et al.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Tistad, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Tham, Kerstin
    von Koch, Lena
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Perceived occupational gaps one year after stroke: An explorative study2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore and describe factors associated with occupational gaps and to identify factors at 3 months that predict occupational gaps one year post-stroke. A gap, a restriction in participation, is considered to be present when there is a discrepancy between what the individual wants to do and what they actually do in everyday life. DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study. SUBJECTS: Two hundred persons with stroke. METHODS: Data from the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, one year post-stroke, was used as the dependent variable in 3- and 12-month regression analyses. Domains of the Stroke Impact Scale, global life satisfaction, demographic and medical factors were used as independent variables. RESULTS: At 3 months, activities of daily living abilities, social participation and not being born in Sweden predicted occupational gaps at 12 months. Stroke severity and not being born in Sweden and 3 factors at 12 months: social participation, self-rated recovery, and global life satisfaction were associated with occupational gaps. CONCLUSION: Activities of daily living ability at 3 months predicted occupational gaps after stroke. Thus, it is possible to identify early on, and provide interventions for, those that risk participation restrictions. Not being born in the country might be an indicator of a risk for participation restrictions.

  • 4. Chen, Eric
    et al.
    Viktorisson, Adam
    Danielsson, Anna
    Palstam, Annie
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Rehabilitation Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S
    Levels of physical activity in acute stroke patients treated at a stroke unit: A prospective, observational study.2020In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 52, no 4, article id jrm00041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: A prospective, observational study to describe levels of physical activity in patients with stroke on day 2 and day 5 or 6 after admission to a comprehensive stroke unit in Sweden.

    METHODS: The study was performed at the stroke unit at Sahlgrenska University Hospital during a period of 4 months between 2017 and 2018. Consecutive patients with stroke were observed for 1 min every 10 min while the multidisciplinary team was at work. The level of physical activity, location and the people present were noted at each time-point.

    RESULTS: A total of 46 patients were observed on day 2, of whom 29 were observed a second time on day 5 or 6. Patients were in bed half of the time and engaged in upright activity for less than 10% of day 2. Patients spent 73% of day 2 in the bedroom and 56% of this day alone. Over time, there was a significant shift of 10% from "in bed" activity to "sitting" (p §lt;0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Patients are physically inactive, alone and in their rooms for a majority of the time during the first days at a comprehensive stroke unit. There is some increase in physical activity during the first week after admission.

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  • 5. Larsson, A.
    et al.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, J.
    Lind, L.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rudholm Feldreich, Tobias
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science.
    Strong associations between plasma osteopontin and several inflammatory chemokines, cytokines and growth factors2021In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 9, no 8, article id 908Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 6. Larsson-Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Pettersson, Agneta
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Social Work. Örebro universitet.
    Team-based rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury: a qualitative synthesis of evidence of experiences of the rehabilitation process2022In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 54, article id jrm00253Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 7.
    Mantell, Andy
    et al.
    University of Chichester, West Sussex, UK.
    Simpson, Grahame
    University of Sidney, Sidney, Australia.
    Jones, Kate
    Liverpool Hospital, Sidney, Australia.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Simonson, Pattie
    Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability, London, UK.
    Vungkhanching, Martha
    California State University, Fresno, USA.
    Social Work Practice with Traumatic Brain Injury: The Results of a Structured Review2012In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 4-5, p. 459-460, article id 0313Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: opportunities and barriers from a patient perspective2016In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 30, no 5-6, p. 516-516Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acquired brain injury (ABI) is often a lifelong disability that entails a marked change in a person’s life. It involves biopsychosocial levels and return to work (RTW) is one of the main goals for the person. Several of those suffering an ABI are of working age. The society and the individuals are both winners if the person could get back to work and sustain working.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to increase knowledge about the opportunities and barriers for successful RTW among individuals with ABI.

    Methods: Adults who have ABI and had participated in work rehabilitation were interviewed in regard to their experiences of the process. The informants (five females, five males) had participated in work rehabilitation, had successfully RTW and had worked at least 50% in at least a year after the injury. The interviews were transcribed, structured and analysed by latent content analysis with a hermeneutic approach.

    Results: Three main themes that influenced RTW after ABI were identified: (i) individually adapted rehabilitation process, (ii) motivation for RTW and (iii) cognitive abilities and inabilities. The results indicate that an individually adapted vocational rehabilitation (VR) process was an important issue. The individuals with ABI actively involved in their own rehabilitation process also required continuous support from the society, the specialists, their employers and colleagues; this support has to be designed for each individual. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was necessary for the best result to RTW, in other words it was important to achieve a balance between too high and too low motivation. Finally, a comprehensive knowledge about the cognitive abilities and inabilities of the individual after ABI helped the individuals and their employers to find compensatory strategies to handle their work tasks. One implication of the findings was the necessity of a good support system and a good VR that functions well and lasts for a longer period. When there are obstacles in the VR process, it is important to have strategies and awareness of how to proceed further.

    Conclusions: Consequently, the support built for a person individually, with a balanced motivation, knowledge about the cognitive abilities and awareness of how to proceed further in the process will help to build a successful and sustainable RTW.

  • 9.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: support persons’ perception of supporting2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Successful return to work after acquired brain injury: support person’s perception of supporting2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim:

    Return to work (RTW) after acquired brain injury (ABI) is a demanding process for the client and need support. This study’s aim was to understand the support person’s perception of supporting clients with ABI to a successful RTW.

    Method:

    Nine persons who acted as support persons in the vocational rehabilitation (VR) process were chosen by clients with ABI participating in a previous study. Three of the support persons had a formal mandate to support the client by the employer and six of them were characterized as providing informal support. All the support persons had different kind of work. Semi structured interviews were conducted and analyzed by latent content analysis.

    Findings:

    The analysis elicited three themes describing the support person’s perception in the assistance for the client to successfully RTW: (i) Commitment, (ii) Adaptation and (iii) Cooperation. Within each of the theme multiple mechanisms were identified, reflecting the complexity that the VR process had for the client. The mechanisms were about strategic issues, reflection and decision making. The support persons experienced that their role was extra valuable for the client in contexts where adaptation and cooperation was required. Commitment built on social relations is linked to sustainability of the support.

    Conclusion:

    Support persons play a multi-dimensional role which is important for client with ABI to successfully RTW.

  • 11.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Change in quality of life in relation to returning to work after acquired brain injury: a population-based register study2018In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 32, no 13-14, p. 1731-1739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study investigated changes in quality of life (QoL) in relation to return to work among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).

    METHOD: The sample consisted of 1487 patients with ABI (63% men) aged 18-66 years (mean age 52) from the WebRehab Sweden national quality register database. Only patients who worked at least 50% at admission to hospital and were on full sick leave at discharge from hospital were included. QoL was measured by the EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Patients who returned to work perceived a larger improvement in QoL from discharge to follow-up one year after injury compared to patients who had not returned to work. This difference remained after adjustment for other factors associated with improved QoL, such as having a university education, increased Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale scores and getting one's driving licence reinstated.

    CONCLUSION: Return to work is an important factor for change in QoL among patients with ABI, even after adjusting for other factors related to QoL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that having employment is meaningful, increases self-esteem and fosters participation in society. Thus, helping patients with ABI return to work has a positive influence on QoL.

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  • 12.
    Matérne, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Patients experiences of opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Viktorisson, Adam
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Buvarp, Dongni
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Reinholdsson, Malin
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Palstam, Annie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Associations of Prestroke Physical Activity With Stroke Severity and Mortality After Intracerebral Hemorrhage Compared to Ischemic Stroke2022In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 99, no 19, p. e2137-e2148, article id 10.1212/WNL.0000000000201097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pre-stroke physical activity may protect the brain from severe consequences of stroke. However, prior studies on this subject included mainly ischemic stroke cases, and the association between pre-stroke physical activity and outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage is uncertain. Therefore, we sought to examine the associations between pre-stroke physical activity, stroke severity, and all-cause mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage in comparison to ischemic stroke.

    METHODS: This was a longitudinal, register-based, cohort study. All adult patients with intracerebral hemorrhage or ischemic stroke admitted to three stroke units in Gothenburg, Sweden between 1 November 2014 and 30 June 2019 were screened for inclusion. Physical activity was defined as light physical activity ≥4 h/week, or moderate physical activity ≥2 h/week the year before stroke. Stroke severity was assessed on admission using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. All-cause mortality rates were followed up to 7 years, from the time of incident stroke until death or censoring. Ordinal logit models and Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate adjusted associations of pre-stroke physical activity.

    RESULTS: We included 763 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 4225 with ischemic stroke. Pre-stroke physical activity was associated with less severe strokes by an adjusted odds ratio of 3.57 (99% CI, 2.35-5.47) for intracerebral hemorrhages and 1.92 (99% CI 1.59-2.33) for ischemic strokes. During a median follow-up of 4.7 (IQR 3.5-5.9) years, 48.5% of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage died, compared to 37.5% with ischemic stroke. Pre-stroke physical activity was associated with decreased short-term mortality (0 to 30 days) by an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.30 (99% CI 0.17-0.54) after intracerebral hemorrhage, and 0.22 (99% CI 0.13-0.37) after ischemic stroke. Pre-stroke physical activity was further associated with decreased long-term mortality (30 days to 2 years) by an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.40 (99% CI 0.21-0.77) after intracerebral hemorrhage, and 0.49 (99% CI 0.38-0.62) after ischemic stroke.

    DISCUSSION: Pre-stroke physical activity was associated with decreased stroke severity and all-cause mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke, independent of other risk factors. Based on current knowledge, health care professionals should promote physical activity as part of primary stroke prevention.

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  • 14. Viktorisson, Adam
    et al.
    Reinholdsson, Malin
    Danielsson, Anna
    Palstam, Annie
    Institute of neuroscience and physiology, Gothenburg University.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.
    Pre-stroke physical activity in relation to post-stroke outcomes - linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF): A scoping review2021In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This scoping review aims to identify how pre-stroke physical activity (PA) has been studied in relation to outcomes after stroke using the ICF framework.

    METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, and grey literature databases were systematically searched from inception to March 15, 2021, with no language restrictions. Risk of bias was evaluated for all included studies. Identified outcome measures were linked to ICF components using linking rules, and the main findings were summarized.

    RESULTS: Of 3664 records screened, 35 studies were included. The risk of bias was graded as moderate to critical for all studies. There were 60 unique outcome measures studied in relation to pre-stroke PA, covering the hyper acute to chronic phases of stroke recovery. Outcome measures linked to body functions were most common (n=19), followed by activities and participation (n=14), body structures (n=7), environmental factors (n=4) and personal factors (n=2). There were large differences in assessments of pre-stroke PA, and only one study analysed haemorrhagic cases separately.

    CONCLUSIONS: Pre-stroke PA has been studied in relation to all components in the ICF framework.  However, this review highlights the high risk of bias, heterogeneity in pre-stroke PA assessments, and the lack of information regarding haemorrhagic strokes in the current literature.

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  • 15. Westerlind, Emma
    et al.
    Persson, Hanna C
    Palstam, Annie
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Norrving, Bo
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S
    Differences in self-perceived general health, pain, and depression 1 to 5 years post-stroke related to work status at 1 year.2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 13251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stroke is one of the most common diseases and has several potential consequences, such as psychological problems and pain. Return to work (RTW) after stroke in working-age individuals is incomplete. The present study aimed to investigate differences in self-perceived general health, pain, and depression between 1 and 5 years post-stroke related to RTW status. The study was nationwide, registry-based and the study population (n = 398) consisted of working-age people who had a stroke in 2011 and participated in 1-year and 5-year follow-up questionnaire surveys. Shift analyses with the Wilcoxon signed rank test and logistic regression were used. RTW within the first year post-stroke was associated with better self-perceived general health, less pain, and less depression both at 1 and 5 years post-stroke, compared with the no-RTW group. However, the RTW group had significant deterioration in general health and pain between 1 and 5 years, while the no-RTW group had no significant change. RTW was a significant predictor of lower odds of improvement in general health and pain between 1 and 5 years. This emphasizes the need for continued follow-up and support to ensure a balance between work and health for RTW individuals after stroke.

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  • 16. Åhman, Hanna Bozkurt
    et al.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Cedervall, Ylva
    Lennhed, Björn
    Berglund, Lars
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, Lena
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Dual-task performance and neurodegeneration: Correlations between timed up-and-go dual-task test outcomes and Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers2019In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 71, no Suppl 1, p. S75-S83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tools to identify individuals at preclinical stages of dementia disorders are needed to enable early interventions. Alterations in dual-task performance have been detected early in progressive neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, dual-task testing may have the potential to screen for cognitive impairment caused by neurodegeneration. Exploring correlations between dual-task performance and biomarkers of neurodegeneration is therefore of interest.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate correlations between Timed Up-and-Go dual-task (TUGdt) outcomes and Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau).

    METHODS: This cross-sectional cohort study included 90 participants (age range 49-84 years) undergoing memory assessment, who were subsequently diagnosed with AD, other dementia disorders, mild cognitive impairment, or subjective cognitive impairment. TUG combined with "Naming Animals" (TUGdt NA) and "Months Backwards" (TUGdt MB), respectively, were used to assess dual-task performance. The number of correct words and time taken to complete the tests were measured. The CSF biomarkers were analysed by ELISA. Spearman's rank correlation was used for analyses between TUGdt outcomes (TUGdt NA and TUGdt MB), and CSF biomarkers, adjusted for age, gender, and educational level.

    RESULTS: The number of correct words, as well as the number of correct words/10 s during TUGdt NA correlated negatively to CSF t-tau and p-tau. No correlations were found between any time scores and CSF biomarkers.

    CONCLUSION: The correlations between TUGdt NA and t-tau and p-tau may indicate that neurodegeneration affects dual-task performance. Longitudinal studies are needed to further explore dual-task testing in screening for cognitive impairment due to neurodegeneration.

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