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  • 1. Abrahamsson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Stenman, Jane
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Attitudes to dental hygienists: Evaluation of The Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey in a Swedish population of patients and students2007In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 5, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Dahl, KE
    et al.
    Wang, N
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Does oral health matter in people’s daily life?: Oral health-related quality of life in adults 35–47 years of age in Norway2012In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of oral health on aspects of daily life measured by the Dental Impact Profile (DIP) in 35- to 47-year-old individuals in Norway, and to study associations between reported effects and demographic variables, subjectively assessed oral health, general health, oral health behaviour and clinical oral health.

    Material and methods: A stratified randomized sample of 249 individuals received a questionnaire regarding demographic questions, dental visits, oral hygiene behaviour, self-rated oral health and general health and satisfaction with oral health. The DIP measured the effects of oral health on daily life. Teeth present and caries experience were registered by clinical examination. Bi- and multivariate analyses and factor analysis were used.

    Results: Items most frequently reported to be positively or negatively influenced by oral health were chewing and biting, eating, smiling and laughing, feeling comfortable and appearance. Only 1% reported no effects of oral health. Individuals with fewer than two decayed teeth, individuals who rated their oral health as good or practised good oral health habits reported more positive effects than others on oral quality of life (P = 0.05). When the variables were included in multivariate analysis, none was statistically significant. The subscales of the DIP were somewhat different from the originally suggested subscales.

    Conclusions: This study showed that most adults reported oral health to be important for masticatory functions and confirmed that oral health also had impacts on other aspects of life.

  • 3. Dahl, KE
    et al.
    Wang, NJ
    Holst, D
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Oral health-related quality of life among adults 68-77 years old in Nord-Tröndelag, Norway2011In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental health has mostly been measured by dental staff disregarding patient’s experiences. However, clinical conditions alone do not fully indicate how people feel affected by their oral status. The aim of this study was to investigate how clinical recorded dental health, self-rated dental health, satisfaction with dental health were related to oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) assessed by Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) in 68–77 years old. A total of 151 individuals completed a questionnaire on self-rated dental health, satisfaction with dental health and the short form of OHIP-14. Clinical examination was performed registering number of teeth and dental caries. In total 63% of the individuals rated their dental health as good, and 59% were satisfied with their dental health. Using the OHIP-14 42% reported no problems or oral discomfort at all. The proportion of individuals reporting problems or discomfort varied between 13% and 43% according to the dimensions of OHIP-14. The most frequently reported problems were physical pain (43%), psychological discomfort (28%) and psychological disability (28%). Individuals who rated their dental health as poor and those who were dissatisfied with their dental health had significantly lower OHRQoL than other individuals. The study showed relationship between self-evaluations of dental health and OHRQoL in 68–77 years old. Individuals with few teeth reported lower OHRQoL than others, but no association between clinical caries status and OHRQoL could be found.

  • 4. Edman, K
    et al.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Nordström, B
    Holmlund, A
    Hellberg, D
    Trends over 30 years in the prevalence and severity of alveolar bone loss and the influence of smoking and socio-economic factors: based on epidemiological surveys in Sweden 1983-20132015In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 283-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological studies of the prevalence of periodontitis over an extended time using the same methodology to investigate and classify periodontitis are sparse in the literature. Smoking and socio-economic factors have been proven to increase the risk for periodontal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate 30-year time trends, using the same methodology to classify the prevalence and severity in alveolar bone loss (ABL) and to investigate the influence of tobacco and socio-economic factors.

    METHODS: Four cross-sectional epidemiological studies in an adult population were performed in the county of Dalarna, Sweden, in 1983, 2003, 2008 and 2013. Random samples of 787-1133 individuals aged 35-85 who answered a questionnaire about tobacco use and socio-economic factors were radiographically and clinically examined. A number of teeth, ABL and calculus visible on radiographs were registered. The severity of ABL as detected on radiographs was classified into no bone loss, moderate or severe.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of moderate ABL decreased from 45% in 1983 to 16% in 2008, but increased to 33% in 2013 (P < 0.05). The prevalence of severe ABL remained the same from 1983 (7%) to 2013 (6%). Calculus visible on radiographs increased from 22% in 2008 to 32% in 2013 (P < 0.05). Socio-economic factors had limited impact on the severity of ABL.

    CONCLUSION: Moderate ABL and calculus visible on radiographs significantly increased between 2008 and 2013. Smoking was the strongest factor associated with ABL overall.

  • 5.
    Jönsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Services, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Per
    Department of Public Health and Caring Services, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Nils
    Department of Periodontology, Public Dental Health Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Improved compliance and self-care in patients with periodontitis: a randomized control trial2006In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Jönsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden and Dental health care administration in Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Oscarson, Nils
    National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Per
    Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden and Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    An individually tailored treatment programme for improved oral hygiene: introduction of a new course of action in health education for patients with periodontitis2009In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 166-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe and evaluate an individually tailored treatment programme based on a behavioural medicine approach to oral hygiene self-care for patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Methods: Two experimental single-case studies with multiple-baseline design across different self-administered oral hygiene behaviours were conducted. Cognitive Behavioural techniques were used to organize the strategies for the intervention and the approach to counselling was inspired by and structured in accordance with Motivational Interviewing. The central features in the programme were the individual analysis of knowledge and oral hygiene habits, individually set goals for oral hygiene behaviour, practice of manual dexterity for oral hygiene aids, continuous self-monitoring of the behaviour and prevention of relapse.

    Results: Both participants reached the predecided criteria for clinical significance in reducing plaque and bleeding on probing. Reductions of periodontal probing depth were achieved as well. The positive results remained stable throughout the 2-year study period.

    Conclusion: The successful application of this educational model suggests that it could be used as a method for tailoring interventions targeted to oral hygiene for patients with periodontal conditions. The programme will now be tested in a larger randomized controlled trial.

  • 7. Lundgren, A-M
    et al.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Jönsson, Birgitta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. The Public Dental Health Service Competence Centre of Northern Norway (TkNN), Tromsø, Norway.
    Do adolescents who are night owls have a higher risk of dental caries?: A case-control study2016In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 220-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the association between circadian rhythm and the risk of caries in adolescents, as well as their dietary and toothbrushing habits.

    METHODS: A group of 196 adolescents (15 and 16 years old) were divided into two equal groups based on caries risk (case = high risk; and control = low risk). Before their dental examinations, they were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire included questions on circadian rhythm, dietary and oral self-care habits, and demographic variables. The participants were divided into three circadian types: evening types who are alert in the evening and tired in the morning; morning types who are the opposite; and neutral types who are neither particularly alert in the evening nor extremely tired in the morning.

    RESULTS: The most common sleep-cycle group type was neutral (50%). After this came evening types (37%) and finally morning types (13%). Morning and neutral types reported more frequently than evening types that they had breakfast every morning and brushed their teeth twice a day. More evening types were categorized as at high risk of caries. Circadian rhythm, breakfast habits and toothbrushing frequency were associated with a high risk of caries. The predicted probability of being at high risk of caries was almost four times higher for evening types than for morning types (OR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-10.9).

    CONCLUSION: Adolescents who belonged to the evening circadian rhythm group brushed their teeth more seldom, ate breakfast less regularly and had a higher risk of caries than morning types. A patient's circadian rhythm should be considered when planning oral health education for adolescents with a high risk of caries.

  • 8.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Oral care among patients with cancer2003In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Abrahamsson, Kajsa Henning
    Dental beliefs, patients´specific attitudes towards dentists and dental hygienists: a comparative study2008In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 6, p. 205-213Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Jönsson, Birgitta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    A comparison of two questionnaires measuring oral health-related quality of life before and after dental hygiene treatment in patients with periodontal disease2012In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the usefulness of two different questionnaires assessing oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) at the basic examination and after initial dental hygiene treatment (DHtx).

    Methods: A total of 42 patients referred for periodontal treatment completed the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) at the basic periodontal examination. They underwent DHtx and completed the questionnaires once again after the treatment.

    Results: No statistically significant differences could be found between the two assessments, neither for the total scores nor for any of the separate items of the OHIP-14 or the GOHAI. However, the GOHAI questionnaire seems to result in a greater variety in the responses indicating that the floor effect is not as pronounced as for the OHIP-14. Those who had rated their oral health as good reported significantly better OHRQoL on both questionnaires. The same pattern was found for patients who reported that they were satisfied with their teeth. After DHtx and necessary extractions, there was a statistically significant correlation between the number of teeth and the total scores on both questionnaires. No other statistically significant correlations with periodontal variables could be found.

    Conclusion: No statistically significant difference could be found after DHtx compared to before in regard to OHRQoL assessed with OHIP-14 and GOHAI. However, there was a greater variety in the responses with the GOHAI questionnaire; it may hereby be more useful for patients with periodontal disease.

  • 11.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Olsson, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Research utilisation among Swedish dental hygienists2004In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, no 2, p. 46-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Olsson, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Research utilization among dental hygienists in Sweden - a national survey2005In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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