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  • 1.
    Ahlsén Gahns, Malin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Olsson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Current and future shopping conditions in Sälen2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Going from having bought the most essential at the small shops close to home, better communications and an increasingly consumption oriented lifestyle has created a change in shopping behavior and has led to phenomenon such as shopping centres and more. These are constantly being built in Sweden: in the cities, outside the cities and more recently even in small cities -small cities as for one reason or another have access to a larger customer base which can have businesses to flourish economically.

    During the first decade of the 21st century, shopping centres have been established along the Swedish/Norwegian border. Since the Norwegian Krone is much stronger than the Swedish Krona Norwegians save a great deal of money on going to Sweden to shop. During the shopping trips to Sweden, it is mostly alcohol, meat, tobacco and candy that are being bought. However, other products such as clothing, technology, household appliances and more are also being purchased, all to save money on the trip. Together these cross border shoppers spent 11, 6 billion in Sweden during the year of 2010. This gives an average spending of approximately 10 900 SEK per cross border shopper on annual basis.

    Nordby, Töcksfors and Charlottenberg (small cities located in southwestern Sweden) are places characterized by Norwegian cross border shopping. Together, they generate billions every year and this only seems to increase. These places are relatively small in size but have prominent attributes such as proximity to the Norwegian border. Apart from these resorts and shopping centres, there are few or none similar places near the Norwegian border in the rest of Sweden. However, a place which is geographically well located and has a relatively large Norwegian and Swedish customer base is the ski resort of Sälen in west central of Sweden.

    Sälen is a village located near the Norwegian border, although fairly sparsely populated. The destination has annually about one million official guest nights, based on the 414 000 visitors who stay an average of about 4, 5 days.  Per visit, these tourists individually spend an average of 862 SEK on shopping at the destination.

    The expenditure of the mountain tourists together with the Norwegian border shoppers makes it very interesting to explore the opportunities for shopping development in terms of a shopping centre in the region of Sälen.

  • 2.
    Al Masharqah, Tareq
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Political Unrest and its effects in the destination image of Egyptian tourism product2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Möller, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Westholm, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Dör byn när lanthandeln stänger?2011In: Plan, ISSN 0032-0560, no 3, 20-23 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4. Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Westholm, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Understanding Rural Change: Demography as a key to the future2007In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 39, no 4, 363-379 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades have seen a rapidly growing interest in foresight methodology. Methods have been developed in corporate and governmental communication exercises often labelled technology foresight. In reality, these foresights have often drifted into processes of social change, since technological change is hard to foresee beyond what is already in the pipe-line. Forecasting of social change, however, must be based on solid knowledge about the mechanisms of continuity and change. Virtually nothing can be said about the future without relating to the past; foresights and futures studies are about revealing the hidden pulse of history. Hence, the answer to forecasting the future is empirical research within the social sciences. Demographic change has been recognised as a key determinant for explaining social change. Population changes are fairly predictable and the age transition can explain a wide range of socio-economic changes. For rural futures, demographic change is a key issue, since age structure in rural areas is often uneven and also unstable due to migration patterns. A number of policy related questions as well as research challenges are raised as a consequence.

  • 5. Beland Lindahl, K
    et al.
    Westholm, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Global trends affecting future Swedish forest use – outlook among key actors2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bohlin, Magnus
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Kulturlandskapet som råvara i turismens upplevelseindustri2009In: Astrid Lindgrens landskap : hur landskapets kulturarv förändras, förstås, förvaltas och förmedlas / [ed] Bohlin, Magnus, Vimmerby, 2009, Vol. 69, 143-154 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bohlin, Magnus
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Brandt, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Creating Tourist experiences by interpreting places using GPS and multimedia technologies2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bohlin, Magnus
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Brandt, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Elbe, Jörgen
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management.
    Tourism as a vehicle for regional development in peripheral areas – myth or reality?: A longitudinal case study of Swedish regions2016In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 24, no 10, 1788-1805 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the contemporary so-called ‘competition state era’, many rural and peripheral regions are in decline. Tourism is increasingly viewed as being able to alleviate and rejuvenate regions that are facing economic difficulties. The European Union has launched several programmes with the goal of stimulating growth and employment in peripheral areas. These programmes are often used to support tourism development projects. In this paper, a longitudinal analysis of spatial changes in Swedish tourism is conducted. The analysis is based on statistics regarding overnight stays in Swedish commercial accommodation facilities. The aim is to investigate if tourism and tourism policy contribute to the reduction in disparities between regions. Although there are exceptions, the main findings indicate that the potential for creating sustainable rural tourism growth through tourism policy seems to be much less than the popular discourse suggests. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 9.
    Bohlin, Magnus
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Underlag för gränshandel och köpcentrum i Sälen2011Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    A comparison and contrast of the montage of motives among social and lifestyle entrepreneurs2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    An investigation of the associated benefits from prioritizing the people through the Fair Hotels Scheme in Ireland2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Fair trade tourism South Africa: a pragmatic poverty reduction mechanism2011In: Tourism Planning and Development, ISSN 2156-8324, Vol. 8, no 3, 237-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental premise of social entrepreneurship is to use business knowledge to solve critical economic, social and environmental dilemmas facing a society. Social entrepreneurship is an emerging theme of inquiry in contemporary business, entrepreneurship, marketing and ethics literature. In effect, social entrepreneurs are concerned with making a “mission-related impact” which becomes their central concern. To date, there has been little attention given to the notion of social entrepreneurship in the discipline of tourism. Despite the lack of attention in tourism research there have been a number of significant social entrepreneurial contributions made to various communities in South Africa. Such contributions demonstrate the significance of change makers in the context of rural South Africa signifying progress in the country's new democracy. This paper is a consequence of two phases of field work in South Africa over a 10- month period. The paper discusses the motivational behaviour of six Fair Trade Tourism South Africa (FTTSA) entrepreneurs who have developed businesses with the intention of giving back to their South African communities. However, the study employed critical discourse analysis and in so doing it recognizes some of the inherent contradictions in informants' discourses based on their white privilege experienced during apartheid. Two aims focused on this exploration: 1) to seek information regarding entrepreneurial stimuli for involvement in social action, through FTTSA membership, and 2) to investigate FTTSA members' micro and macro discourses that inform their actions and behaviours.

  • 13.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Fair trade tourism South Africa: consumer virtue or moral selving2011In: Journal of Ecotourism, ISSN 1472-4049, E-ISSN 1747-7638, Vol. 10, no 3, 235-249 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The academic focus on tourism impacts has raised questions regarding stakeholder responsibility. From a consumption perspective, many ethical consumers, by enacting their political and moral concerns through their consumer choice demonstrate their virtuous qualities and at the same time construct themselves as ethical. Ethical consumption and the consumption of Fairtrade, Fair Trade Tourism and Fair Trade Tourism South Africa (FTTSA) – which derived from Pro-Poor Tourism and ecotourism principles –, are embedded into a cultural context of global consumer capitalism. This macro discourse informs the way people think about the extent of their responsibility, what constitutes a fair exchange, and how they construct themselves as ethical consumers. Ethical consumption, although virtuous can then be described as a form of conspicuous consumption because consumption in its self is a hedonistic act especially when one uses ethical consumption as a mechanism to demonstrate one's ‘ethical self’. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with eleven FTTSA travellers in December–February of 2009 at two FTTSA businesses. The paper employed Critical Discourse Analysis to explore some of the tensions between consumer virtue and the hedonistic behaviours of the informants. The aim of this paper is to investigate the notion of moral selving in the context of ethical travel and in particular FTTSA. Results revealed that motivations for participation in ethical consumption and travel are varied and sometimes influenced by the appeal of moral selving.

  • 14.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    In consideration of a new approach to tourism: a critical review of fair trade tourism2011In: Journal of Tourism and Peace Research, ISSN 1878-7754, Vol. 1, no 2, 27-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism research has highlighted the negative consequences brought on by tourism development. As a way to address such impacts a proliferation of alternative approaches have emerged in the discourse projecting alternative ways to conduct and participate in tourism which provide greater benefits. A by-product of ecotourism and the Pro-Poor Tourism approach has applied fair trade principles to tourism. The aim of this paper is to explore the development and application of fair trade principles to the tourism industry by reviewing secondary data. The key research questions that this paper addresses are: What has been the impetus to identify and apply fair trade principles in the context of the tourism industry? What countries have gotten involved in Fair Trade Tourism? What are some of the implications, issues and concerns regarding the implementation of Fair Trade Tourism? The critical review of the Fair Trade Tourism concept identifies that tourism practitioners, academics and tourists must pause to reflect on this approach as a way to strive for better treatment of people and a way to eradicate poverty. As such, the author raises a number of key concerns regarding the rhetoric of fair trade and its various meanings, the implementation of fair trade as a poverty eradication mechanism, its context and effect.

  • 15.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Revealing the discourses: white entrepreneurial motivation in black South Africa2011In: Tourism Planning and Development, ISSN 2156-8324, Vol. 8, no 2, 199-213 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental premise of social entrepreneurship is to use business knowledge to solve critical economic, social and environmental dilemmas facing a society. Social entrepreneurship is an emerging theme of inquiry in contemporary business, entrepreneurship, marketing and ethics literature. In effect, social entrepreneurs are concerned with making a “mission-related impact” which becomes their central concern. To date, there has been little attention given to the notion of social entrepreneurship in the discipline of tourism. Despite the lack of attention in tourism research there have been a number of significant social entrepreneurial contributions made to various communities in South Africa. Such contributions demonstrate the significance of change makers in the context of rural South Africa signifying progress in the country's new democracy. This paper is a consequence of two phases of field work in South Africa over a 10- month period. The paper discusses the motivational behaviour of six Fair Trade Tourism South Africa (FTTSA) entrepreneurs who have developed businesses with the intention of giving back to their South African communities. However, the study employed critical discourse analysis and in so doing it recognizes some of the inherent contradictions in informants' discourses based on their white privilege experienced during apartheid. Two aims focused on this exploration: 1) to seek information regarding entrepreneurial stimuli for involvement in social action, through FTTSA membership, and 2) to investigate FTTSA members' micro and macro discourses that inform their actions and behaviours.

  • 16.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Using CSR as a tool for development: an investigation of the Fair Hotels Scheme in Ireland2013In: Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism, ISSN 1528-008X, E-ISSN 1528-0098, Vol. 14, no 1, 49-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores an opportunity for the accommodation sector in Ireland to engage in Corporate Social Responsibility. The aim of this article is to investigate the Fair Hotels Ireland scheme and explore its potential to create social cohesion which may then influence the economic and social progress in both theory and praxis. The research question that supports the aim of this study is: has the Fair Hotels Ireland scheme created value and influenced consumer purchasing? To respond to this research question ten interviews were carried out with Fair Hotel managers in Ireland. A content analysis was used to examine the data. The results indicated that hotel managers noticed an increase in business as a consequence of their CSR and becoming a Fair Hotel; and the scheme was described as creating value for their hotel and staff. However, the managers had not noticed a significant difference in the level of employee satisfaction. © 2013 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 17.
    Boluk, Karla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Pashkevich, Albina
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography. Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Tourism Studies.
    Exploring the discourses used to sell heritage in Sweden2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage tourism is a form of niche tourism which has emerged as an alternative to mass tourism. However the discourses used to market some heritage products generally appeal to an elite group in society who are demanding. Thus heritage tourism is marketed and packaged in a way to appeal to an exclusive group who are interested in tailor-made products that provide some entertainment value. The aim of this paper is to investigate the marketing strategies and goals for tourism development, from the perspective of two World Heritage Sites (WHS) in Sweden including the Great Copper Mountain in Falun and the Old Church Town in Luleå. Accordingly, the discourses used to sell heritage in the context of Sweden are discussed. A mixed-methods approach was used by the authors to carry out this investigation. The results of the analysis revealed that the heritage presented in the two cases are marketed as exclusive and as such, preclude the participation of some individuals. Furthermore, it was established that enhanced communication between WHS products and Sweden and other tourism products would improve visitation.

  • 18. Book, Tommy
    et al.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalens högskola, Institutionen för samhälls- och beteendevetenskap.
    Ghettot som geografisk, historisk och sociologisk företeelse2004Book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Fransson, Urban
    Institutet för byggforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Tollefsen, Aina
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Att flytta till glesbygden1993Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Population and Housing Dynamics in a Metropolitan Region: The case of Stockholm1998Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Population Concentration and Dispersion in Sweden since the 1970s1997In: Population planning and policies / [ed] Borgegård, L-E., Findlay, A.M., Sondell, E., Umeå: Umeå Universitet , 1997Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Spridning och koncentration av befolkningen i Sveriges kommuner 1973-19921995In: Då, Nu och sedan: Geografiska uppsatser till minnet av Ingvar Jonsson / [ed] Ian Layton, Umeå: Umeå Universitet , 1995, 127-141 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Where is Sweden multi-Ethnic?: The geographical distribution of immigrants on municipality level 1960-19951998In: International conference  Housing in transition, Piran, Slovenia, Conference proceedings, 1998, 476-491 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Population redistribution in Sweden: long term trends and contemporary tendencies1995In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 77, no 1, 31-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Müller, Dieter
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Concentration and Dispersion of Immigrants in Sweden, 1973-19921998In: The Canadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien, ISSN 0008-3658, E-ISSN 1541-0064, Vol. 44, no 1, 28-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Borgegård, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Institutet för bostadsforskning (IBF).
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Müller, Dieter
    Umeå universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Hur förändras bosättningsmönstret när invandrarna blir fler?1995In: Invandrare & Minoriteter, no 5, 29-33 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Brandt, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Turism och mobila informationssystem2009In: Astrid Lindgrens landskap : hur landskapets kulturarv förändras, förstås, förvaltas och förmedlas / [ed] Bohlin, Magnus, Vimmerby, 2009, Vol. 69, 113-126 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Brandt, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Wage determinants in the Swedish tourism sector 2002-20112015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Brandt, Daniel
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Wikström, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.
    Education and careers in the Swedish tourism sector: How important is education for building a successful career?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Berättelsedestinationer: Från Astrid Lindgrens ideallandskap till vandringar i deckarförfattarnas fotspår2009In: Astrid Lindgrens landskap : hur landskapets kulturarv förändras, förstås, förvaltas och förmedlas / [ed] Bohlin, Magnus, Vimmerby, 2009, Vol. 69, 101-112 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Carling, Kenneth
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.
    Han, Mengjie
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems. Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Var ska sjukhusen ligga?2013In: Ekonomiska samfundets tidskrift, ISSN 0013-3183, E-ISSN 2323-1378, no 3, 165-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna artikel visar på en metod för att undersöka hur optimal befolkningens fysiska tillgänglighet till sjukvården är. Detta är relevant med tanke på den svenska storregionala omdaningen som säkerligen kommer provocera fram omprövningar av sjukhusens framtida placering.

    Med Dalarna som exempel fann vi att en ökning från dagens två till tre optimalt lokaliserade sjukhus skulle minska befolkningens genomsnittliga reseavstånd med 25 %.

    På basis av transportsektorns standardkalkyler för samhällsekonomisk effekter vid resande, samt av kostnader för drift av sjukvård sluter vi dessutom oss till att en komplettering av nuvarande två sjukhus i Dalarna med ett tredje vore samhällsekonomiskt effektivt.

  • 32.
    Cohen, Scott A
    et al.
    School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Faculty of Business, Economics and Law , University of Surrey, UK.
    Duncan, Tara
    Department of Tourism , University of Otago , Dunedin , New Zealand.
    Thulemark, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Lifestyle Mobilities: The Crossroads of Travel, Leisure and Migration2015In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 10, no 1, 155-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the mobilities paradigm intersects with physically moving as an ongoing lifestyle choice. We conceptualise a lens of ‘lifestyle mobilities’ that challenges discrete notions of and allows for a wider grasp of the increasing fluidity between travel, leisure and migration. We demonstrate how contemporary lifestyle-led mobility patterns contribute to and illustrate a breakdown in conventional binary divides between work and leisure, and a destabilisation of concepts of ‘home’ and ‘away’. We unpack issues of identity construction, belonging and place attachment associated with sustained corporeal mobility, and conclude by suggesting avenues for the further study of lifestyle mobilities.

  • 33. Cohen, Scott
    et al.
    Thulemark, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Duncan, Tara
    Conceptualising Lifestyle Mobilities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being corporeally mobile as a lifestyle is now influenced by and through transnational ties, technologies of transport, knowledge and information, and changing socio-cultural outlooks that often characterise the (re)formation of the everyday. As such, moving as and for lifestyle has become increasingly complex. We offer the term 'lifestyle mobilities' as a conceptual lens to challenge current thinking on the intersections between tourism and migration. Contemporary research on lifestyle migration largely addresses permanent and seasonal lifestyle relocation, which fails to grasp temporal complexities and ambiguities that are found in various experiences of lifestyle mobilities. Using the mobilities paradigm, we conceptually explore some of the ways in which lifestyle mobilities are subsuming binaries of work/leisure, home/away and here/there. We discuss how experiences of corporeal movement as lifestyle produce, and are produced by, multiple identities and cultural hybridities that are affecting how some individuals may (dis)connect with place.

  • 34. Cohen, Scott
    et al.
    Thulemark, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Duncan, Tara
    Lifestyle Mobilities: A conceptual focus2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that mobilities is a key concept of contemporary society and the predominant way in which one engages with the world. At the same time, there has been a (re)focus on ideas of lifestyle within the social sciences. Consequently, there is a need to challenge current thinking about the corporeal organisation of movement to take into account the ambiguities and tensions that abound in the literature on both lifestyle and mobilities. This session seeks papers that highlight socio-cultural phenomena pertaining to lifestyle and mobility and invites papers that challenge existing thinking in these areas, including: - Negotiations of lifestyle and movement - Mobile methodologies - Affective possibilities and lifestyle - Mobility, lifestyle and tourism, recreation and/or leisure - Hybrid possibilities – migration/transnationalism/mobility - Cosmopolitanism, fluid identities and identity confusions - Moorings, movement and performance - Mobilities as the corporeal everyday - Lifestyle mobility and relationships to place

  • 35.
    de Bernardi, Cecilia
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Tourism Studies. Multidimensional Tourism Institute - University of Lapland.
    Destination competitiveness, the environment and sustainability challenges and cases2017In: Anatolia: An International Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Research, ISSN 1303-2917, E-ISSN 1300-4220, Vol. 28, no 2, 296-298 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 36.
    de Bernardi, Cecilia
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Tourism Studies. Multidimensional Tourism Institute - University of Lapland.
    Sámi Indigenous Tourism Empowerment in the Nordic Countries through Labelling Systems: Strengthening Ethnic Enterprises and Activities2017In: Tourism and Ethnodevelopment: Inclusion, Empowerment and Self-determination / [ed] Ismar Borges de Lima, Victor T. King, Routledge, 2017, 200-212 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    de Bernardi, Cecilia
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Tourism Studies. Multidimensional Tourism Institute - University of Lapland.
    Tourism, Public Transport and Sustainable Mobility, C. Michael Hall, Diem-Trinh Le-Klähn, Yael Ram, Channel View Publications, Bristol/Blue Ridge Summit (2017), xv +2017In: Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, ISSN 1447-6770Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 38. de la Barre, Suzanne
    et al.
    Maher, Patrick
    Dawson, Jackie
    Hillmer-Pegram, Kevin
    Huijbens, Edwards
    Lamers, Machiel
    Liggett, Daniela
    Müller, Dieter
    Pashkevich, Albina
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Stewart, Emma
    Tourism and arctic observation systems: Exploring the relationships2016In: Polar Research, ISSN 0800-0395, E-ISSN 1751-8369, Vol. 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic is affected by global environmental change and also by diverse interests from many economic sectors and industries. Over the last decade, various actors have attempted to explore the options for setting up integrated and comprehensive trans-boundary systems for monitoring and observing these impacts. These Arctic Observation Systems (AOS) contribute to the planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of environmental change and responsible social and economic development in the Arctic. The aim of this article is to identify the two-way relationship between AOS and tourism. On the one hand, tourism activities account for diverse changes across a broad spectrum of impact fields. On the other hand, due to its multiple and diverse agents and far-reaching activities, tourism is also well-positioned to collect observational data and participate as an actor in monitoring activities. To accomplish our goals, we provide an inventory of tourism-embedded issues and concerns of interest to AOS from a range of destinations in the circumpolar Arctic region, including Alaska, Arctic Canada, Iceland, Svalbard, the mainland European Arctic and Russia. The article also draws comparisons with the situation in Antarctica. On the basis of a collective analysis provided by members of the International Polar Tourism Research Network from across the polar regions, we conclude that the potential role for tourism in the development and implementation of AOS is significant and has been overlooked.

  • 39.
    Duncan, Tara
    et al.
    Department of Tourism, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Cohen, Scott A
    School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Faculty of Business, Economics and Law, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
    Thulemark, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Lifestyle mobilities: Intersections of Travel, Leisure and Migration2014Book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Engström, Christina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Boluk, Karla
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    The battlefield of the mountain: exploring the conflict of tourism development on the Three Peaks in Idre, Sweden2012In: Tourism planning & development, ISSN 2156-8316, Vol. 9, no 4, 411-427 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the conflict between a Swedish Sami community and a local tourism company eager to exploit traditional Sami land. The aim of the paper is to illustrate the Sami approach and how they negotiated during a conflict concerning the planning process of a large scale tourism development. Three research questions frame the study. How did the stakeholders involved in the conflict communicate and mediate? How were the various objectives prioritized? What is the major contribution this conflict can offer future conflicts? Published text was analysed as a way to map out the conflict and demonstrate how such conflicts are currently managed. Specifically, newspaper articles, letters to editors and authoritative documents were reviewed. A text analysis was employed to scrutinize the published text. Furthermore, the researchers carried out a critical discourse analysis for the purpose of analysing the published and empirical data. Key findings of this study indicate that there is a strong hierarchal order among the different interests of land use. Furthermore, traditional claims to the land are not always considered as superior to economically driven plans. Instead, objectives consolidated by the state government are an important factor in such types of conflicts.

  • 41.
    Engström, Daniel
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Leffler, Frida
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Perceptions of climate change at ski resorts in midsouth of Sweden2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change as a phenomenon will imply new risks for the ski industry. Intergovernmental Panal on Climate Change presents three future scenarios, during the periods between 1990-2100, in forms of increased temperatures, a rise in the sea level and seasonal variations, variables out of which two have direct impacts on the ski industry. The aim for this study was to explore and compare attitudes towards climate change between five ski resorts located in mid-south of Sweden. This was done through in depth interviews in both face to face and by telephone. The result of the study was that all the chosen ski resorts were aware of climate change as a phenomenon but have not yet recognized its consequences. All ski resorts use methods to maintain skiing i.e. artificial snow production though not because of climate change.

  • 42.
    Gradén, Mattias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Energy Technology. Uppsala universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Storskalig vindkraft i skogen: Om rationell planering och lokalt motstånd2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The global climate threat has intensified Sweden’s ambitions to build wind power stations. This thesis explores the planning of, and opposition to, wind power in the inland rural and forest regions of Sweden. It is in these autonomous communities that the plans are implemented and the aim of the thesis was to, from a local perspective, understand and analyse the planning and acceptance challenges that large-scale wind power development faces in places that are both sparsely populated and have good wind conditions.

    This thesis is based on qualitative methods and was conducted as two studies. The case study area comprises four municipalities in Dalarna County. The first study analyses the planning and establishment process in three municipalities using interviews and an analysis method called process tracing. The second study analyses one wind power establishment, in which the interviews form the basis for a discourse analytical approach.

    One striking finding highlights the relationship between the global and the local. Global environment and energy aspects are absent in the local process, and wind power becomes a technical land issue that clashes with other local land interests. Another finding of the study reveals that planning for wind power establishment follows a rational planning tradition. The feelings and memories of the individual – different views regarding the landscape – play a background role in the formal permit process, while measurable observable conditions have a more prominent role. Wind power developers thereby acquire a more significant position than what they probably would have had if the planning had included local residents’ views on wind power in the landscape at an early stage.

  • 43.
    Gradén, Mattias
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Vindkraft i Dalarna: Från acceptans och lokalisering till planering och eftertanke2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines prerequisites for wind power diffusion in a county in Sweden that quite recently was concidered to be of interest for electricty production from renewable energy sources. Three different municipalities: Falun, Mora and Orsa in the county of Dalarna are highlighted.  Their view on permitting processes of wind power installations are investigated. Other actors, such as exploiters and local citizens are also being analysed.

    This study shows that the local acceptance was very high when the first wind power parks were built, much thanks to local politicians and local citizens. For the politicians the wind power symbolised a key to a better green society, for the local citizens the wind power meant some economical advantages. The first wind power parks were localised to areas because of good wind conditions and social factors, especially from local communities. However, results from this study shows that the acceptance for wind power the last few years, in generel, has decreased.  The local authorities have also been conscious of some negative consequenses from already built wind power parks.  As a response they started to add planning tools to the permitting process.

  • 44.
    Han, Mengjie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Rebreyend, Pascal
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering.
    How does the use of different road networks effect the optimal location of facilities in rural areas?2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The p-median problem is often used to locate P service facilities in a geographically distributed population. Important for the performance of such a model is the distance measure.

    Distance measure can vary if the accuracy of the road network varies. The rst aim in this study is to analyze how the optimal location solutions vary, using the p-median model, when the road network is alternated. It is hard to nd an exact optimal solution for p-median problems. Therefore, in this study two heuristic solutions are applied, simulating annealing and a classic heuristic. The secondary aim is to compare the optimal location solutions using dierent algorithms for large p-median problem. The investigation is conducted by the means of a case study in a rural region with an asymmetrically distributed population, Dalecarlia.

    The study shows that the use of more accurate road networks gives better solutions for optimal location, regardless what algorithm that is used and regardless how many service facilities that is optimized for. It is also shown that the simulated annealing algorithm not just is much faster than the classic heuristic used here, but also in most cases gives better location solutions.

  • 45.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Trying to be Attractive: Image Building and Identity Formation in Small Industrial Municipalities in Sweden2008In: Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, ISSN 1751-8040, Vol. 4, no 2, 102-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efforts of creating and communicating positive images constitute a considerable part of contemporary regional development strategies. The use of different marketing practices has become a popular way to promote attractiveness for tourists, business and in-migrants in growth regions as well as in peripheral and economically vulnerable regions across Europe. In this article I explore the employment of different place marketing strategies as a development tool in specific local contexts. The study aims at understanding the role of place marketing in the process of image building in municipalities with experiences of negative economic development and unfavourable images. The empirical material used consists of a case study with six small industrial municipalities in the Swedish Bergslagen region. Strategies of image building are described and analysed by using a conceptual model of different cultural economy approaches to development. The case study indicates that place marketing in a broader sense should not only be looked upon as a matter of selling the municipality to outsiders such as tourists and potential in-migrants. In some types of municipalities, place marketing efforts are rather a matter of adding new aspects to, or entirely changing the place brand. An important target group is in this case the inhabitants of the region. By selling itself to ‘insiders’ the municipalities are trying to create a discourse of attractiveness.

  • 46.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Hay Walters, Nicole
    School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Business and Management,.
    Still a white paradise?: Photographic representations of Jamaica as a tourism destination2016In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 16, no 1/2, 59-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual images, from travel brochures and television commercials to internet advertisements, represent a powerful element of tourist destination marketing. This article seeks to understand how destination marketing represents people and places through visual images while examining the role of tourism discourse in the construction of cultural meanings and identity. Using Jamaica as a case study, the researchers explore the issue of contemporary touristic images. A combination of content and discourse analysis was used to examine images included in printed marketing materials and on the DMO’s website drawing upon postcolonial theory as a critical and contextual perspective that provides an interpretation of the meanings that are conveyed by these representations. The main findings indicate that decades after the end of colonialism in Jamaica, marketers perpetuate the presentation of paradisal destination images using visual representations. It is argued that colonial tropes and practices of “Othering” remain fundamental to the meaning and rationale of seeing Jamaica and the travel experience. However, this study also identified strategies that could be further explored in an effort to counteract colonial discourse, as the use of culture and local folkways opens up avenues for the (re)evaluation and (re)representation of Jamaica and the holiday experience

  • 47.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Isacsson, Gunnar
    Regionförstoring och regionförminskning?: Individers räckhåll – platsbundenhet, rörlighet och kön2010In: Rörlighet, pendling och regionförstoring för bättre kompetensförsörjning, sysselsättning och hållbar tillväxt: Resultatredovisningar från 15 FoU-projekt inom VINNOVAs DYNAMO-program, Stockholm, 2010, 20-25 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Macuchova, Zuzana
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Economics.
    Rydell, Alexis
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Willingness to commute long distance among job seekers in Dalarna, Sweden2013In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, Vol. 28, 49-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies on commuting behavior and willingness towards commuting have analyzed individuals who are active in the workforce and have largely focused on larger metropolitan regions. This paper presents results from a survey of unemployed job seekers in the county of Dalarna, Sweden and analyzes the differences in willingness towards long-distance commuting between individuals with different socio-economic situations and experiences of unemployment. The analysis is conducted through a linear probability model complemented with a logistic regression model. Conclusions are drawn on the socio-economic factors that influence the probability of an individual’s willingness to commute longer than 40 minutes. The analysis also takes interaction between different factors into account. The study concludes that the factors influencing the willingness to commute are gender, level of education, and the presence of children in the household. Furthermore, the interactions between age and length of unemployment, age and educational level, and age and gender are shown to be significant in the willingness to commute long distances.

  • 49.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Maureira, Teresa
    Uppsala Universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Performing identity and culture in Indigenous tourism: a study of Indigenous communities in Québec, Canada2015In: Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change, ISSN 1476-6825, E-ISSN 1747-7654, Vol. 30, no 12, 1-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the ways in which Indigenous tourism affects representations of identity and culture, and how tourism practices are described, negotiated and related to development in Indigenous communities. This aim is met through a study, including interviews and observations in Québec, Canada, where Indigenous tourism has received increased attention and economic importance in recent years. Tourism is put forward as positive for economic as well as social and cultural development, through alternative income opportunities and the revalorization of traditions and cultural practices. Individuals from four different ethnic nations were involved in the study: Innu (formerly known as Montagnais), Cree (Eeyou), Wôbanaki (Abénakis) and Hurons (Wendat). From the interviews conducted for this study, we find that Indigenous tourism influences the ways in which individuals see themselves, and how they perceive their identity and culture. Through the production of Indigenous tourism products, the notion of authenticity is challenged, and performed in ways that benefit contemporary life within the communities. But these performances may also reproduce or challenge traditional Indigenous identities, and fuel tensions and conflicts between different groups within the communities.

  • 50.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Pashkevich, Albina
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Heritage tourism and inherited institutional structures: the case of Falun Great Copper Mountain2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 11, no 1, 54-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the local resource that a mine represents and analyses the role of stakeholders and institutions during the development of heritage tourism. The paper aims to examine the role of stakeholders and their interpretation of heritage in the management process in the case of the Great Copper Mountain World Heritage Site in Falun, Sweden. The paper focuses on local strategies for developing heritage tourism in which concepts of institutions and path dependency in terms of inherited social and economic structures can shed light on more general local development processes. The empirical material consists of interviews, official documents and marketing material. While the goal of many of the interviewed stakeholders is to promote tourism development, a common view is often lacking in terms of what the tourist product is or how the role of the World Heritage Site can be interpreted with regard to tourism activities. There are also sceptical voices regarding the development of activities and attractions devoted to entertainment without educational purposes. The marketing texts focus on the landscape and the 17th century system of production, which further supports the view that the preservation of the remnants from this period will be prioritised in contemporary management policies. The present paper interprets this concept as an indication of the strength of the institutions and ideas that promote the importance of education and historical facts related to mining communicated by former mining-related stakeholders as well as by heritage organisations, including UNESCO.

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