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  • 1.
    Aalto-Hardy, Annette
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, French.
    Les influences françaises dans la Russie tsariste: sur les réformes culturelles, sociales et politiques2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [fr]

    Le mémoire traite de l’influence des idées françaises des Lumières sur la Russie et son évolution, notamment sociale, politique et culturelle. Cette étude est concentrée sur les deux tsars les plus célèbres et leur règne respectifs, Pierre Ier le Grand et Catherine II la Grande puisqu’ils ont été à l’origine de la plupart des réformes. Une description de la Russie avant l'époque de Pierre Ier et du siècle des Lumières, ses philosophes et ses idées fondamentales, est aussi présentée. Le mémoire se termine par une brève discussion sur les réformes essentielles faites dans la Russie tsariste.

  • 2.
    Abdul Kareem, Ala'a
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Comparative Literature.
    A Psychoanalytical Reading of Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights: An Analysis of the Defense Mechanisms of Some Characters2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay presents a portrayal of Heathcliff, Catherine and Isabella from a psychoanalytical perspective with regard to four defense mechanisms; namely, repression, denial, sublimation and projection in order to see how these defense mechanisms have affected the characters’ decisions and behaviour, and led them to their destinations in life. It will include three major sections: repression in characters, denial in characters, and sublimation and projection in characters. These terms will be more clearly defined and explained in the subsequent sections.

  • 3.
    Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorén, Bosse
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    The Perceptual Weight of Word Stress, Quantity and Tonal Word Accent in Swedish2017In: Phonology in Protolanguage and Interlanguage / [ed] Elena Babatsouli and David Ingram, Equinox Publishing, 2017, 316-341 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When teaching the pronunciation of an additional language, the teacher should know which properties to give high priority and which to give lower priority. The present study aims at ranking the perceptual weight among the three phonemic prosodic contrasts of Swedish, namely word stress, quantity and tonal word accent. In two experiments, native Swedish subjects were presented with several disyllabic sequences; intact words, nonsense words and words that were distorted with respect to the three prosodic contrasts. The distorted words were not members of minimal pairs. In addition to intact words and non-word distractors, subjects heard originally trochaic words pronounced with iambic stress pattern and vice versa, originally /VːC/ words pronounced as /VCː/ and originally accent I words pronounced with accent II and vice versa. Listeners should decide whether the words were real words or not. The result shows that words with changed word accent category were rather easy to identify, words with changed stress pattern harder to identify, and changed quantity category caused most problems.

  • 4.
    Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorén, Bosse
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    The relative perceptual weight of two Swedish prosodic contrasts2015In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech 2015 / [ed] Elena Babatsouli, David Ingram, Chania 73100, Greece: Institute of Monolingual and Bilingual Speech , 2015, 1-7 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. In addition to 9 vowel and 18 consonant phonemes, Swedish has three prosodic phonemic contrasts: word stress, quantity and tonal word accent. There are also examples of distinctive phrase or sentence stress, where a verb can be followed by either an unstressed preposition or a stressed particle. This study focuses on word level and more specifically on word stress and tonal word accent in disyllabic words. When making curriculums for second language learners, teachers are helped by knowing which phonetic or phonological features are more or less crucial for the intelligibility of speech and there are some structural and anecdotal evidence that word stress should play a more important role for intelligibility of Swedish, than the tonal word accent. The Swedish word stress is about prominence contrasts between syllables, mainly signaled by syllable duration, while the tonal word accent is signaled mainly by pitch contour. The word stress contrast, as in armen [´arːmən] ‘the arm’ - armén [ar´meːn] ‘the army’, the first word trochaic and the second iambic, is present in all regional varieties of Swedish, and realized with roughly the same acoustic cues, while the tonal word accent, as in anden [´anːdən] ‘the duck’ - anden [`anːdən] ‘the spirit’ is absent in some dialects (as well as in singing), and also signaled with a variety of tonal patterns depending on region. The present study aims at comparing the respective perceptual weight of the two mentioned contrasts. Two lexical decision tests were carried out where in total 34 native Swedish listeners should decide whether a stimulus was a real word or a non-word. Real words of all mentioned categories were mixed with nonsense words and words that were mispronounced with opposite stress pattern or opposite tonal word accent category. The results show that distorted word stress caused more non-word judgments and more loss, than distorted word accent. Our conclusion is that intelligibility of Swedish is more sensitive to distorted word stress pattern than to distorted tonal word accent pattern. This is in compliance with the structural arguments presented above, and also with our own intuition.

  • 5.
    Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorén, Bosse
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    What affects recognition most – wrong wordstress or wrong word accent?2015In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2015, Lund University, Sweden / [ed] Malin Svensson Lundmark, Gilbert Ambrazaitis and Joost van de Weijer, 2015, Vol. 55, 7-10 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to find out which of the two Swedish prosodic contrasts of 1) wordstress pattern and 2) tonal word accent category has the greatest communicative weight, a lexical decision experiment was conducted: in one part word stress pattern was changed from trochaic to iambic, and in the other part trochaic accentII words were changed to accent I.Native Swedish listeners were asked to decide whether the distorted words werereal words or ‘non-words’. A clear tendency is that listeners preferred to give more‘non-word’ responses when the stress pattern was shifted, compared to when wordaccent category was shifted. This could have implications for priority of phonological features when teaching Swedish as a second language.

  • 6.
    Abozidan, Elias
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    On the Second-Generation Migrants’ Hybridity and Otherness in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia. 2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Abramowska, Magdalena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Graphic Arts Technology.
    Ehnlund, Isabell
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Graphic Arts Technology.
    Snowboardens bildspråk 1980-2010: En kartläggning2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Snowboarding is today a major winter sport with its own equipment, its own culture and elite riders. For professional athletes or for those who just snowboard for fun, snowboard becomes an extension of their body while in motion.

    The layout on the boards has changed over the years but despite of this there is a lack of scientific studies in the field. Therefore, this study aimed to identify how the graphics of 240 snowboards have evolved between 1980-2010, and fill some of these holes in the scientific documentation. 

    This survey was based on a visual content analysis, which resulted in interesting observations. The results that emerged were that the result can be generalized and that the development of snowboards graphics has changed over the decades. Snowboards from the various decades have specific characteristics that this study provides.

  • 8. Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Al- Jurjani's Theory of Poetic Imagery1979Book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    al-Sūnaytāt aw al-tawāshīḥ al-kāmilah: bi-al-lughatayn al-ʻArabīyah wa-al-Inklīzīyah2012Book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    الأدب العجائبي والعالم الغرائبي: في كتاب العظمة وفن السرد العربي2007Book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    السذاجة العربيةفي مواجهة الدهاء الأوروبي2011In: الحياةArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12. Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    جماليات التجاور: أو تشابك الفضاءات الإبداعية1998Book (Other academic)
  • 13. Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    عذابات المتنبي: في صحبة كمال أبو ديب والعكس بالعكس 201 هجرية ـ2001 ميلادية1996Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    قليلا من العقل يا سورية2011In: القدس العربيArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    كتاب الحرية2012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    Nabsh, Dalal
    ديوان التدبيج: فتنة الإبداع وذروة الإمتاع2010Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Adolphson, Ulrica
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies.
    Elever i kommunikation med lärare: En samtalsanalytisk studie i klassrummet2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Agerberg, Alexandra
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Jay Gatsby and Myrtle Wilson – Victims of Illusion and Destined to Fail: A Study of False-Consciousness in The Great Gatsby 2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19.
    Ahl, Josefin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    "That Little Box of Light": The Presence of Photography in John Banville’s Ghosts 2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 20.
    Ahlberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Art Education.
    Danielsson, Helena
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Art Education.
    Elevrespons på bloggen2013In: Meningsskapande fritidshem: Studio som arena för multimodalt lärande / [ed] Malin Rohlin, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, 81-113 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De äldre barnen på fritidshemmet är i fokus i detta kapitel, som behandlar barns lärande vid inkludering av visuella uttryck i den pedagogiska verksamheten. Vi lät elever i tolvårsåldern inspireras att samtala om bilder och multimodala texter via en digital utställningsplats. Det övergripande syftet med vår studie var att stärka barnens förmåga att återkoppla och reflektera kring egna och andras arbeten och på så sätt öka deras förståelse både för bildskapande och för de kunskapsområden som varit föremål för deras studier. Olika temaarbeten har följts under en längre tid - projekt som äger rum i skolans sammanhang men i kapitlet diskuteras som idéer för möjligt samarbete mellan lärare på fritidshem och i skolmiljön. Konkreta exempel från barnens arbete och process varvas i kapitlet med teorier och begrepp in området visuell gestaltning och estetiska lärprocesser.

  • 21.
    Ahlborg, Linus
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Sjöbusar: En deskriptiv studie i svensk militärrätt vid Svenska Högsjöflottan under början av 1800-talet.2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här C-uppsatsen syftar till att genom en kvantitativ studie av domböcker från Karlskrona örlogsstation under representiva krigs- och fredsår undersöka ett relativt bortglömt kapitel i svensk militärrättshistoria, nämligen brottslighet och rättspraxis för krigsmakten inom den svenska högsjöflottan mellan åren 1798 och 1812.

    Rymmning det absolut vanligaste registrerade brottsligheten och de värvade volontärerna var rymningsbenägna än de indelta båtsmänen. Straffomvandlingen vid leuteration var återkommande väldigt godtycklig, även med omständigheter borträknat. Volontärerna begick i större utsträckning under rymning flera brott samtidigt och blev också i större utsträckning, efter leuteration av krigsrättens domslut, dömda till spöstraff samt fler antal gatlopp än båtsmän. Vid dubbel legas tagning var volontärer enormt överrepresenterade, speciellt under krigsår, jämfört med båtsmän. Tydligt är att båtsmäns och volontärers skilda positioner som deltids-respektive fulltid gav avtryck i straffregistret. Underofficerarna var klart överrepresenterade när det gällde fylleri i tjänst, angrepp, samt fångförsnillning. Manskapets representation av fylleri i tjänst lyser med sin frånvaro, vilket kan förklaras av extrajudiciell hantering utanför domstol.

  • 22.
    Ahlstrand, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Björkholm, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, CeHum.
    Frohagen, Jenny
    Stockholms universitet.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science. Stockholms universitet, CeHum.
    Learning Study as a way to inquire the meaning of knowing what is to be known: The meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways2013In: WALS - World Association of Lesson Studies, International conference 2013: Lesson and Learning Study as teacher research, 5-9 september: Conference Programme and Abstracts of papers, 2013, 82-82 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Learning Study inquires teaching and learning in relation to a specific object of learning. The meaning of knowing the specific object of learning is specified in the research process – in the planning and analysis of the pre-test as well as in designing and analysis of research lessons. In this symposium the focus will be on different aspects of the knowledge generation in a Learning Study concerning the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known. By inquiring teaching and learning of a specific content our knowledge regarding that content will be differentiated and deepened. The meaning of knowing a specific object of learning is a dynamic knowledge object – depending on the specific group of students in interaction with a specific content. Each new group of students will make it possible to discern new aspects of the learning object. By analyzing student difficulties as well as interactions in the classroom new aspects of the learning object will be discerned. In the symposium four different Learning Studies from different school subjects will be presented. The meaning of knowing will be explored and discussed from different angles – from the perspective of the learners (in the pre-tests) and  the teachers (in the teacher discussions) as well as from how it is constituted in the classroom interaction (documented in the videos from the research lessons).

    Chair: Ingrid Carlgren

    Discussant: Ference Marton

     

    Contributions:

    Pernilla AhlstrandLearning Study as a way to inquire about progress in acting and presence on stage.

    Theatre is a subject in upper secondary school in Sweden as part of the national aesthetic program. The new kind of syllabus is organized in relation to content areas as well as subject specific capabilities for the students to develop. The syllabus also includes criteria for the assessment of students’ capabilities – to be used when giving marks to the students and working with formative assessment or assessment for learning (Black & Wiliam, 1998, Gipps 1995. The criteria are expressed in general, non-subject specific terms. This is for example formulated as the difference between a simple and complex way of being able to express something in the theatre syllabus. In my research I investigate how learning study as a research approach and phenomenography as a method of analyzing pretests can be used as another and deepened way to describe different levels of knowing in relation to the national criteria.

    Theatre knowledge and the way knowledge is transferred is in previous research to a great extent described as tacit (Lagerström 2005, Järleby 2003, Johansson 2012). This gives theatre teachers even further challenges, trying to formulate what is described as tacit knowing (Polanyi 1958/1998 &1967/2009, Johannessen 1988, 1999, 2002, Janik 1995, 1996, Schön 1983).

    The capability of being present was found suitable as an object of learning, as it is something that teachers have experienced difficulties with when teaching and instructing. Presence is a core quality in acting and it is one of the criteria teachers agree on being of great importance when assessing a student but in what way can the knowing of the capability of being present be described?

    It will be discussed whether an outcome space (in relation to filmed material) can be a way to develop teachers and students understanding of the meaning of knowing as a help to work with assessment for learning.

     

    Eva Björkholm - The meaning of knowing how to construct a  linkage mechanism. Discerning aspects of the object of learning by analyzing classroom interactions

    This presentation describes a Learning Study within primary technology education focusing on the capability to construct a specific linkage mechanism. What one has to know in order to be able to construct a linkage mechanism is, however, not self-evident. The study reported here explores the meaning of this specific knowing. The study was conducted in collaboration with two primary school teachers and their two classes (children aged 6-7 years). Throughout the whole study step by step, starting with the analysis of the pre-test, followed by three cycles of planning and evaluation of research lessons, and the analysis of post-test, the meaning of the object of learning was specified (Marton & Pang, 2006; Carlgren, 2012). The presentation will focus on knowledge generated from the video recorded lessons by analyzing the classroom interactions and students’ difficulties that were made visible through these interactions. Teacher-student interactions as well as student-student interactions were analyzed. By analyzing students’ difficulties regarding the specific object of learning, critical aspects of the expected knowing were discerned and in this way the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known was made explicit.

    The results are presented in the form of critical aspects of what it means to know how to construct a linkage mechanism for this group of students. The critical aspects identified in the pre-test were further elaborated in the research lessons and by analyzing the classroom interactions in terms of student difficulties, additional aspects that were critical for students’ learning were identified. By gradually identifying the critical aspects, the collective understanding of the meaning of the object of learning was developed and specified.

     

    Jenny Frohagen – The meaning of knowing how to make expressions in artifacts: generating knowledge through designing lesson tasks   

    The school subject sloyd derives from a practical knowledge tradition which covers knowing in craft and art (Mäkelä, 2011; Hasselskog, 2010; Borg, 2001). However, sloyd teachers express difficulties when trying to explain and deal with aesthetic aspects when teaching sloyd (Fransson, 2010; Borg, 2007). There has been a tendency of trivializing the subject content into a shallow form of craft knowledge understood as ‘merely’ working with traditional craft techniques (Borg, 2008; Skolverket, 2005). There is a need to articulate the aesthetical features of knowing in sloyd. In my contribution I will present results from a Learning Study in sloyd focusing on the knowing of interpreting symbolic expressions in sloyd artefacts.

    In my presentation I will focus on how the iterative process of designing (short) lesson tasks given to the students during the research lessons and also in pre- and post-tests in each cycle, can be a way of understanding the object of learning. Since explicit tests of the students knowing are rarely found in sloyd education, conducting Learning Studies in sloyd can be a meaningful way of developing subject specific tasks. In this Learning Study different designs of tasks has been explored during the process as a way to inquire the knowing of interpreting symbolic expressions in sloyd artefacts. The results from this study show how the articulation of an object of learning in sloyd can be specified and validated throughout the process of designing and carrying out subject specific tests and lesson tasks. Depending on how the object of learning was articulated, the tasks/tests changed focus and the meaning of the knowing differed. By analyzing the students learning outcomes and redesigning the pre- and post-test in a Learning study as well as the given lesson tasks, new aspects of the learning object can be discerned.

     

    Gunn NybergThe meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways: embodied understanding as somatic grasping

    The subject physical education has a tradition of being a ‘practical’ subject. However, practical forms of knowing such as for example bodily awareness and capability to move (e.g. jumping, running or dancing) do not, neither for teachers nor pupils, seem to be a main issue of learning in PE (Tinning, 2010; Redelius et al, 2009,). The knowing involved in moving is not easily articulated and may, according to Polanyi (1954), “often result in explaining away quite genuine practices or experiences” (p. 385). The aim of this study is to explore and articulate the meaning of knowing how to move in a specific way exemplified through a movement called ‘house hop’.

    The study takes as it’s starting point an epistemological perspective on capability to move corresponding with Ryle’s (1949) “knowing how”, not separating mental and physical skills. Accordingly, a phenomenographic analysis of students’ experiencing of the learning object (‘house hop’) have been used.

     

    The paper draws mainly on data from video recordings of the pre-test and transcripts of two video recorded lessons from a Learning Study in upper secondary school. The findings show the meaning of knowing house hop as different ways of knowing the movement as well as several aspects to discern in order to know the movement in a powerful way.

    This presentation will focus on how students’ experiencing of a movement are expressed in their way of moving. Taking this as a starting point when teaching and learning movements can contribute to an approach to capability to move as comprising mental and physical processes as one process. Conceiving the knowing involved in ‘house hopping’ (as well as other ways of moving) this way could also contribute to a discussion concerning subject specific knowledge in PE and particularly it’s ‘practical’ dimension.

     

     

     

  • 23.
    Ahlstrand, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Carlgren, Ingrid
    Stockholms universitet.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science. Stockholms universitet.
    Learning Study as a way to inquire the meaning of knowing what is to be known: The meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Learning Study inquires teaching and learning in relation to a specific object of learning. The meaning of knowing the specific object of learning is specified in the research process – in the planning and analysis of the pre-test as well as in designing and analysis of research lessons. In this symposium the focus will be on different aspects of the knowledge generation in a Learning Study concerning the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known. By inquiring teaching and learning of a specific content our knowledge regarding that content will be differentiated and deepened. The meaning of knowing a specific object of learning is a dynamic knowledge object – depending on the specific group of students in interaction with a specific content. Each new group of students will make it possible to discern new aspects of the learning object. By analyzing student difficulties as well as interactions in the classroom new aspects of the learning object will be discerned. In the symposium four different Learning Studies from different school subjects will be presented. The meaning of knowing will be explored and discussed from different angles – from the perspective of the learners (in the pre-tests) and  the teachers (in the teacher discussions) as well as from how it is constituted in the classroom interaction (documented in the videos from the research lessons).

    Pernilla AhlstrandLearning Study as a way to inquire about progress in acting and presence on stage.

    Theatre is a subject in upper secondary school in Sweden as part of the national aesthetic program. The new kind of syllabus is organized in relation to content areas as well as subject specific capabilities for the students to develop. The syllabus also includes criteria for the assessment of students’ capabilities – to be used when giving marks to the students and working with formative assessment or assessment for learning (Black & Wiliam, 1998, Gipps 1995. The criteria are expressed in general, non-subject specific terms. This is for example formulated as the difference between a simple and complex way of being able to express something in the theatre syllabus. In my research I investigate how learning study as a research approach and phenomenography as a method of analyzing pretests can be used as another and deepened way to describe different levels of knowing in relation to the national criteria.

    Theatre knowledge and the way knowledge is transferred is in previous research to a great extent described as tacit (Lagerström 2005, Järleby 2003, Johansson 2012). This gives theatre teachers even further challenges, trying to formulate what is described as tacit knowing (Polanyi 1958/1998 &1967/2009, Johannessen 1988, 1999, 2002, Janik 1995, 1996, Schön 1983).

    The capability of being present was found suitable as an object of learning, as it is something that teachers have experienced difficulties with when teaching and instructing. Presence is a core quality in acting and it is one of the criteria teachers agree on being of great importance when assessing a student but in what way can the knowing of the capability of being present be described?

    It will be discussed whether an outcome space (in relation to filmed material) can be a way to develop teachers and students understanding of the meaning of knowing as a help to work with assessment for learning.

    Gunn NybergThe meaning of knowing how to move in specific ways: embodied understanding as somatic grasping

    The subject physical education has a tradition of being a ‘practical’ subject. However, practical forms of knowing such as for example bodily awareness and capability to move (e.g. jumping, running or dancing) do not, neither for teachers nor pupils, seem to be a main issue of learning in PE (Tinning, 2010; Redelius et al, 2009,). The knowing involved in moving is not easily articulated and may, according to Polanyi (1954), “often result in explaining away quite genuine practices or experiences” (p. 385). The aim of this study is to explore and articulate the meaning of knowing how to move in a specific way exemplified through a movement called ‘house hop’.

    The study takes as it’s starting point an epistemological perspective on capability to move corresponding with Ryle’s (1949) “knowing how”, not separating mental and physical skills. Accordingly, a phenomenographic analysis of students’ experiencing of the learning object (‘house hop’) have been used.

     

    The paper draws mainly on data from video recordings of the pre-test and transcripts of two video recorded lessons from a Learning Study in upper secondary school. The findings show the meaning of knowing house hop as different ways of knowing the movement as well as several aspects to discern in order to know the movement in a powerful way.

    This presentation will focus on how students’ experiencing of a movement are expressed in their way of moving. Taking this as a starting point when teaching and learning movements can contribute to an approach to capability to move as comprising mental and physical processes as one process. Conceiving the knowing involved in ‘house hopping’ (as well as other ways of moving) this way could also contribute to a discussion concerning subject specific knowledge in PE and particularly it’s ‘practical’ dimension.

     

     

  • 24.
    Ahmadi, Sanaz
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Sorry for Thanking You: Expressions of Gratitude and Apology in Favor Asking Messages of Swedish Advanced Learners of Japanese2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [ja]

    日本語を勉強する外国人の重大な問題の一つは語用論と談話に関連する難しさである。言語習得には文化的な要素が重要であるが、文化の経験がない学習者が基本的な間違いをする人が多人数である。スウェーデン人の日本語学生に支障になる事の中では相手に迷惑や失礼を回避するような方法で要求文を作成する事である。文化的な相違点を参考にし、スウェーデン人の日本語学生に要求の言語行為のDCTを使いインターネット調査を行った。調べるにあたって注目した点は依頼の場合でのポライトネス・ストラテジーという言語行為である。結果的にスウェーデン人の日本語学生の間違いは特の言語行為による事ではなく、国の社会が個人主義か集団主義かという事によるようだ。スウェーデンは日本と比較して個人主義な社会である事で個人を基本とするポライトネス・ストラテジーを用いる事が多い。

  • 25.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Finland and Japan: A peek into shared histories through the tango's migration, transformation, and assimilation2018In: Interaction, Influence and Entanglement: 100 years of Finnish-Japanese Relations and Beyond / [ed] Juha Saunavaara, Seija Jalagin and Kiyoko Uematsu-Ervasti, Undecided , 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    From Buenos Aires to Finland and Japan: The tango's unusual migration2014In: List of Abstracts for Conference Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World, Dalarna University, Sweden, April 2-4, 2014, 2014, 19-20 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Finland, thousands of miles away from Buenos Aires, people crowd the dance floors of restaurants and dance halls nightly to dance to tango music, while the tango has also caught the heart of the people on the other side of the world in Japan. The popularity of the tango in both Finland and Japan, however, is not very well known to the outside world.

    Though some scholars have stated that the tango reflects the personality, mentality and identity of the Finnish and Japanese people, this may only be partially true. Moreover, it is difficult to generalize what the Finnish or Japanese personality is. I argue that the tango's success in these two countries also has significant connections to historical and social factors. As being a dancer myself, I also believe that the 'liminality' (originally a term borrowed from Arnold van Gennep's formulation of rites de passage) of tango dancing plays an important role in these two nations that went through difficult struggles to recover from the damage caused by the war. “The liminal phase is considered sacred, anomalous, abnormal and dangerous, while the  pre- and post-liminal phases are normal and a profane state of being (Selänniemi 1996) and “the regular occurrence of sacred-profane alternations mark important periods of social life or even provide the measure of the passage of time itself”(Leach 1961).

    In this paper, I will discuss motives and paths of how a culture travels, settles and shapes into a new form, using the tango as an example.

  • 27.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Improving Intercultural Competence for the Distance Students in Sweden through Online Joint-Seminars in Japanese with University Students from the United States2014In: Next Generation Learning Conference, March 19–20 2014, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden: Book of abstracts, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been quite a few studies (Helm 2009, Chun 2011, Schenker 2012, Kitade 2012, etc.) regarding the development of intercultural competence through online exchanges. Most of these exchanges, however, are between native speakers and learners of that language. The benefit of such exchanges can be maximized if both parties are learning each other’s language and they both have the opportunity to utilize the languages they are learning during the exchange, but often times, this is not the case.  Byram (1997) suggests that intercultural competence can be assessed using the following components: knowledge, skills, attitudes, and critical awareness.  If ‘intercultural competence’ means not just learning about the target culture, but also about becoming aware of one’s own culture (Liaw 2006), connecting students from different countries who are studying the same target language and culture would be an ideal setting in order for the students to evaluate both their own and target cultures critically. Having learners of a target language from different countries in a virtual classroom also helps create an environment which mimics the language classroom in the target country enabling them to experience studying abroad without leaving their home countries.

    It is often said to be difficult or almost impossible for students in distance courses to develop intercultural competence because of the lack of opportunity to study abroad or the lack of an international atmosphere in the classroom (Tyberg 2009). Thus, the goal of this study is to provide opportunities for all students, regardless of their circumstances, to develop intercultural competence.  In this study, a group of intermediate/advanced level Japanese students from a university in Sweden (all distance students) and a group from a university in the U.S. were brought together in a virtual classroom using an online video conferencing system.  Through their interactions and post-seminar reflections, I examined how students develop intercultural competence.

     

    The results from this study show that through interactions with university students from other countries who study Japanese at the same level, the students can gain not only Japanese skills, but expand their horizons and deepen their understanding of another culture as well as of the topics discussed during the meetings thus satisfying each of the criteria in Byram's model. Not everyone has the opportunity to study abroad, but today's technology allows every student to be a part of the internationalization process, develop his/her cultural-literacy and reflect on his/her identity.

  • 28.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Intercultural communicative competence: the challenges and implications of teaching Japanese politeness strategies to Swedish learners of Japanese2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is extremely important in language instruction. One can avoid embarrassing situations and conflicts caused by misunderstandings if she/he understands the differences in intercultural pragmatics. Politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations. The data I have collected during the past 6 years indicates that Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. As a consequence, Swedish students often fail to utilize appropriate politeness strategies when speaking in Japanese. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural and social norms are not interchangeable and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. Thus Swedish Learners of Japanese should consider politeness discourse as a part of the rules of the language rather than something that can be modified based on one’s opinion.

    The current study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies in Swedish and in Japanese context. While the politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to using verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express their respect more through non-verbal actions or behaviors. Various Japanese and Swedish utterances have also been examined to determine the Discourse Politeness Default suggested by Usami (2006) in order to systematize the politeness strategies in ways similar to grammatical rules.

                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                                          

  • 29.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Issues on cross-cultural pragmatics: Swedish learners' attitudes regarding the learning of Japanese politeness strategies2016In: Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is considered extremely important in today’s language instruction. One can avoid embarrassing situations and conflicts caused by misunderstandings if one understands the differences in intercultural pragmatics. This study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse and how Japanese politeness strategies can be taught effectively to the Swedish learners of Japanese. Politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations. It has been indicated in the course evaluations and comments from the students that Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and they often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. As a consequence, Swedish students often fail to utilize appropriate politeness strategies when speaking in Japanese. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural and social norms are not interchangeable and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. Thus Swedish Learners of Japanese should consider politeness discourse as a part of the rules of the language rather than something that can be modified based on one’s opinion. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors I have complied during the past six years have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies in Swedish and in Japanese context. While politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to use verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express respect more through non-verbal actions or behaviors. This paper suggests ways in which learners of Japanese may overcome these differences.

  • 30.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Language education and identity: Discussing identity in the Sweden-U.S. online joint seminars2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Politeness as a part of intercultural competence2015In: Japanese Language Education in Europe, ISSN 1745-7165, Vol. 20, 395-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching communicative competence is extremely important in language instruction. While politeness discourse varies in complexity according to social distance, relative power between the speakers, and situations, Swedish learners of Japanese often do not see the necessity of learning the polite/honorific discourse and often view these negatively as Swedish society is one of the most egalitarian in the world. However, it is important to point out to foreign language learners that cultural/social norms are not modifiable based on one’s opinion and that one must adapt to the language one is using and the culture one is in. The current study investigates the differences in politeness strategies between Swedish and Japanese discourse. Student surveys and analysis of students’ errors have revealed clear differences in the use of politeness strategies. While politeness, respect, and formality are closely intertwined in Japanese; the Swedes perceive respect and politeness as separate matters. It is also found that while the Japanese are inclined to use verbal politeness strategies, the Swedes express their respect more through non-verbal actions/behaviors. Various Japanese and Swedish utterances have also been examined to determine the DP default (Usami 2006) in order to systematize the politeness strategies in ways similar to grammatical rules.

  • 32.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Review Understanding Intercultural Communication (Second Edition) Stella Ting-Toomey and Leeva C. Chung (2012)2015In: Sociolinguistic Studies, ISSN 1750-8649, E-ISSN 1750-8657, Vol. 9, no 4, 507-513 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Investigating the use of the verbs ”naru” in Japanese and ”bli” in Swedish through translation2013In: Nordic Association of Japanese and Korean Studies (NAJAKS): Abstracts for 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how use of the Swedish verb “bli” corresponds to the Japanese verb “naru” using translated materials as a corpus.  

     

    Japanese is said to be a situation-oriented language, while English is person-oriented.

              e.g., Mariko wa kekkon surukotoni NARImashita.

                       (It became so that Mariko will be married.)

                       ‘Mariko will get married’ in English.

     

    The Swedish verb ”bli” usually means ’to become’ or ’to be (as an auxiliary verb),’ yet is used more widely than these English meanings.

              e.g., Det blir 100 kronor, tack.

                       (100 kr ni NARI-masu.)

                       ’It makes/will be 100kr.’

     

    Examples like this lead to the observation that ”bli” is used in a context more similar to the Japanese verb ”naru.” than English verb “become.” Comparison of some translated materials also shows that “bli” is often translated into Japanese as “naru” while it is more likely to be replaced by a transitive or intransitive verb in English.

     

    However, erros such as

               *okoru ni NARU (verb ‘to be upset’+naru)

                  [okoru: a verb]

               *annshin ni NARU (noun ‘feeling at ease’ +naru)   

                  [annshin suru: a verb derived from a noun]

    which are made by Swedish learners of Japanese indicate that the translation of “bli” into Japanese is not so straight forward.

     

    In this study, we examined the following questions:

    1. How is ”bli” translated into Japanese/English?
    2. If ”bli” is translated into ”naru” in Japanese, in what grammatical context(s) does it occur?
    3. How are these variations related to the errors students make in translating ”bli” into  Japanese?

     

    In order to examine the above research questions, we conducted two separate studies:

     

    Study I: Examining how Swedish bli is translated into Japanese in literature translation

     

    Using children´s novels “Sommerboken” by Tove Jansson and “Pippi Långstrump” by Astrid Lindgren as the data source, all the sentences that contain bli were extracted along with their translations into English and Japanese. The extracted sentences were, then, categorized according to the various types of usage of the verb bli, and the translation into Japanese for each of those categories was analyzed.

     

    Study II: The translation of various uses of bli into Japanese by Swedish students

     

    Study I above showed usages of the verb bli in various context. In Study II, we tried to see if some of these usages cause more problems than the others for the Swedish students. The students in the Japanese-English translation course at Högskolan Dalarna (Sweden) were given 7 Swedish sentences containing various usages of bli, and were asked to translate them into Japanese. Then the accuracy of the translation and the translation techniques used were analyzed.

     

    The results from Study I showed that there were numerous usages of the verb bli, such as describing conditions, describing the changes of conditions, indicating certain emotional status, and so on, which naturally led to the variety in Japanese translation. Furthermore,  apart from the most literal translation, which is to use the verb naru, various types of compound verbs (main verb – help verb combinations) were used in order to express different nuances.

     

    In some of the usages identified above, translation shifts were obligatory when translated into Japanese; i.e. the literal translation was impossible, and the translator has to make minor changes from the ST (source text) to the TT (target text), such as changes of grammatical categories or of voice (e.g. passive to active).

     

    The results from the Study II show that the sentences which require more complicated translation shifts tend to cause more errors when students translate them into Japanese.

     

    Clarifying how the use of “bli” correlates with the use of “naru” will not only help Swedish students understand the use of the somewhat difficult concept of “naru,” but also help translators deal with this issue. Finding a more systematic way to translate “bli” into Japanese using more tokens from various genres would be necessary in order to achieve this.

     

  • 34.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Takamiya, Yumi
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.
    Beikoku to sueeden no nihongo gakushusha wo tsunaida jissen: aidentiti wo teemanishita torikumi2016In: : , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [ja]

    言語教育におけるソーシャルネットワーキングアプローチ(以下 SNA)では、「他者の発見、自己の発見、つながりの実現」を理念に、従来の「わかる」「できる」能力に加え、新たに「つながる」能力を 重要視する(當作 2013)。SNAに基づいてことばと文化を学ぶことで、学習者の人間的成長が促され、社会力も獲得される。  本発表では、上記の教育理念を念頭に、異なる文化圏で学ぶ日本語学習者をオンラインでつないだ取り組みについて紹介する。実践には米国とスウェーデンの大学で中上級レベルの日本語を学ぶ学習者10名が参加した。1学期間、アイデンティティをテーマに授業を行い、非同期型ツールであるブログ、同期型ツールであるビデオ会議システムを利用して双方を継続的につないだ。  アンケート、インタビュー、観察データを分析した結果、学習者はこのようなオンラインでの交流により、言語面だけでなく、自己・他者のアイデンティティや文化について肯定的な視点を持つようになるという変化が見られた。これは自己・他者の新たな発見といえる。また、参加者は、日本に興味があるという共通点があるため、様々なトピックについて積極的に探求し、互いに教え学びあう関係を築くことが容易にできた。さらに「つながり」が形成されていくに従い、日本だけでなく米国やスウェーデンについてもより知りたいと考えるようになり、好奇心の幅が広がった。これはつながりの理想的な実現であるといえよう。  通常、海外の日本語学習者は、日本の英語学習者と交流するケースが多いが、この場合、母語話者に教えてもらうという一方向的な形のコミュニケーションをとりやすい。一方、異なる場所で学ぶ日本語学習者同士の交流の場合、対等な形でのコミュニケーションがとれ、場所によって日本の捉え方も違うことに気づくことで、多元的な視点で日本を捉え直すきっかけにもなる。これは学習者の言語・文化面、精神面での成長にとって大きな意義がある。発表では、学習者、教師だけでなく、教室内外の多くの人たちをつなぐことを可能にするオンラインツールについて紹介し、その効果的な使い方や交流を成功させるための具体的な提案も行う。

  • 35.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Takamiya, Yumi
    University of Alabama at Birmingham.
    Identity (re)construction and improvement in intercultural competence through synchronous and asynchronous telecollaboration: Connecting Japanese language learners in the United States and Sweden2018In: Technology-supported learning in and out of the Japanese language classroom: Theoretical, empirical, and pedagogical developments / [ed] E. Zimmerman & A. McMeekin, Multilingual Matters, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Takamiya, Yumi
    The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
    Improving intercultural competence through online joint-seminars with university students from the U.S. and Sweden2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been quite a few studies regarding the development of intercultural competence through online exchanges (Helm 2009, Chun 2011, Schenker 2012, Kitade 2012, etc.). Most of these exchanges, however, are between native speakers and learners of that language. The benefit of such exchanges may be maximized if both parties are learning the same foreign language and have the opportunity to utilize the language they are learning during the interaction. As defined by Byram (1997) and Liaw (2006), 'intercultural competence' is not just learning about the target culture, but also about becoming aware of one's own culture, and connecting students from different countries who are studying the same target language and culture would be an ideal setting in order for the students to evaluate both their own and target cultures critically.

    It is often said to be difficult or almost impossible for students in distance courses to develop intercultural competence because of the lack of opportunity to study abroad or the lack of an international atmosphere in the classroom (Tyberg 2009). Thus another goal of this study is to investigate the possibility of providing opportunities for all students, regardless of their circumstances, to develop intercultural competence.

    During the spring semester 2012, a group of fourth level (intermediate to advanced level) Japanese students from Gettysburg College in the United States and from Högskolan Dalarna (Dalarna University) in Sweden took part in a study of how Japanese learners from different countries benefit from communicating with each other in Japanese. Throughout the term, the students exchanged ideas and views regarding the topics surrounding the issues of “identity” via blogs and joint-seminars using an online video conferencing system. The topic “identity” was selected since both parties can discuss the issue from different perspectives such as 'foreigners in Japan', 'foreigners in the U.S./Sweden', 'Japanese people living in the U.S./Sweden', as well as from the students' 'own identities.'

    The student survey showed that the students from both Sweden and the United States found the project to be fun, interesting and a new and positive experience. One student epitomized the comments from the majority of the participants. – “We were actively discussing identity with students raised in another culture in a class setting, which lends an air of understanding and interest to the discussion.”

    The results from this study suggest that through interactions with university students from other countries who study Japanese at the same level, the students can gain not only Japanese skills, but expand their horizons and deepen their understanding of another culture as well as the topics discussed during the meetings. Not everyone has an opportunity to study abroad, but today's technology allows every student to be a part of the internationalization process, develop his/her cultural-literacy and reflect on his/her identity.

    In this session, the process, benefits, and limitations of our online exchanges will be discussed and some suggestions on how one should conduct and what are required for in ordered to have a successful international online exchanges will also be presented based on our experiences.

    The target audience of this session are teachers and educators as well as administrators who recognize the importance of acquisition of intercultural competence, not limited to but especially, in language education, and those who are considering the possibilities of allowing students to participate in the internationalization process without traveling abroad.

    References:

    Byram, M. (1997). Teaching and assessing intercultural communicative competence. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

    Byram, M., Gribkova, B., & Starkey, H. (2002). Developing the intercultural dimension in language teaching: A practical introduction for teachers. Strasbourg, France: Council of Europ.

    Chun, D. M. (2011). Developing Intercultural communicative competence through online exchanges. CALICO Journal, 28 (2), 392-419.

    Helm, F. (2009). Language and culture in an online context: what can learner diaries tell us about intercultural competence. Language and Intercultural Communication, 9 (2), 91-104.

    Högskoleverket. (2008). En högskola i världen: internationalisering för kvalitet. Högskoleverkets rapportserie 2008:15R.

    Kitade, K. (2012). An exchange structure analysis of the development of online intercultural activity. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 25 (1), 65-86.

    Liaw, M-L. (2006). E-learning and the development of intercultural competence. Language Learning &Technology, 10(3), 49-64.

    Schenker, T. (2012). Intercultural competence and cultural learning through telecollaboration. CALICO Journal, 29(3), 449-470.

    Tyberg, E. (2009). Internationalisering: perspektivbyte, förhållningssätt och fredsprojekt. In Martin Stigmar, (Ed.). Högskolepedagogik: att vara professionell som lärare i högskolan, Chapter 12. Stockholm: Liber.

  • 37.
    Airaksinen Ahlsén, Joel
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Öppna test jämfört med blindtest: Hur påverkas lyssnarens bedömning?2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna undersökning söker ett svar på hur den relativt vana lyssnarens bedömning av ljudkvalitet påverkas av ett så kallat öppet test, där det som bedöms är känd för lyssnaren, jämfört med ett blindtest, där detta objekt är okänt. Frågan appliceras på kvalitetsbedömningen av digitala kodningstekniker, d.v.s. hur lyssnaren påverkas av att valet av kodningsteknik som avlyssnas är känd eller inte. För att ta reda på detta genomfördes ett lyssningstest med nio deltagare. Deltagarna fick betygssätta perceptuellt kodade ljudfiler mot en känd referens, både som ett blindtest samt i ett öppet test. Resultatet är mångtydigt och inga generella slutsatser för hur lyssnaren påverkas av ett öppet test jämfört med ett blindtest går att uppfatta. Resultatet visar dock att påverkan ett öppet test har på lyssnarens bedömning är högst individuell. Lyssningstest i form av blindtest bör därför användas för att uppnå pålitligast resultat. 

  • 38.
    Alagic, Aida
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Swedish as Second Language.
    Lärarstudenters syn på svenska som andraspråk2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här uppsatsen var att ta reda på lärarstudenters syn på ämnet svenska som andraspråk eller närmare vilka faktorer som påverkade beslutet i val av ämne samt vilka orsaker var de främsta att lärarstudenter valde/inte valde att utbilda sig i svenska som andraspråk.För att få svar på mina frågeställningar har en kvalitativ enkätsundersökning använts där öppna frågor ställdes till lärarstudenter.Undersökningsresultat visar att faktorer som påverkade lärarstudenters val av ämne var intresset för ämnet, barnens ålder, flexibelt jobb, eget modersmål och intagningskravet var de mest nämnda. Resultatet visar vidare att intresset för att bli lärare i svenska som andraspråk var stort dock var lärarstudenter bara beredda på att läsa högst en termin för att bli detta. Lärarstudenter tyckte även att ämnet är viktigt och nödvändigt men att det fortfarande har låg status. Själva lärarstudenterna hade ingen eller lite kompetens i ämnet.Slutsatserna som dras är att ämnet fortfarande används som ett resursämne och därför har låg status vilket i sin tur leder till att få lärarstudenter utbildar sig i detta viktiga ämne.

  • 39.
    Alatalo, Tarja
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Educational Work.
    Har lärare i åk 1-3 möjligheter att genomföra skicklig läs- och skrivundervisning?2012In: Dyslexi, ISSN 1401-2480, Vol. 1, no 1, 11-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Aldea, Silvia
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    A comparative study of approaches to audiovisual translation2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For those who are not new to the world of Japanese animation, known mainly as anime, the debate of "dub vs. sub" is by no means anything out of the ordinary, but rather a very heated argument amongst fans. The study will focus on the differences in the US English version between the two approaches of translating audio-visual media, namely subtitling (official subtitles and fanmade subtitles) and dubbing, in a qualitative context. More precisely, which of the two approaches can store the most information from the same audiovisual segment, in order to satisfy the needs of the anime audience. In order to draw substantial conclusions, the analysis will be conducted on a corpus of 1 episode from the first season of the popular mid-nineties TV animated series, Sailor Moon. The main objective of this research is to analyze the three versions and compare the findings to what anime fans expect each of them to provide, in terms of how culture specific terms are handled, how accurate the translation is, localization, censorship, and omission. As for the fans’ opinions, the study will include a survey regarding the personal preference of fans when it comes to choosing between the official subtitled version, the fanmade subtitles and the dubbed version.

  • 41.
    Alejandro, Sanchez
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Spanish.
    El subjuntivo en los discursos políticos (1930 -2011): Análisis comparativo de uso y frecuencia2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 42.
    Alenryd, Helena
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Art Education.
    Bildundervisning i bildkommunikation och bildmedier: En litteraturstudie av didaktisk forskning kring bildämnets läroplansfokus2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete är en systematisk litteraturstudie på kvalitativ grund.

    Resultatet bygger på forskning kring problemformuleringen som analyserats och sedan

    tolkats. Analysmetoden som valts till studien är en innehållsanalys som avser jämföra den

    utvalda forskningen för att bl.a. finna likheter och skillnader. Den pedagogiska debatten kring

    bildämnet indikerar att undervisningen inte ligger i linje med ämnesplanen. Detta blir

    problematiskt för bildämnets utveckling och innebär att undervisningen får didaktiska

    konsekvenser. Litteraturstudien har därför haft i avseende att undersöka den bilddidaktiska

    forskningens syn på den bildkommunikativa inriktningen som varit aktuell i ämnesplaner för

    bild sedan år 1980. Syftet har varit att synliggöra bildundervisningens utveckling i förhållande

    till den bildkommunikativa inriktningen samt dess didaktiska betydelse i relation till

    bildundervisningen. Genom att undersöka hur forskningen ser på bildundervisningens

    utveckling i förhållande till den bildkommunikativa inriktningen kan problematiken kring

    utvecklingen synliggöras. Genom att undersöka den bildkommunikativa inriktningens

    didaktiska betydelse för undervisningen synliggörs också vilka didaktiska konsekvenser ett

    avvikande från ämnesinriktningen kan få för samtidens bildundervisning. Utefter syftet har

    frågeställningar formulerats. Svaren på frågeställningarna ges sedan i resultatet, tolkning av

    resultatet samt de slutsatser som dras. Studien visar att det blir av stor didaktisk betydelse att

    bildundervisningen ligger i linje med den bildkommunikativa ämnesinriktningen, med hänsyn

    till elevers och samhällets samtida och framtida behov och yrkesliv, men även för lärarens

    professionalism samt bildämnets status i skolan. Studien visar också att bildundervisningen

    avviker från den bildkommunikativa ämnesinriktningen. Studien visar att denna avvikning

    sker bl. a mot bakgrund av att äldre ämneskonceptioner lever kvar bland verksamma

    bildlärare, att bildlärare saknar kunskaper som behövs för att jobba i linje med inriktningen

    samt att bildämnet har en marginaliserad roll i skolan med bristande resurser.

  • 43.
    Alfredsson, Anton
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Filmen, musiken och rollfiguren: En studie om hur musik påverkar uppfattningen av rollfigurer.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en uppsats som grundar sig på en kvantitativ och kvalitativ undersökning om hur musik kan påverka uppfattningen om en rollfigurs sinnesstämning och karaktärsdrag i film. Syftet med uppsatsen är att försöka bidra med en ökad förståelse för vilken kraft musiken har i berättande sammanhang. En djupdykning i hur vi kan påverkas och tolka en berättelse olika beroende på vilket emotionellt uttryck som musiken förmedlar. Testdeltagare har fått se tre versioner av ett och samma filmklipp. En version utan musik och de andra två med två olika musikstycken. Det visade sig att man påverkades olika beroende på vilken musikversion som spelades. Resultaten gav tydliga tendenser att peka åt olika håll i de adjektivskalor som deltagarna fått svara på i enkäten. Det var tydligt att musiken i hög grad påverkade bedömningarna av rollfigurens sinnesstämning och karaktärsdrag.  

  • 44.
    Alfvén, Valérie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Engel, HuguesStockholms universitet.Lindgren, CharlotteDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Översättning för en ny generation: Nordisk barn- och ungdomslitteratur på export2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Alkvist, Lars-Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    Heidegren, C-G Hegels fenomenologi1996In: Tidskriften Folkhögskolan, no 7, 24-25 p.Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Alm-Arvius, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Figurative and Non-figurative Aspects of Polysemy in the Word Language2012In: The Stockholm 2012 Metaphor Festival : Table of Contents : Abstracts, 2012, 6-7 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Almgren, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Motivation in English language acquisition: English as a foreign language in upper secondary school2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about students’ motivation to learn English and the aim is to find out if their scores on the national test can be correlated with their reported level of motivation. As English has become a global language, it is taught in Swedish school as an obligatory subject. When speaking about learning English, it is common to approach the subject of what motivates students to learn. Theories developed on the subject suggest that there are different kinds of motivation and this thesis focuses on integrative and instrumental motivation and the L2 motivational system, which have been said to be important aspects of motivation. The study was done by handing out a questionnaire to 45 students in an upper secondary school, containing statements and questions about their motivation to learn English, and then comparing their answers with their grades. When analyzing the results, it was found that there is a correlation between the answers to the statements and the students’ scores on the national test. The lower scoring students showed more tendencies to disagree with the statements while the higher scoring students more often agreed. These findings suggest that motivation can have a visible effect on students’ performance in English.

  • 48.
    Almgren, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Varför grammatik?: Svensklärares attityder till grammatikundervisning Författare: Malin2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här är en studie om svensklärares attityd till grammatikundervisning. Jag har undersökt vad några svensklärare på gymnasieskolor i Mellansverige har för uppfattning om grammatik, deras egen grammatikundervisning, och grammatik i styrdokumenten. För att försöka svara på frågeställningarna har sex stycken semistrukturerade intervjuer genomförts med svensklärare på några olika skolor i området. Intervjuerna har visat att det finns skilda åsikter bland de medverkande lärarna kring frågor om deras egen erfarenhet av grammatik, deras undervisning, grammatikens roll i svenskämnet och styrdokumentens behandling av grammatiken. Det upptäcktes även likheter i, till exempel, deras uppfattningar om grammatikens nytta och det faktum att de flesta var missnöjda med styrdokumenten samt att elevernas förkunskaper när de börjar på gymnasiet inte alltid är tillräckliga. Studiens resultat ger en inblick i några svensklärares attityder till grammatikundervisning, men är inte generaliserbar och speglar inte hur alla svensklärares åsikter ser ut.

  • 49.
    Almgren, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Älskade och hatade grammatik: En systematisk litteraturstudie kring attityder till grammatikundervisning2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study’s aim is to investigate what research in the field of grammar shows about attitudes toward grammar teaching, and if the grammar teaching in the present time is satisfactory. This study is a systematic literature study and contains database searching to find scientific studies and theses. The result found in this study shows that research in the field is very thin and not updated in the most recent years. The first research question is about attitudes towards grammar teaching, and several of the results show that grammar has a bad reputation and is often perceived as boring and difficult, and that this view of grammar often can correlate to classrooms where traditional grammar teaching is used. Amongst teachers, many of them find grammar hard to justify to their students. The second research question is about how well grammar teaching works in our time. This is difficult to find an answer to since the research is not very extensive in the field, but judging by the negative attitudes towards the subject, there seem to be room for improvement

  • 50.
    Altéus-Stenqvist, Charlotte
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    The difference in usage of first-person pronouns Between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been looking for any differences in the use of first-person

    pronouns between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, and it has also tried to

    clarify whether Hillary Clinton uses I-words more frequently than we-words.

    The data has been gathered from pre-election speeches, and frequencies,

    rankings and referent categories have been analyzed. The study has found that

    there are some differences in the use of first-person pronouns between Hillary

    Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The singular pronouns show us how they choose to

    present themselves to the voter. The plural pronouns show us which referent

    categories, or ingroups, the candidates identify themselves with, and if there are

    any signs of what Billig calls Banal Nationalism (1995) in their speeches.

    Overall, the results show that Hillary Clinton uses I-words and we-words more

    frequently than Bernie Sanders does, but opposite to what some online news

    sites have suggested, this study show that her frequencies of we-words are

    higher than her frequencies of I-words.

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